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Inside a g.boley headstock pulley

dave-b

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Jul 28, 2010
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IMG_20200801_164455_1.jpg IMG_20200706_183103_3.jpg I recently bought a G. Boley headstock with the usual chipped pulley, except this one had damage to all the pulleys making it un-repairable, and I could not budge the grubscrew. Luckily I managed to tap the spindle through the pulley. In order to keep some originality, I decided to turn off the original bakelite and replace it with acetal. The second photo shows what is under the bakelite. It was surprisingle rusty and more complex than Ithought it would be. The bakelite shell had turned against the left hand thread (m24 x 1.5) by about 30 degrees and sheared off the locking screw. You can see the marks my screwdriver made while trying to undo an imaginary screw, compared to where the hole is. I bored and threaded (my first left hand internal single pointed thread) I did not stick too closely to the internal contours, but took care not to remove too much material as some of the walls would only be 2mm thick after cutting the grooves. I drilled 3 shallow divots on the flat part of the acetal as keys and put on some epoxy adhesive before assembly. First photo shows final result.
 

wefalck

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Mar 29, 2011
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BTW, for some reason the bakelite pulleys were only supplied to the US American market. Over here, the pulleys were cast-iron on all the makes I am aware of. On some makes the pulleys had ground flat seating that butted against a ground flat surface on the headstock and in this way were used to control the play.
 

dave-b

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Jul 28, 2010
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Hi wefalck, I never knew that. For some reason I thought all European Boleys were bakelite . The only iron one I have come across is on a Boley lathe taking conoidal collets and with the M-style bed with central location bevels. I had presumed this was American.
Dave.
 

wefalck

Registered User
Mar 29, 2011
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In fact, I was not aware of those bakelite pulleys until the days of ebay, when I had access to the US American market. It seems to have been a speciality of Boley and Paulson, the latter I believe were actually made by Boley, who also exported unmarked lathes.

Lorch, Schmidt & Co., Wolf, Jahn & Co., Bergeon, Dixi, etc. all have cast-iron pulleys to my knowledge. At least I never saw a different one.
 

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