Ingraham stops periodically

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Dave T, Mar 31, 2020.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    This clock came in from a shop for repair, and the owner died. The customer picked it up and brought it to me.
    It was fully wound, and all I did was start it and adjust the beat slightly. It ran strong and healthy for about a day and a half. Then it suddenly stopped as if it had no power. I let the spring down a few turns and it started right up again. Ran for a few hours and stopped again.

    So... I figure the mainspring is sticking. (Strike side works fine.) I proceeded to tear it down, clean and inspect. Didn't find anything unusual or worn badly. Thoroughly cleaned both mainsprings, even though the clock was not very dirty at all, including the springs.
    Put it back together, oiled it and it's performance is the same as before. I did hear a small "pop" once when I tried to start it, and it did (start).

    It does have three Rathbun bushings..but they appear to be installed properly, as Rathbun bushings go.
    But one thing I notice about them is that the pivots extend to the outer edge, as if someone might have installed some longer pivots. In other words, the pivots protrude through the plate and to the outer edge of the bushing.
    Not sure any of that makes a difference, but just an observation.
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I would suspect maybe the verge is on the border line between being fine and being too close. I'd move it just a tiny tiny bit, and see if that takes care of it. You might also look at the teeth of the EW to be sure one or more didn't get bent. The other repairman likely had it cleaned and probably added those awful bushings too .... but they usually mean it was not disassembled.
     
  3. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2008
    4,850
    575
    113
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Pivots that are too long usually don't cause problems. Maybe a bent tooth or a worn lantern pinion? Also, a pivot that is too short could cause a problem when it is tunneling into the plate and gets stuck there.

    Uhralt
     
  4. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    A "pop" often indicates a bad (or missing) wheel tooth or pivot trundle.

    The Rathbuns need to go; sometimes they weren't even necessary in the first place! Check the pivot holes and re-bush as necessary when you take it apart to check the wheels and pinions. Your problem is probably going to be in the lower half of the train.

    American clocks had extra long pivots. This is why you only see Rathbuns on American clocks.

    The springs will be fine as long as there is no pitting from rust or cracks.

    Willie X
     
  5. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Shutt, Not sure I understand what you're saying here. How can I move the verge on this type escapement?

    I do see some solder on one trunnion indicating a previous repair.

    One of the trundles has two opposing longer pins above the retaining cap.?? But it's in the strike train. Shown here above the center wheel.
    Ingraham Stan Talton 1.jpg

    The original bushings under the Rathbuns don't look bad at all. Didn't want to rebush, but looks like I'm headed that way. This is just another clock I'm doing as a favor. Folks are beginning to bring me there old dirty clocks that have been sitting for years, but don't want to spend any money!
    Might have to change my policy!
     
  6. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    It's an Ingraham so look very carefully for a cracked cannon pinion. Gilberts are known for this but I have actually seen more cracked Ingraham cannon pinions. If this has the Ingraham half-deadbeat escapement be cautious about adjusting the verge depth. Unless it is so close that it almost snags EW teeth I woul dleave it along lest you introduce a second problem - you did say that it runs strong when it runs so unless it is snagging teeth it should be OK.

    RC
     
    Dave T likes this.
  7. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    Those two extended trundles (in the strike train) are normal. They drive the count-wheel. g

    If you are starting out, it's propaply best not to charge to much, but if you intend to make it a business, you will have to drop the hammer eventually.

    Baby needs a new pair of shoes, Willie X
     
  8. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Since I'm an amateur, I don't charge anything, and I tell the customer/friends that before I take it in.
    It's like everything else, the more you do the more you learn, but I don't have an adequately equipped shop. Although, I have gathered quite a few tools by now.
    This forum and you guys are my best resource. I can't thank you all enough for the help you so generously provide.
     
  9. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Here's a short video of the clock as it is, after I re-assembled it. It runs strong when it runs. Been running all day so far, no problem.
     
