Inherited carriage clock - maker, date unknown - help, please

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by bobisgr8, Feb 4, 2017.

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  1. bobisgr8

    bobisgr8 Registered User

    Feb 4, 2017
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    Hi all,

    first time poster.

    My wife inherited this clock when her Mom died last year. We had it cleaned, adjusted and repaired to running condition. Per the repairman's description: French Gilt Brass Grande Sonnerie Repeating Carriage Clock with Alarm Clock, made in the late 1800's; the clock has carry handle, repeat button, underside of the case with quarters only/silent/full striking sonnerie selection lever, enamel silver dial with Arabic numerals; twin barrel movement with platform lever escapement, striking with two hammers on a gong and a further hammer for the alarm. The case stands approximately 7.5" tall and 3.5" wide. The case is made of gilt brass with minor wear and intact glass sides.

    There is no signature but is there a way of identifying the maker? Is late 1800's a reasonable estimate for date of manufacture?

    Thanks in advance for any information.

    19th century french carriage clock-6.jpg 19th century french carriage clock-5.jpg 19th century french carriage clock-4.jpg 19th century french carriage clock-3.jpg 19th century french carriage clock-2.jpg 19th century french carriage clock.jpg
     
  2. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
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    Notoriously difficult to identify maker if you don't have any marks, and sometimes not easy if you do. We have one in the same case with the same handle but lacking the mask and with just a plain qhite dial and a repeat function. I have always thought of it as around 1900.

    To me, the style of hands and numerals on yours looks earlier than that.
     
  3. bobisgr8

    bobisgr8 Registered User

    Feb 4, 2017
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    Thanks, novicetimekeeper, for your comment. We were told, based on the design of the arrows, that the maker was likely Couaillet. Is that a reasonable surmise? Are the arrows on the clock you mentioned similar to ours?
     
  4. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
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    I only have the one, and no other real experience of them. A chap called Jonathan knows a lot about them, he might be along in a minute.

    Mine has different arrows and has script in English for fast, slow, and hands.
     
  5. jmclaugh

    jmclaugh Registered User

    Jun 1, 2006
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    The style of arrow can sometimes identify the maker and Couaillet is a good example of that but the one on your clock is doesn't match the design they used or any other I'm familar with but someone else may recognise it. Sometimes carriage clocks have a maker's mark on the front plate or elsewhere as opposed to the back plate but as you had it repaired I assume no such marks were found and it is quite common not to be able to identify a maker of these clocks.

    Anyway it is a lovely clock to have inherited and is a very nice example of its type, the style of case is called a Corniche which I understand was introduced about 1880, the pattern on the dial is very much in the style of the Art Nouveau period.
     
  6. bobisgr8

    bobisgr8 Registered User

    Feb 4, 2017
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    Thank you, Nick, and thanks for the comments, Jonathan. It is an attractive clock. It's a shame that it sat in a box in my in-law's closet for the past 40 years. But, it is running again now. I expect that we will keep it for a while but likely will sell it eventually.
     

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