International Model 35

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by PlymouthPat, Apr 5, 2009.

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  1. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    #1 PlymouthPat, Apr 5, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2009
    I have an old International clock I am interested in restoring. I do not have a lot of clock repair experience but do have a lot of appreciation for the clock.

    The clock has a few issues. One of the cables snapped. Also, the pulley bracket at the top of clock bent and the pulley came off. I have the parts. I am not sure how this happpend. I bought the clock in the current condition. I think I can bend the pulley bracket back into shape and reattach the pulley. I am just not sure how to replace the cables ?

    I think the clock is powered by 110V but would like to know if anyone can confirm?

    I appreciate any hints anyone can give me. I am including a few pictures Thank you !
     

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  2. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Hi, Pat, welcome to the message board. If your cable has snapped close to the weight, you could reuse the old cable. It will just be a bit shorter, so you might want to also shorten the other cable to match.
    Changing the cable (something I have done) isn't too bad of a job, but there are a few things to watch for, such as ball bearings that will want to escape, and run and hide. Your clock will be 110 volts, unless you are not in USA.
    It also has an impulse accumulator on the bottom of the movement, which is used to advance slave clocks after an extended power outage.
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    PlymouthPat asks, "I think the clock is powered by 110V but would like to know if anyone can confirm?"

    You can confirm from the identity plate in the bottom of the case. It should have the data. Too, the plate on the electric wind motor will have a voltage specification.

    The accumulator feature won't operate and connected slave clocks won't function without additional direct current DC source in addition to the service voltage needed for the winding motor. If you have no need for attached slave clocks, then these masters are wonderfully accurate and maintenance free timepieces.

    Be aware of releasing the winding mechanism. The weights will fall unless removed by unscrewing the nut on the end of the cable.
     
  4. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thank you for the great suggestion, I will give it a try and report back
     
  5. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Hello,

    I am in the process of trying to reattach the pulley for the weight. I wanted to ask if someone could please give me some direction on what type of fastener to use to reattach the two pieces. I was looking at the other good pulley assembly on the clock and noticed the pulley assembly will pivot on the bracket when moved. I think this flexible movment is intentional and would like to try and reattach the broken assembly in the same manner if possible. I appreciate any direction anyone can offer.
     

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  6. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, it does pivot, but without taking mine apart, I can't tell what holds it, a pin or a screw. The top part should be tight enough to it that the pulley can't come off, but not touching.
     
  7. caperace

    caperace Registered User

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    Harold do you know where icould get a suspension spring for one of these units? i have one and it broke I took it out and cannot find it. i believe it had 2 pins in it to hang the pendulum on .

    Jim
     
  8. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Generally the replacement suspension spring for a Seth Thomas #2 wall clock is a satisfactory substitute for most IBM/International/ITR master clocks. Timesavers order number 10421

    The exception would be for clocks with an unusually massive pendulum bob.

    The cross pins may not be exactly as needed but replacement can be achieved with simple tools.
     
  9. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Does anyone know what type of faster to use to reattach the pulley to the bracket ? (see jpg below) It appears to be a little more than a simple screw. I appreciate any ideas. Thank you !
     
  10. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    I'll take mine down tonight to see what it is. I suspect whatever is on the left side, will be the same as the right, but my parts book shows a few different numbers right to left.
    Jim, the part number Les gave you will work fine. You just have to drive off one of the pins (it has a pin on the top and bottom).
     
  11. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thanks Harold, please do not go through to much of an effort. I am willing to work with whatever information you may have. I can chase this down. I am just not sure what to ask for or where to find. Thank you again, Pat
     
  12. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, I had a look at mine, without taking it apart. The left and right pulleys have the same method of suspension, just the brackets holding them are different shaped. You will have to figure out how to duplicate the left side.
     
  13. caperace

    caperace Registered User

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    Thanks Les and Harold, I'll order one today.

