International Time Recorder Clock

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Scott Tzorfas, Jul 10, 2018.

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  1. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    I just purchased an International Time Recorder clock. It has two springs that drive the clock. There is no chime. When I wind it up it is very stiff. The clock will run well for around 18 hours and then it will stop. I notice that before it stops, the pendulum will get a weaker and weaker sound. The pendulum bob will swing with a lesser and lesser amplitude before it stops. However, the springs that drive the clock are still tight. I would think that a clock like this should run longer than 18 hours- and again, after 18 hours, the springs are still stiff. Please give me advice on how to fix this? Does it need new winding springs? If it does, where do I get them and how do I replace them? I am a novice to clock repair.
    Thank you,
    Scott
     
  2. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    Sep 27, 2005
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    Yes, it should run longer than 18 hours. I very much doubt that you need new springs. However, these are very tough springs indeed and, as you say, they are stiff to wind. Are you sure you are winding them fully? You need a T shaped winder to do it.

    I suspect that your clock is just dirty and/or worn and in need of an overhaul. Although these movements are relatively simple and the parts are large, so easy to handle, I am not sure I would recommend this as your first clock tear-down. However, if you are going to try, be very, very
    careful of the springs, make sure they are completely wound down before you do anything. Spring of this size can do you severe injury and also damage the clock if not handled correctly.

    JTD
     
  3. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    JTD- yes I am absolutely sure it is fully wound. I have a large, heavy winding key that came with the clock. How do I wind down the springs? Are there videos that will help me do this overhaul? How do I get started?
    Thank you very much,
    Scott
     
  4. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    First of all, it would help if you could post photos of the clock you have. There are various models and I don't know which yours is and/or how old. Has it still got the clocking-in mechanism and printer or has this been removed?

    JTD
     
  5. rickyn

    rickyn Registered User
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    Jul 7, 2009
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    Most of those clocks have stop works. Check and see if someone as them set wrong.Rick.
     
  6. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    As the OP has never done any clock repair before, I don't think he would recognise the stop works or how to see if they are set wrong. This is why I suggested he post pictures of his movement.

    JTD
     
  7. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    JTD and Rickyn. Thank you very much for your replies! I will post photos later on today. Yes, I think the recorder part is in tact. It has the clocking in mechanism- I am not sure about the printer. Thank you for being patient and helpful, and I will show you photos later tonight. I would like to fix this myself. The damn clock is so heavy, that to move it is not easy!!! It was a bear getting it in the house. I would hate to have to transport it to be repaired. I think overall, it is in good condition.
    Scott
     
  8. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    You may already know: If you aren't planning to use the stamp part of the clock it will run better and last longer with normal strength springs. .0165" springs will allow easy winding with a normal (though large) key.
    Willie X
     
  9. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    Willie- that sounds like a great idea. I will not be using the recorder, so if normal springs would solve the problem, then that would be great. I will provide photos later. I just need a reference or instructions on how to replace the springs.
    Thank you,
    Scott
     
  10. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    Replacing the springs at present will not solve anything. You need to find out why your clock is stopping when it does. Willie's suggestion applies when you have the movement running properly. We need to see the movement in clear photos - then perhaps we can either see what is happening or else help you to take it apart. The movement may need all sort of other things done and it is quite possible that there is nothing wrong with the present springs.

    Frankly, if you have never taken a clock apart before, this is not the one I would suggest you start on, but if you do, everyone here will be glad to help as much as possible. However, it needs to be done methodically and not piecemeal. Just replacing springs at this stage will not help. I don't mean to sound discouraging but I want you to have a successful outcome and feel pleased with what you have done.

    Please post the photos as soon as you can and you will get lots of help.

    JTD
     
  11. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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  12. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    willie -

    i have a similar movement/clock w/ a rementoir that winds up over a minute and then releases so the minute hand moves only once per minute.

    do you think i could replace the monstrous mainspring with a .0165" mainspring and have it wind easier and run a full 8 days (as opposed to the 5-ish i get now)?

    here's the thread and photos for mine: help identify heavy duty english movement and case?

    thx!
     
  13. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    JTD- I took your initial advice and really cranked the winding springs as best as I could. I thought I had it wound as tight as possible, but I was able to wind them even more. I now have the clock running strong and it has been 2 1/2 days. The left winding spring (you are facing the clock and it is to your left), is harder to wind then than the left. BOTH are very hard to wind, however. It would be difficult to wind the clock like this every time. I notice in the pictures above that the left winding spring is not as tightly wound as the right. Any way to make it easier to wind the springs? Any other advice you have would be appreciated.
    Scott
     
  14. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    These clocks are always tough to wind. Part of the trouble is that you haven't got the proper winder. The key you have did not come with the clock originally. You should have a large T-shaped winder (as I mentioned earlier). The ones I have had a shaft about 3½" long and a cross bar abut 4" wide. The key you have is much too small and does not give you sufficient power.

    If you look at Timesavers (www.timesavers.com) catalog # 10173 and 10065 (Time Clock Cranks) you will see the sort of thing you need. One of these will make the winding a great deal easier.

    JTD
     
  15. Scott Tzorfas

    Scott Tzorfas Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2014
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    JTD- thank you very much. Is there anything wrong with the left spring? Why is it not as tight as the right? Is it just because I can't crank it as tight as the right one?
    Scott
     
  16. JTD

    JTD Registered User
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    There is no reason to suppose there is anything wrong with the springs. If you wound one more than the other, then they will not be evenly unwound.

    JTD
     
  17. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    The springs are, or at least should be, identical. They are difficult to wind, even with the proper 'T' handle winder. The the ckick is designed this way in order to provide the necessary power to move the stamp every minute. Without the stamp they don't need any more power than any other time only tandem wind clock, like a S-T #10 or #41 configured for time only.
    Willie X
     

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