Inherited my Grandparents Clock

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Phillip Lamb, Apr 3, 2020.

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  1. Phillip Lamb

    Phillip Lamb New Member

    Apr 3, 2020
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    Hi

    I have recently inherited my grandparent's grandfather clock. I am 54 years old and they had it as long as I can remember, It has been transported the 250 miles to my house but I cannot get it to run. Unfortunately I do not know when it last ran.

    I can get the clock to chime when I wind the hands round to the quarter hour, half past, quarter to and on the hour. The clock is a Gustav Becker P112 serial number 2406232. It is my intention to have the clock serviced so it will run reliably.

    I am so proud to have been passed on this family heirloom that I can hopefully cherish and keep in the family for many generations to come.

    I have attached a couple of photographs. Any information anyone could give me about the clock would be really appreciated.

    Thank you

    thumbnail (3).jpg thumbnail (2).jpg thumbnail (1).jpg thumbnail.jpg
     
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  2. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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  3. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    Have you checked Beat Setting 101 ? This explains how to fix a very common problem with clocks that have been moved.

    You should still probably get it serviced if you don't know when it was last serviced. It is a high quality, nice looking clock that looks to be in great condition. It's a nice family heirloom - look after it well and enjoy it.

    Tom
     
  4. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Apr 25, 2005
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    Phillip,

    Welcome to the forum.

    By looks, I would guess your clock was made around 1920, but we have folks here who can identify the year of manufacture of Becker clocks based on serial number, location of manufacture and trademark. They should be along shortly to provide that information.

    Regards.
     
  5. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Based upon the serial number, the clock was produced in the middle of 1921.

    Kurt
     
  6. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    It's a lovely clock!
    The clock most likely needs servicing, but... if you take the movement out and put a small drop of oil on all the pivots on both the front plate and back, I imagine this clock will run. And then listen to it carefully to see if the ticks and tocks sound equal. As recommended above, (beat setting 101)
     
  7. Phillip Lamb

    Phillip Lamb New Member

    Apr 3, 2020
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    Thank you all very much for the advice and lovely comments regarding the clock. I have tried the beat 101 advice and think I have it balanced now. The rhythm is even when I set the pendulum going but slows to a stop and becomes uneven before stopping. Someone has advised spraying the mechanism with WD40. Is this a good recommendation? I will also try oiling the spigot etc. with light machine oil.
     
  8. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    WD-40 is highly NOT recommended around these parts. Light machine oil is temporarily acceptable. If it is gummed up with black/green colored goo, it will definitely need to get a tear down and cleaning. If oiling works to keep it running, I would not consider that a long term victory. The dirt that remains will accelerate the wear.

    Tom
     
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  9. Phillip Lamb

    Phillip Lamb New Member

    Apr 3, 2020
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    Thank you Tom

    I will keep away from the WD40. Maybe I will try some light oiling then get it in for an overhaul.

    Thanks again.
     
  10. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Here is a test I use to see if there is is a general power problem (as opposed to something else that might stop a clock at a specific point, like a bent tooth, hands rubbing, etc.).

    Start the clock and then lift the weight to allow the pendulum to swing freely. After the pendulum swing dies down a little bit, lower the weight to to apply power to the movement. If the pendulum amplitude increases, that's a good sign. If it does not, that usually means something is robbing power (dirty, worn pivot holes, no end clearance, etc.).

    Tom
     
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  11. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

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    If it is going in and out of beat and slowing to a stop it may need a bushing or 2 or it may have a bent escapement tooth or two. It sounds like it needs the attention of a clock repairman/woman.
     
  12. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    also... keep in mind that the goal is just enough oil, only for pivots (the ends of the arbors that hold the gears) that rotate 360 degrees... and nowhere else. can’t tell you how many times i’ve seen movements dripping with two much oil (or mystery substances)... all of which quickly gum up the works and collect particulate matter, etc.

    servicing makes all surfaces smooth and shiny and true... and then just the slightest bit of oil to make sure everything runs smoothly
     
  13. claussclocks

    claussclocks Registered User
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    Don't even leave a can of WD-40 in the same room with such a beautiful and high quality clock!!! :eek::eek:

    Repeating what has already been said, get it properly serviced and you will be able to pass it on to your children. That's a really nice clock
    By the way, the P112 refers to the pendulum length

    David P. Clauss
     
  14. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    As others have already said, never ever use WD-40 on a clock. It is not only bad for the clock, but it ruins cleaning solutions in ultrasonic tanks. If you spray a clock with WD-40 and then take it for service, you may get charged a lot more due to the repair main having to deal with the WD-40.

    JTD
     

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