    Jim
     
  14. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Making progress. I fixed the bracket and re attached the weight today. The pendulum started swinging on its own but clock will not go. The latch to hold the weights is free. I have not powered it up yet thinking that it should run via the weights. Would be happy to listen to any advice as to what to do next. Thank you
     
  15. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    After looking at this some more, I am not sure the weights are driving the movement. The latch that holds the weights in position is released. I appreciate any suggestions. If I need to provide a better description, please let me know.
    Thank You
    Pat
     
  16. harold bain

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    Pat, it's hard to troubleshoot from a distance.
    With the dial off, what do you see? When you swing the pendulum, does the escapewheel move at all? Has the movement been serviced?
    When you say the pendulum started swinging on it's own, what did you mean? The weights do not provide enough power to start the pendulum from a dead stop.
     
  17. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    When I swing the pendulum the escape wheel moves, but not enough to let the verge ( I think this is the name of the part) catch the next tooth on the escape wheel. The key that holds the weights in place is released. It seems like the weights are not transmitting the power to the movement to make it go? The clock is level. I bought the clock as is, the movement looks clean. I am going to take the movement off in a few days when I have a little more time and see if I can see if something is binding. Thank you Harold and to everyone who has commented. I am learning a lot and having fun.
     
  18. itbme1987

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    Sounds like maybe the pallets are too close to the escape wheel?
     
  19. harold bain

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    Is the pendulum properly installed in the crutch fork? This is the only thing I can think of, other than a loss of power, if the escapewheel isn't moving.
     
  20. PlymouthPat

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    Working on the clock today. Pendulum looks like it is connected to the crotch fork properly. Removed the weights and removed the movement from the back plate. Pulled on the cables and they unwound freely. I moved the crotch fork manually and the escape wheel moves, but not enough for the piece on top to move to the next tooth in the escape wheel. Everything looks in order and the movement isnt too dirty. Could the accumulator be binding up the movement ? Any hints what to try next ? Thank you again.
     
  21. eskmill

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    Pat. You have indicated that the escape wheel does rotate slightly when the pendulum crutch is moved to-and-fro but fails to pass the next tooth.

    This with the movement removed from the main casting and first with the weight latch locking the weights so they don't drop.

    Do this. With a sharp needle, mark an outline around the top of the verge adjustment plate. (either front or rear) This so that you can move it back into exact position if needed.

    Next, loosen the screw holding the verge adjustment plate slightly, then loosen the screw in the oblong adjusting slot. Then slightly move the verge adjustment plate upward very slightly and snug the adjusting screw.

    Now, does the escape wheel rotate one tooth at a time when the pendulum motion crutch is moved to-and-fro? Check all thirty teeth for motion.

    Still doesn't rotate? Mark the other verge plate with a sharp needle and move both verge adjusting plates up high enough that the escape wheel is free to turn when you apply some rotating force to the large wheel in the direction to advance the hands.

    The escape wheel must turn freely and with no hesitation.

    You may easily remove the accumulator if you believe it is creating too much drag on the hands motion gear train.

    Let us know the outcome.

    It must turn freely
     
  22. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    When I moved the verge plate up slight it did not make a difference. I then moved it all the way up and I could turn the escape wheel. I turned it a complete revolution and then when I let go it back wound the same amount or so.
     
  23. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Eckmill, I wanted to say Thank you. If I need to post a picture, to help diagnose, please let me know. Thank you again.
     
  24. eskmill

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    Pat wrote in part: "When I moved the verge plate up slight it did not make a difference. I then moved it all the way up and I could turn the escape wheel. I turned it a complete revolution and then when I let go it back wound the same amount or so."

    Pat. There is some bind or force preventing the movement wheels and pinions from turning. That's why the escape wheel went backward when you released it with the verge raised up and out of the way.

    Did you have the movement off the casting when you observed this?

    If it was fastened to the main casting and the weight system locked, then the locked up mechanism is preventing the movement wheels from turning. On the other hand, if the weight system was unlocked allowing the weights to provide power, the the escape wheel would have spun clockwise about 85 mph with the verge raised up. And the weights would have lowered pretty fast.

    If I've drawn the wrong conclusion and you do have the movement held in your hands and your observation is that the escape wheel won't turn freely with the verge up and out of the way of the escape wheel teeth, then there's a bind in the gear train preventing the wheels from turning.

    Remove as much stuff off the movement while it is in your hands and off the main casting starting first with the accumulator. It is held on by the two hex shaped stud-screws at the bottom corner of the movement. There is no timing or critical adjustment in replacing the accumulator.

    Next remove the hands wheels and idler gear being careful to note the correct sequence of assembly and the presence of the tension washer-spring behind the minutes gear.

    With all that stuff off the movement wheels should turn freely with just the slightest amount of force from your finger on the largest wheels.

    If you have any notion of disassembling the movement by separating the plates, you should know that there are loose bearing balls that will get lost unless you're careful and know they're in the bearing that the second wheel runs on. It has a shiny steel bearing cup pressed into the brass plates.
    Gather up the balls and stick them back in place with cold vaseline or other grease.

    Let us know what the trouble is.
     
  25. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    I have the movement in hand, I removed the accumulator and raised the verge plates up, the wheel spins freely and moves the second and minute hand. I lowered the verge plates back into position, when I move the crutch fork, (by hand) the escape wheel moves "to" and "fro" but the verge does not grab the next tooth on the wheel unless I move the wheel a little bit with my finger. Do I need to do any more adjustments or can I put the movement back on the casting ?

    On a secondary note, the accumulator seems to turn freely now that it not on the movement.

    Thanks again,
     
  26. PlymouthPat

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    With the movement in hand, I am trying to adjust the verge plates to a point where the verge will catch the next tooth on the escape wheel reliably. Not having a lot of luck. Any hints, Thank you
     
  27. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Good News, mounted the movement and it works......very nice. Next problem, the weights are near the bottom and the motor only hums? does not wind the weights ? Any hints what to check next ? Thank you
     
  28. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Success! At least you've got it ticking again. But what was preventing the escapement from getting power? Was the accumulator stopping the works?

    Now you've discovered a new problem. The motor only hums and doesn't wind the weights.

    I cannot read the nameplate on the motor from your photo. Some were 24 volt direct current only others were 110 volts AC. If of English or European source, it could be 220 volts AC.

    I do note the motor appears to be the "universal" type. That is to say it is not an induction motor but more like those used on domestic vacuum cleaners having a wound armature excited electrically through carbon brushes.

    Do this: with power connected and the motor humming trying to lift the weights, give the motor a little assistance by trying to twist the rubber connecting link between the motor's right angle gearbox and the weight winding worm wheel. If it tries to run the works, the motor is probably OK but there's either a bind in the winding drum gears or the motor isn't getting full voltage or the motor is defective.

    Another possibility: if the nameplate indicates that the motor is designed for 110 volts AC AND 110 volts is being delivered to the connecting block just behind the motor, then there's a bind in the gear train part of the motor.

    You can test for 110 volts using an ordinary household lightbulb in a pig-tail socket if you're careful and don't have a volt meter.

    On the off-chance the clock was intended for England or Europe and was designed for 220 volts AND the motor nameplate reads 110 volts AC, then look over the wiring on the top of the clock case for a large resistor in the power circuit to the motor.

    Please let us know of your progress...you're batting a hundred so far. :):)
     
  29. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Great Scott !, success again, I put power to the motor this morning and it started winding ...... at times the motor ran a little faster and then slower again but wound the weights up. I removed power once near the top as I did not want to wind up the weights too far.

    How far should the weights wind up before the motor stops ? I am thinking there is still another probelm. When I originally started working on the clock, the cable pulley bracket at the top right was bent on one side, and the stirrup has seperated from the bracket. The cable was also broken on the same side. I am thinking at some time in the past the motor did not shut off and caused all this to happen.

    On a side note, to answer previous question, the motor says 110V.

    Any hints about what point the motor should shut off. I see a swtich at the top right, I am just not sure how it should work ?

    Clock is ticking right now. Sounds great.

    Thank you agian
     
  30. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Pat wrote in part, "Any hints about what point the motor should shut off. I see a swtich at the top right, I am just not sure how it should work ?"

    The switch you identified should control the motor on/off. My recollection is that the switch is tripped when the cable drum makes the required number of turns.

