Interesting mainspring repair & Bushing question

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by aka, Nov 9, 2009.

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  1. aka

    aka Registered User

    Jul 3, 2007
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    I've never seen such a repair on strike side mainspring, interestingly it seem to work. The movement is not abused except the mainspring repair

    Can any one tell me how to bush this hole, which is almost at the side of the movement plate. I fear that the reamer will go out of the plate edge .
    There was a thread some time ago, but I cant seem to find that .

    Thanks
     

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  2. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Nov 4, 2002
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    aka, use a small bushing, then open up the hole to fit the pivot.
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I've seen mainsprings that have been dovetailed together like that. One side has a tongue, the other a groove and the one slips through the other and holds. Functional, but strange, based on the price of mainsprings. However, if you were reluctant to separate the plates, it's a way of making the clock function again :) That's probably a pretty old repair, and still holding.
    Do the pivot hole as Harold mentioned. The only other option is a Rathbun bushing, and you know how we love them (not!)!
     
  4. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Aka,

    This must have been a routine repair by folks that knew very well how to rejoin the two ends of a broken spring but were not equiped to take the movement apart and put it back together.

    I saw one that was put together with a #10 stove bolt. The thickness of the bolt's head plus two layers of spring and the nut was quite impressive, to say the least!

    Willie X
     
  5. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

    Dec 17, 2003
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    If you remove the original bush and fit a new one the same, it should not be a problem.
    Is the hole causing a problem? It doesn't look very worn to me, and it's only on the strike train.

    As for the spring "repair", least said the better! ;)
     
  6. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    If the hole is too badly worn to accomodate a small bushing of suitable size, you could make a "preacher", and braze the hole shut after cleaning up the area really well. Then use the preacher to re-locate the hole. I would think the owner would have to be desperate to have the clock fixed considering the likely state of the rest of the bushings, and the probability that you should probably replace both mainsprings.
     
  7. MShaw

    MShaw Registered User

    Sep 20, 2000
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    When I find these I open the hole enough to make it round and make a thin wall bushing. I have done this several times with no problem. Of course, if you do not have a lathe, you can use a small bushing and open it up as above.

    Malkin Shaw
    York, Pa.
     
  8. aka

    aka Registered User

    Jul 3, 2007
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    thanks every one, the hole is not so bad. I bought this clock on Ebay, and the first step is the clean and change the mainsprings.
    However, I've not seen a pivot hole so close to the edge, so I was asking my self, how would I bush a worn hole so close the the edge of the plate.
    Again thanks for all the tips.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    aka,

    When the wear is moderate, you can smooth up the arbor's pinion and then turn the original bushing 180 degrees. The clock will run another 50+ years and someone else can worry over making a bushing! I have a heavy pair of pliers with a slotted jaw that will turn the bushing with minimal marks.

    Willie X
     
  10. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    Mar 31, 2005
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    Dovetail spring repair was a common thing down here during WW2. New springs were in very short supply and repairers did whatever they could to keep their customers clocks running. That repair doesn't look very old though.
     
  11. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

    Dec 17, 2003
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    I'm with Willie on that - worrying about things that will probably never happen shortens your life expectancy! :eek:

    I see no-one has commented on my post about just replacing the bush, leaving the hole in the plate alone.
     

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