  10. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    When the clock stops, lock the escape-wheel and mark all the time side wheel/pinion mesh points with a sharpie pen. Then restart the clock and wait till it stops again. Lock the escape-wheel again and check all your marks. When you find the marks that line up, you are looking at the problem area. I will add bent arbors and pivots to the list but they don't normally make a popping sound.

    When the clock stops on its own, use a small screwdriver to see if all the gears (to do with the motion works) are free to wiggle around at the slightest touch.

    Sometimes a mainspring (with many cracks) can make a popping or snapping noise when the cracks catch and release as the main-spring expands. This is not common.

    Willie X
     
    Dave T likes this.
  11. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Willie,
    Good ideas, I'll keep my eye on it.
    I'm pretty sure we can eliminate the mainspring. They looked good before I cleaned them.
     
  12. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 29, 2007
    1,284
    11
    38
    Male
    Sales & Marketing Manager
    Canal Fulton,OH
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Check to make sure you have endshake on each wheel. Good advice above, I would also look for a bent pivot. One of the checks I do before complete assembly is to install two wheels at a time and check for free play, starting with wheel no1. Go through the train and keep checking the next wheel. By checking I mean slight pressure with your index finger to spin and checking for end shake. If you do this you can confirm the train is in good shape. Another visual is when you give it a bit of a spiin look to see how it stops. Too quick will indicate drag. BTW if working on the time side, leave the chime train completely out or visa versa.

    Keep us posted
     
    Dave T likes this.
  13. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The verge position looks good, so don't change it. If it is snagging a tooth, it will be because of a size issue, not a depth issue. It would be great to see it stop, but since it's random it would be pretty fortunate to get a video of it.
    It may just keep running now. Sometimes the pivots just need time to adjust to new bushings.
     
    Dave T likes this.
  14. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, did you check for a cracked cannon pinion? This is located on the center shaft and is hard to see with the clock assembled. This can sometimes cause the clock to stop and may also cause the minute hand to be easier than usual to move when the clock is set. If the marked gear test does not reveal the problem, be sure to inspect the cannon pinion when you have the movement apart.

    RC

    Ingraham cracked-1.jpg Ingraham cracked-2.jpg
     
    Dave T likes this.
  15. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    24 hr update. The clock is still running.
    Initially when I first started it after servicing, I try to give it only a couple of winds. Figuring if it's okay it will run with minimal power. And it did run for a day or so. So, I gave it 6 or 8 winds, and it ran for a while, stopped. I re-started it and it's still running 24 hours later. (The spring retainers are still on it.)

    I've tried to practice all the tips posted here. Check the gears free play with two or three gears at a time. Let it spin and see how long it freewheels. Look for bent pivots, cracked cannon pinion, etc. Everything looked good to me.
    I'm going to let it run now until it stops again. If it runs for 3 or 4 days, I'll take the spring retainers off and give it a full wind.
    Will keep you posted.
     
  16. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I would take the spring retainers off now and give it a full wind. You can always put them on again if needed. Sometimes as the spring unwinds it can cause the retainers to press against the 2nd. arbor. Best to do final test the way it will be expected to run. However, unless you can explain why it did stop unexpectedly that time, I would predict that sooner or later it will do the same thing.

    RC
     
    Dave T likes this.
  17. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    10-4! Retainers off - full wind - Day one!
     
  18. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    That little spur gear that RC mentioned is always suspect in these movements. It's also very easy to test. Just wiggle the minute hand in and out, it should flip back and forth easily and seem quite loose, with about .015" freeplay. If it seems snug or tight, thar's yer problem.

    Note, this test can be done at any time. These parts are always separated from the forces within the time train. Both the hour cannon and the minute hand shaft should always be loose, with easily noticeable end play.

    Willie X
     
  19. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I'm not sure exactly what the little spur gear is, but if we're talking about all the gears on the minute wheel and the hour hand cannon, (that RC shows in his post #14). These parts are free as you describe. These parts are a little loose as you mention.
     
