Introduction and Waltham 1884

GaryWoodward

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Jan 26, 2021
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Hello All -
I'm new to the forum - posted a thread about a Vanguard "Sidereal" watch earlier.
So a brief history - My dad gave me a dime store PW which I loved as a kid, then later I was mesmerized by one of his friend's collection which included some beautiful repeaters. Maybe 30 years ago I started collecting with my first RR watch - a Waltham Vanguard. Once when playing a music festival (I am a flutist) in Eugene, OR I happened into Anderson Watchmaking. Some might say that was a mistake. Marc Anderson has been wonderful to me both as a friend, watchmaker, and as someone who always had (has) great stuff for sale.
Now around 20 watches have followed me home - many are Waltham Vanguards (I like the wind indicators!) and a couple of Waltham 1884 5-minute repeaters. I have gravitated toward Waltham's since for years I stared at the Waltham clock in my dad's '41 Ford as I was growing up. And for quite a number of years the factory for my preferred flute maker (Powell) was housed in the former Waltham factory.
Today I have some questions about one of the repeaters.
It is in an OF Wadsworth case with a nicely finished slider - all looking quite "authentic." Would this have been common - putting a movement meant for a Hunting Case in an open face case? Assuming the movements were sold separately could someone have ordered the watch this way? Below are some pix.
It's been wonderful exploring this site - seeing so many amazing creations and being blown away the knowledge, wisdom and camaraderie here. Looking forward to much more!
Gary
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topspin

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Dec 14, 2014
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A movement meant for a hunting case that's in an openface case is called a sidewinder. 9 times out of 10 when you see this it's because somebody just plonked a spare movement in the first/only case where it would fit. But there were some "original sidewinders" too. Sidewinders are generally not well liked although they do have their fans even now.
 

GaryWoodward

Registered User
Jan 26, 2021
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Gary, what's not to like about a repeater.
I'm not sure! ;)
Yes, I've heard the "sidewinder" term used with an askance look, but this case is so nicely made it makes me think the OO wanted it that way. Might have been a financial decision - like buying a 6-cylinder Mustang. I'll probably go with that so I can sleep at night. Speaking of which, it is kinda fun hitting the slider in the middle of the night!

PS - are these "1884s" or "1888s?" The Waltham Serial Number lookup calls it an 1884 but the patent is from 1888.
 
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richiec

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Feb 24, 2007
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1884, Gary. The 1888 plate layout is totally different. I like the 1884 movements and have a few, no repeaters though. I buy most of them for the cases in case I find a good movement. And I own a 2014 V-6 Mustang, 305000 miles, 305 HP, I did have a 1965 200-6 cylinder convertible, great car, 25 mpg, fun to drive, the newer one gets 30 mpg on the highway and about 26 city and has only needed normal maintenance except for a transmission noise at 124000 which Ford put a new unit it.
 

GaryWoodward

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Jan 26, 2021
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Hi Richiec -
Not to put down the newest V6 Mustangs they'd smoke my older V8s! I do have a '90 V8 closing in on 500K.
Don't mean to highjack my own thread, so let's talk cars sometime!
Thanks for the clarification on the 1884.
 

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