Is this a Chauncey Jerome Movement

tliette

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I'm looking at a Chauncey Jerome Ogee clock that the label says was built in Bristol, Connecticut. My question is the only markings on the movement, that I can find, is 7686 at the shaft for the hands. I thought Jerome put his name or initials on his movements. Can someone assist me, if it's not a Jerome movement, I'll pass on it

Thanks,
Ted

CJ Movement.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

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tliette

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Steven,
I don't know where to start to say thank you. This is my 1st Chauncey Jerome clock and I'm been leery of buying it because of how the movement was signed but if I was going to make this investment I didn't want to get a bogus movement. The web site gave me a ton of information, not only on the movement I'm questioning but a great resource for any future Jerome clocks I may purchase. Thanks for the enormous assistance you've given me today.

Again thanks,
Ted
 

Jerome collector

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I'll add my two cents to Steven's reply. It is indeed a type 1.211 movement made by Chauncey Jerome, dating to the early 1840s.
Mike
 

Steven Thornberry

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I'll add my two cents to Steven's reply. It is indeed a type 1.211 movement made by Chauncey Jerome, dating to the early 1840s.
Mike
Hi, Mike Nice to see/read you. What I haven't found, no doubt due to my iggerance, is the reason for the movement number. Do you happen to know?
 

Jerome collector

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Steven,

It's not known why Jerome chose to use serial numbers for a short period. Years ago, I asked Snowden Taylor if he knew why the serial numbers were used, and he had no idea. As best I can tell, serial-numbered movements date to around 1840-1841. As I indicate on my website, 30-hr movements have numbers ranging from the low 3000s to over 10,000 (10,725 is the highest I've seen). 8-day movements show up with serial numbers lower than 1000.

Mike
 

Steven Thornberry

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Steven,

It's not known why Jerome chose to use serial numbers for a short period. Years ago, I asked Snowden Taylor if he knew why the serial numbers were used, and he had no idea. As best I can tell, serial-numbered movements date to around 1840-1841. As I indicate on my website, 30-hr movements have numbers ranging from the low 3000s to over 10,000 (10,725 is the highest I've seen). 8-day movements show up with serial numbers lower than 1000.

Mike
Thanks, Mike. Serial numbers on American movements, though not otherwise unknown, are the rare exception. We need to find that piece of paper, a memo from Chauncey to Noble, saying "Hey, let's put serial numbers on these particular movements for a couple of years and confuse the hell out of folks 175 years down the road!"
 

tliette

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Everyone that gave their opinions and shared their information I want to say thank you. I've learned and discovered a lot these past few days, but the seller of the Chauncey Jerome Ogee clock changed his mind after I worked to discover if the movement was a Jerome. So I still don't have my first Jerome Ogee but I now invaluable info I can use later.

Again thanks,
Ted
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff