Is it clean ?

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Dec 18, 2020
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Sorry to answer a question with a question but it really depends what you mean by clean? Might be an idea to begin by asking what you want to do with the clock? Do you want to run it or is it effectively a static object? if you want to run hot all the time or even occasionally, it might be useful to mentally split the clock into working and non working surfaces. A bit like a car there are bearing surfaces and working surfaces and if you like the chassis. The chassis of your clock is the clock frame (plates and pillars) and all the other non-working surfaces. sounds a bit extreme but all these working surfaces in place. If a clock is to work 'safely', it is the bearings that need to be 'clean'. This can only be achieved by disassembly and washing out those bearings. Once the clock is re-assembled with new lubrication, the oil slowly gets contaminated with air-borne dust including inorganic material such as mica. You will read quite a lot that this forms a kind of grinding paste. Yes, is the answer, in my view the clock needs disassembly and washing in something like white spirits or paraffin or a proprietary equivalent. Particular attention to bearing holes and bearing surfaces. Just a note but your clock is fingerprinted. To prevent further fingerprinting, consider wearing disposable nitrile gloves when handling metal surfaces. If the clock is going to be static i.e. not working. The tarnish on brass components under regular domestic environments i.e. relatively warm and dry, forms a passivated layer, so although over the years, the tarnishing will gradually get darker, unlike rust on iron/steel, it will not consume the components. It also looks like (difficult to tell from photos) some of the pivot holes are worn. If the clock is being serviced, your watch/clockmaker will be able to check depthing and if necessary, bush some bearings to optimise centre-distance between mobiles. Hope this helps and good luck!
 
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lacho1674

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Sorry to answer a question with a question but it really depends what you mean by clean? Might be an idea to begin by asking what you want to do with the clock? Do you want to run it or is it effectively a static object? if you want to run hot all the time or even occasionally, it might be useful to mentally split the clock into working and non working surfaces. A bit like a car there are bearing surfaces and working surfaces and if you like the chassis. The chassis of your clock is the clock frame (plates and pillars) and all the other non-working surfaces. sounds a bit extreme but all these working surfaces in place. If a clock is to work 'safely', it is the bearings that need to be 'clean'. This can only be achieved by disassembly and washing out those bearings. Once the clock is re-assembled with new lubrication, the oil slowly gets contaminated with air-borne dust including inorganic material such as mica. You will read quite a lot that this forms a kind of grinding paste. Yes, is the answer, in my view the clock needs disassembly and washing in something like white spirits or paraffin or a proprietary equivalent. Particular attention to bearing holes and bearing surfaces. Just a note but your clock is fingerprinted. To prevent further fingerprinting, consider wearing disposable nitrile gloves when handling metal surfaces. If the clock is going to be static i.e. not working. The tarnish on brass components under regular domestic environments i.e. relatively warm and dry, forms a passivated layer, so although over the years, the tarnishing will gradually get darker, unlike rust on iron/steel, it will not consume the components. It also looks like (difficult to tell from photos) some of the pivot holes are worn. If the clock is being serviced, your watch/clockmaker will be able to check depthing and if necessary, bush some bearings to optimise centre-distance between mobiles. Hope this helps and good luck!
Thank you about your complete answer , i was wondering because last year was serviced
 

jmclaugh

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It doesn't look what I'd call dirty but it isn't pristine clean. Does it run?
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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In which case, with low-power magnification, look into the bearing holes and look for evidence of clean looking lubrication (there doesn't need to be much so you may need to wiggle the wheels a bit to see it). If there is none or the lubrication looks contaminated (black/green etc), then you may have a problem.
 
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howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Sounds good! If there is visible lubrication in the bearings I'd say it is ok. Clock slowing down a bit is escapement error as the spring runs down. Normal behaviour.
 
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MartinM

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Someone used a punch to close up the worn hole near the patent stamp. The current standard is to insert a bushing in worn holes.
 

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