  20. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The cannon pinion is under that wheel shown here with the up-turned finger teeth. You cant see it in the picture, and is hard to see while the clock is together. Another possibility is that the coils of the main spring can sometimes hang up on the end of the click rivet or end of anything protruding from the back side of the main wheel. It is generally a good idea to push the loop end of the main spring away from the wheel toward the movement frame. With the clamps off the spring may center itself better, but if the end loop isn't up against the frame or close to it, wait until it runs down some then push the loop end toward the frame (away from the gear). Spring coils snagging on stuff on the back side of the main wheel can be hard to catch because it is often an intermittent problem.

    RC

    ing-cannon-pinion.jpg
     
    Dave T likes this.
  21. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    RC, Right... I know what the cannon pinion is, and I have looked at it closely. I'm sure it's fine. Just never heard it described as a spur gear.
    And I just checked the spring loop ends. The strike side loop was dangerously close to the gear, but not touching. I moved it to the back of the frame where it belongs. Time side looks fine.
     
  22. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    The little "spur gear" is the widest gear in the clock and has 14 (?) teeth. Look at RC's excellent photos in post #14. This little gear is behind and next to the hour cannon's thin/larger gear but not attached to it. The little spur gear, in question, is directly attached to the hour hand shaft only.

    Willie X
     
    Dave T likes this.
  23. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Okay Willie, that's what I thought you might be talking about initially, but it isn't pictured in post #14 and I misunderstood.
    Anyway, that gear does have proper freeplay as mentioned.

    And the clock is still running strong with no intervention so far.
     
  24. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 29, 2007
    1,284
    11
    38
    Male
    Sales & Marketing Manager
    Canal Fulton,OH
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Just a note after reading the post above,

    FYI a while back I had a time only Ingraham that had this cracked cannon as shown in the post above (see below) . I have fixed several of these in the past by carefully soldering back together.

    497501-8bc3f9047ec3311bc8a01503f0ba685f.jpg



    This one for some reason had spread just enough that when I soldered it changed the tooth profile and of course would lock up. It took a bit of easy filing and scrapping to get it right. It has been running for months.
     
  25. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    12,774
    984
    113
    Just soldering the gap won't fix it.

    First the larger gear along with the tension spring washer and collar need to be moved back on the shaft about 1/4". Then, with the small gear removed, the gear and shaft need to be well cleaned. I always pass a small jewelers saw through the crack. Then the gap is closed with hemostats or twisted iron wire. Then the gear and shaft need to be filed/broached/sanded to get a snug slip fit onto the shaft. Then the gear has to be carefully positioned on the shaft in exactly the right place before soldering. End play needs to be about 15 thou. Finally, flux and solder the gear onto the shaft using the jeweler's method of soldering. It only takes a small piece of solder. About a 3/32" bit of ®Tix size solder will do it. I sit the shaft vertically and place the bit of solder where the crack meats the shaft. Use a small brushy flame from underneath, play it around opposite from the solder. The solder should flow instantly. Remove the flame quickly. Clean the whole piece with Windex and a toothbrush, rinse, dry and you're done.

    Willie X
     
    Dave T likes this.
  26. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #26 Dave T, Apr 2, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2020
    Clock is still running strong.
    But during the process I attempted to adjust the strike lever for proper contact against the gong.
    And I've managed to move the 'center' lever in the picture, that rides on the lift pins of the 3rd wheel. (Probably haven't named these parts correctly)
    But, these levers are adjustable, and now I can't get proper lift on the hammer lever. The middle one in the picture, that rides on the two pins of the 3rd wheel.
    Ingraham strike lever.jpg
    This is a spare part. My clock is still assembled and running.
    For what it's worth, the half hour strike is okay.

    Here's a picture of the hammer lever as the pin just starts to lift.
    Ingraham strike lever 1.jpg
     
  27. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    It looks like it's a friction fit. I think you can adjust it while it's in the movement. Hold the arbor while applying pressure to the lever. It should move into the correct position for you.
     