    Harold probably knows exactly how many turns it takes to operate the motor control switch. I only remember that the weights don't come all the way up and don't go down very far between winding. The idea is to provide several days operation of the clock with no electrical power.

    A note of caution. The motor is actually a gear head motor with a worm shaft and brass worm wheel. They MUST be adequately lubricated with grease. Many International/IBM master clocks are without the motor because the motor ran without lubrication for so many years that all the teeth are off the brass worm wheel. These parts are not replaceable and have to be salvaged from an existing master clock.

    I am pleased that we were able to guide you in your efforts to put the fine old master clock back in order.

    Good on you!:):):)
     
  31. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thank you Eckmill for all your guidance. Having fun and learning a lot.

    I would like to maintain the motor so it lasts.

    I see a brass knob that hangs verticle from the motor on the left side. Is this where I lubricate ? Any special type of oil.

    I also see 4 small screws on top of the gear box (top right). Do I remove the motor and remove screws to add grease ?

    Thanks again,
     
  32. eskmill

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    Pat said, "Thank you Eckmill for all your guidance. Having fun and learning a lot.

    I would like to maintain the motor so it lasts.
    I see a brass knob that hangs verticle from the motor on the left side. Is this where I lubricate ? Any special type of oil."

    That's an oil cup with a wick. Fill with light machine oil every five years.
    It lubricates the rear motor bearing.

    "I also see 4 small screws on top of the gear box (top right). Do I remove the motor and remove screws to add grease ?"

    Yes, the screws hold a cover over the worm shaft and the 72 tooth bronze worm wheel. Pack light grease in the cavity assuring that some can lubricate the front motor bearing. The grease should last for ten or more years. There is no replacement source for the bronze gear anywhere.

    The motor brushes generally don't need replacement. They are held in place by the small black threaded caps. They can be a replaced with similar graphite brushes obtained from a sewing machine service or small electric hand tool repair shop. They should last for twenty or thirty years of continuous use. You should have a "look" at the motor brushes when convenient. If they're less than an eighth of an inch long, they're likely to fail.

    Again, I suggest that Harold Bain, who used to service these clocks could likely give better advice on maintaining the motor. My own experience has been minimal and with two that were badly worn. One required reproducing the bronze gear at an unbelievable cost.


    "Thanks again"
     
  33. harold bain

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    #33 harold bain, May 21, 2009
    Last edited: May 21, 2009
    Pat, the broken cable and pulley damage indicates there is a problem with the shutoff switch, so use caution in winding.
    You will have to troubleshoot the fan gear that activates the switch, and the one tooth gear under it that moves it.
    The switch should move with a positive action when opening and closing. There is an eccentric stud on the center of the vertical arm that works the switch. This adjusts the switch action to give equal action from the spring whether open or closed. Be very careful, work without power. This switch cannot be easily replaced, but I have never seen one wear out.
    According to my service manual, when the weight cords are out full length, and the point at which they fasten to the drum is down, the one tooth pinion should be meshed in the second tooth from the end of the fan gear. This is if long cords are used. If short cords are used (for a ball pendulum) the one tooth pinion should mesh with the fourth tooth of the fan gear.Changing the number of turns of the cord around the drum has the same effect as changing the mesh of the gears. Under no circumstances should the top of the weights rise above the lower screw holes in the back casting.
    Sorry I didn't post this sooner, but I have been on holiday for a week.
     
  34. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thanks Harold, Welcome back, I hope you had a great weeks holiday

    I put power to the motor, with power kill switch in hand, and ran the weights up. It shut off right where you said with the weight at the bottom screw hole of the movement.

    Interesting, the cover for the switch on my clock is missing, this is the way I got it. It seems to still work OK.

    I also noticed one of the wires to the switch was almost severed a few inches from the switch. It was not cut through but the insulation was cut, almost like it got caught in something at one time. I wrapped it with some electrical tape for the time being.

    I plan on removing the motor to add grease to the gear box. I will take a closer look at the fan blade and switch at that time. What type of light grease should I use for the gear box? Where do I find it ?

    I am also thinking of replacing the cables. The one cable is shorter than the other and the weight on short side raises above the bottom screw hole.

