Is there a safe or best way to apply Phoenix Transfers?

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by Rockin Ronnie, Feb 21, 2019.

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  1. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    "Phoenix Transfers" come in a number of sizes in both Roman and Arabic numerals.

    These are very thin transfers that are no thicker than a painted numeral. They are transferred from a backing sheet using pressure.

    Is their a correct or safe way to do this?

    Ron
     
  2. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    #2 Joseph Bautsch, Feb 23, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2019
    Ron, the biggest problem I have had with the pressure transfers is their age. With age the transfers deteriorate and then they don't stick, crack and even fall off after rubbing them on. So I've learned to make a test application from the sheet before trying to put them on a project. I've never had much luck trying to apply them freehand. I have resorted to cutting the number, letter or object out of the sheet, putting a piece of scotch tape over it, and sticking it where I want it before rubbing it down. That way if you don't like its location you can peal it up and move it. If you are applying it to paper you should use a flat clear archival spray on the paper to seal it up. This will prevent damage from dirt, finger prints, and from pealing up the scotch tape. These rub on transfers require some skill that comes with practice. If you don't do this very often you might want to sacrifice some of the items on the sheet on another sheet to practice placement and how they will rub down.

    P.S., I you are applying the rub on to a painted surface, especially if its an old one, you might want to use the archival spray on that surface as well. A rub on does not stick well on rough surfaces.
     
  3. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Thanks, very helpful. It will be applied to clear glass, the access door on a wall clock which has never had one.What tool or implement is used to transfer?

    Ron
     
  4. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Buy a rub-on styles or make one. Any piece of wood about 1/4" to 3/16" square or round. Round off the end and then polish it to a bright finish. I usually use the end of an artist's paint brush. If you are putting a rub-on on glass, the inside of a clock door glass, then when viewing it from the other side any lettering or numbers will be reversed. If you are applying decoration of some type then viewing it from either side should be fine. Most transfers on clock door glass are decals and are designed to be applied to the inside of the door glass so they can be viewed from the outside.
     
  5. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Excellent. You have been a great help.

    Ron
     
  6. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    I find that pressure needed can be anything from "moderate" to "OMG I"M GONNA BREAK THE GLASS IF I PRESS ANY HARDER!" I also tend to stick them in place with a tape (you can cut little windows for tape in the centre if needed).
     
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