  28. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks Shutt, I've been doing that, (adjusting in the clock) But I haven't got it right yet. The picture I've shown (where the hammer lift rides on the two pins of the wheel) lifts just enough to barely raise the hammer from the gong. And the strike is very quiet.
    And I've moved it on the arbor several times.

    But the thing is, it was right when I started the repair. And I messed it up by trying to adjust the strike hammer. It was too close to the gong.
     
  29. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You'll get it. Little changes make big differences in how it acts. Things like this will test your patience ;)
     
    Dave T likes this.
  30. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Yep I did get it. Finally got back to it today.
    Half the reason I couldn't sort it out, finally occurred to me this evening. I checked the gong and it was a little loose but not much at all. One half turn on the bolt holding it to the bottom of the case made it sound sooo much better.
    Then, I could adjust the levers on the arbor accordingly.
    Can finally get another one out of the house!
     
  31. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    This clock came back today, and the owner said it just stopped! It was running well when I returned it to him.
    But when I took the dial off I found the time mainspring nearly completely unwound.
    So, I wound it up tight, and it ran great... for about 4 hours. Then stopped again.

    So, off comes the dial again, and I see it's not getting any power. I tried to apply a little pressure to the 3rd wheel, and WHAM! the spring click released and I nearly jumped out of my chair. Lucky I didn't lose a finger.

    I looked up this post to see what my history was on it, and the first post makes more sense now. This is obviously what's been wrong with it all along.
    But the ratchet looks good and so does the click. I'll tear it down and post some good pictures.
     
  32. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Yikes! I'll bet that woke you up :)
     
  33. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #33 Dave T, Jul 25, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
    I've got this clock apart again. And I can't see what the problem is. As I said earlier, the clock stopped and had no power. The spring click broke loose when I tried to apply pressure to the 2nd wheel to see if the clock would get power to run.
    I do see some wear on one side of all the teeth.. as well as the strike side.
    Can't see any way to improve the click or ratchet better than what it is.

    So my main question is: Why did the spring break loose, and how do I correct it?

    Ingraham Kitchenette Stan Talton TS mainwheel.jpg
    Ingraham Kitchenette Stan 1 Talton TS mainwheel.jpg Ingraham Kitchenette Stan 2 Talton TS mainwheel.jpg
     
  34. Evernia

    Evernia Registered User

    Jun 12, 2020
    48
    8
    8
    Country Flag:
    Isn't that clickspring all wrong? I would expect it to be longer and going the other way round the winding arbour.
     
  35. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    No the click is proper, at least that's the way several others I have are, and the Strike spring is the same way.

    BUT, I found the real problem. 2nd wheel has missing and bent pinions. And the arbor is bent inside the pinion. This wheel shows that somewhere in the past pinions were soldered in on the opposite side.

    So now I'm wondering if this was the main issue or collateral damage when the mainspring broke loose.

    I do have another 2nd wheel I can use, but if I put it back together will it happen again?
    Ingraham Kitchenette Stan 2nd wheel.jpg
     
  36. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The damaged pinion is collateral damage and also a main issue. If the spring, spring hook, click, click rivet, or click spring fail then it will happen gain. Fix these parts properly and the chance of another failure will be minimal.

    RC
     
  37. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks RC, I can't say I could disagree with that advice, but I can't find anything wrong with the mainwheel components. Except for the worn teeth, and I don't know how much of an issue that is.

    I found a duplicate 2nd wheel that looks good. I have the movement back together, without the anchor, and I've wound it up 5 or 6 times and the train runs free.

    What else should I be considering?
     
  38. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Okay boys, back in operation, running like a sewing machine!

    Just waiting for the next explosion!!! :)
     
  39. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    43,484
    1,241
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    There's a good chance that the trundles were the problem, and you missed them in your initial repair. The symptoms seem to point that way.
     
    Dave T likes this.
  40. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Yep that's what I think. And must have been the problem from day one. As I think I mentioned, there was solder on the undamaged side of that trundle, indicating previous repair.
    I've got it running steady now for several days, no problem. I'm going to let it run clear down before I turn it loose.
     