    Any tips on how to go about replacing the cables.

    Thanks again,
    Pat
     
  35. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, although I have replaced the cables on mine, I pretty much did it by instinct and good luck (the manual doesn't give any help). The drum had to be removed, and the movement and weights. There are ball bearings to watch for that will be released when removing the drum. I use a good quality wheel bearing grease on the bearings and motor gears. The switch cover is missing on mine as well.
     
  36. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Hello,

    I am working on greasing the motor gears today. I removed the entire backplate as this seems to be the easiest way to access the motor.

    I am not sure which part of the gear assembly to take apart to access the gears. I see two possiblities.

    I noticed three small screws on top of the motor gear box. Do I remove these and remove the cover to grease the gears ? Does not appear to be an easy way to remove this cap on top? Guess I would have to try and pry it out somehow?

    I also noticed 4 capped nuts on the right side of the motor. Do I remove these to get at the gears ?

    Thanks for any hints, do not want to undo to much if I do not have too.
     
  37. eskmill

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    #37 eskmill, Jun 13, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2009
    attachment.jpg The place to add grease to the winding motor worm wheel/worm shaft gearbox is beneath the round cover over the worm wheel.

    Refer to your photo of the complete assembly. There are three screws holding the cover plate over the worm wheel. Remove the cover and add additional grease of the same kind as found inside the gear case.

    Don't remove the acorn nuts holding the motor end bell and gear case to the motor field shell.
     
  38. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thank you Eckmill and Harold,

    Making more progress. Greased the gearbox and changed the cables today.

    I am in the process of reattaching the weights. Should the top of the weights be even with the top of the pendulum when weights fully extended?

    This looks about right height but thought I would ask before cutting the cables to length.

    Thanks again
     
  39. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, I left mine long enough that the weight would hit the bottom of the case, but in that there are seldomly power interuptions that long, it really isn't critical. If you have a ball type pendulum, the weights will hit the pendulum and stop it before they bottom out.
     
  40. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Hi Harold,

    I am troubleshooting the fan gear. I wanted to clarify the position of the one tooth pinion with long cords. When refering to the second tooth from the end. Would this mean the second tooth from the bottom ? As shown in picture

    "According to my service manual, when the weight cords are out full length, and the point at which they fasten to the drum is down, the one tooth pinion should be meshed in the second tooth from the end of the fan gear. This is if long cords are used. If short cords are used (for a ball pendulum) the one tooth pinion should mesh with the fourth tooth of the fan gear.Changing the number of turns of the cord around the drum has the same effect as changing the mesh of the gears."
     

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  41. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    I think the fan gear is 180 degrees out of position in your picture, Pat.
     
  42. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    I think the fan gear moves clockwise when the motor is winding the cables.

    The cable drum moves counter clockwise.

    If I moved it 180 degrees, would I run off the end of the fan gear when winding the cables with the weights fully extended down ? Does this sound right ?

    I think the position in the picture is close (not exact) to how it was when I took it apart.


    I appreciate any ideas. Thank you
     
  43. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, I was just going by the diagram in my book, which doesn't say wound up or unwound. You can probably tell better than I can with one in front of you.
     
  44. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

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    Thank you Harold and Eckmill, you guys are the BEST !!!

    Fan gear is set properly, weights stop where the should, new cables installed and motor gears greased.

    Clock is running great !

    Motor sounds much better after greasing gears and adding oil to reservoir cup.

    I am going to let it run for a few days before reinstalling the face.

    Anything to keep in mind when setting the time ?

    Thanks again,
     
  45. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, always move the hands forward. If you are not running slaves, then that is all you need to worry about.
     
  46. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Pat, great to hear of your success with this clock. Post some finished pictures when you have it all back together.
     
  47. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

    Feb 1, 2009
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    Workig on setting the time, I noticed the minute hand is on a D shaft and will not move forward. Only moves forward under the power of the clock. The hour hand moves freely.

    To set minutes, is it a matter of stopping the clock and restarting when the minutes catch up to the proper time.

    Makes sense, just thought I would ask if there is a different way

    Thanks
     
  48. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    On the IBM master clock movement the hands are friction coupled to the center arbor. You should have no difficulty moving the minute hand manually if the motion works (hands gears) is assembled properly.