  41. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2008
    4,850
    575
    113
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    It is also possible that the click didn't move freely on its post. I might have been stuck in an open position.

    Uhralt
     
  42. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I examined all the components of that wheel, and it all looks to be in very good condition.
    I will say that when the spring 'broke loose' the click was relocated out and away from the retaining spring for the click.
     
  43. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    This clock is beginning to quickly get in the "high maintenance" category. It stopped again.
    NO POWER TO THE EW. I haven't touched it yet and don't think I will until I suit up with all the protective gear I can find. :)

    Not sure how to proceed, but I'm going to mark the wheels and take a picture before I touch it.
     
  44. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    If the hands are on the clock, the first thing to check is that the minute hand is not hung up on the hour hand. Marking each wheel can be helpful. There are several ways to proceed but before moving anything not whether the strike train has gone into warning or is about to. You can go top down or bottom up checking each wheel for power. A wheel that will freely rock back and forth has no power. Look carefully at the wheel(s) with worn teeth. Could be a bent lantern trundle hung on a damaged worn tooth.

    It is an Ingraham so inspect the cannon pinion, these are prone to cracking.

    Another problem with Ingrahams is with the flat lifting levers in the strike train. Make sure that all the edge surfaces are smooth and free from ruts and worn places. I have one of my own that drove me nuts for months until I finally tracked it down to worn levers in the strike train that were overloading the time train when it was going into warning.

    RC
     
  45. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks RC, That's the kind of information I was waiting on before I proceed.
    All I can tell you so far is that the minute hand only is on it, without the dial, so I can observe it. And, the minute hand is approaching the half hour mark.
    I'm pretty certain the cannon pinion is or at least was okay. I've looked at it very carefully.
     
  46. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    A little more information.
    I checked each wheel from the top down. All wheels are free, (no power) until I get to the 2nd wheel. That's the one I replaced. It's locked tight.
    And, the minute hand won't advance without force. The strike hammer is also tight.
    Looks like there is or might be a problem with a lifting lever in the strike train? Not sure how I will spot it.
     
  47. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Studied this clock for a few minutes. If I apply a little pressure to the minute hand the clock runs. So after a bit, it will keep running and is running now, but the minute hand is not moving.
    This should be obvious to me, but I don't know what the problem is. But it definitely has to be a lever tight against the center arbor somewhere.
    The movement is in the case and difficult to see.
    I'll try to take it out the way it is and mount it on a stand.
     
  48. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #48 Dave T, Jul 29, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
    Found the problem. The mainspring tab to prevent interference with the strike lever was bent outward when the spring broke loose after the 2nd wheel pinions came out.

    Now it's interfering with the strike lever. The clock runs fine until the spring is about half relaxed, And then it expands toward the strike lever and prevents striking and the minute arbor to continue running.

    So, I wound it up to take the pressure off that tab to inspect it, and it's as good as broken off already. It's cracked badly and about to fall off.

    Is there any solution for that? Replacing a spring tab stop.

    Ingraham strike lever 2.jpg Ingraham strike lever 3.jpg
     
  49. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
    10,340
    872
    113
    Male
    Trappe, Md.
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You have several options depending on how pretty you want it to be. You can brake the tab off completely, leaving a hole. Then get a piece of scrap metal and form a new tab that will poke through the hole from the back of the plate (make the hole a bit larger) then bend the new piece 90 degrees against the back of the plate and solder it in place on the back of the plate. If you have a lathe you can turn a steel post with a little shoulder at the base, then drill a hole close to where the broken tab is and rivet the new post in place.

    RC
     
    Dave T likes this.
  50. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    3,126
    110
    63
    retired
    NC
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Which would be easier to rivet, brass or steel? Right now I'm inclined to rivet, using this brass flat sided taper pin.
    I'd drill a hole large enough to drive it in to almost flush and hammer it down/over.

    brass taper pin.jpg
     

Share This Page