    Remove the knurled nut holding the minute gear on its idle stud so that you can remove the hour hand tube and gear. Notice the two-step cam on the back side of the hour gear.

    Notice when the hour hand tube and gear is removed, there should be a pair of levers that would have contacted the cam surfaces behind the gear.

    Now remove the minute hand tube and gear. Behind the minute hand tube and gear should be a thin fiber washer about an inch in diameter. Behind the fiber washer you should find a three-leg friction spring that has a hole with flat sides that engage a mating part of the center arbor.

    The three-leg friction spring turns with the center arbor and provides a friction surface against the thin fiber washer thus coupling the motion of the center arbor to the minute hand tube and gear. The nut on the center arbor holding the minute hand in place adjusts the amount of friction to drive the minute hand and gear.

    When replacing the hour hand tube and gear, be sure to lift the two levers that operate the hourly correction contacts and place the levers on their proper cam surfaces. The levers must not interfer with the gear. Note that the levers prevent the hour gear from turning backward.

    I believe that if you follow the above guide, you will discover the reason for difficulty in moving the minute hand forward manually.

    The attached photo has the motion works gears and the hourly correction contace levers in sharp focus.
     

    Attached Files:

  49. PlymouthPat

    PlymouthPat Registered User

    Feb 1, 2009
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    Thanks Eckmill, that worked like a Champ !!!

    I am attaching a couple of pictures of my clock. Wanted to give a big "Thank you !" to Harold and Eckmill for everything !

    I noticed the clock is running a little fast.

    How do I adjust?

    Thanks again
     

    Attached Files:

  50. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    #50 eskmill, Jun 26, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2009
    The pleasure of assisting you is ours Pat.

    I've seen the aforementioned problem first-hand several times. It's on account of not being careful and looking (staring) closely at the hands gears (motion works) when removing the face and hands.

    You observe your clock running "a little fast." That would indicate it's rate is faster than some time "standard."

    Your "standard" could be compared to a radio controlled "atomic clock," a reliable quartz battery clock, the clock on your kitchen stove, or exactly when TV stations change programs. Use one standard and stick with it.

    There's two categories of rate or measured accuracy of a timepiece....short time rate, meaning during one hour or one minute. Then there's long-term rate.....measured over exactly 24 hours or a week from Sunday noon to the next Sunday noon exactly.

    Get the long term rate adjusted and the short period rate will be as good as it can possibly be.

    Make your adjustment to the pendulum bob very carefully and write down on paper what you did and the exact time. Don't move the hands....instead just note on your paper where the hands indicated when you made the adjustment. Fussing with the hands, can affect the escapement and too, you never can be sure there's no slack in the minute-hour hand gears.

    The exception is one cited by IBM in the maintenance instructions. If the seconds hand isn't really a tight fit on the escape wheel arbor and will slip while the clock is running, IBM instructions allow you to stop the hand exactly at the top of the minute with your finger so that it is in synchronism with the standard being used. (I don't go along with the above but it's in the book so I hafta' mention it)

    (lower the bob to go slower, raise the bob to go faster)

    Before adjusting the bob up or down, first observe and note the span of the pendulum motion measured by eye on the beat plate. Then when re-starting the pendulum try to accelerate the pendulum carefully just shy of or slightly more than the span you observed before you stopped the pendulum.. In this way, the pendulum will assume its period by gravity within an hour or two. It takes a long time for it to recover from "artificial acceleration" by your hands.

    Gravity is the weakest natural force in known to mankind.

    Wait at least 12 hours to let the pendulum recover from being pushed by your hands, then compare your notes with the position of the clock's hands at exactly 12 hours after touching the pendulum bob adjustment.

    Normally, it takes about a month of observation and adjustment to get a precision clock like yours to get its long-term rate to less than fifteen-seconds a month variation. This assumes the clock is firmly attached to a sturdy wall and is free from being moved laterally even a tiny bit.

    Once you have the long-term rate where you want it, the short-period accuracy is as good as it can be.

    Be patient.
     

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