Ingraham is missing all pendulum-related parts

Bkeepr

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Jul 8, 2020
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Hello everyone.

I just acquired an Ingraham Colgate which has no pendulum parts at all-- no suspension spring, no pendulum leader, and no bob. It is a 1921 Ingraham movement, and is the only one I have so there's nothing to compare it to. (2 pictures att'd, first just shows the missing parts, the other is the complete movement)

Can anybody suggest a source and item #s for the missing suspension spring and leader, or else provide instructions and measurements so I can fashion a new spring and leader? I have found sources for the correct Ingraham bob in other threads, so that's easy. I am very new to watch repair, but have been reading, am mechanically inclined, and experienced with other types of machinery.

I'd really appreciate any advice, information, and tips you can give me. Thanks!

Ingraham 1921 movement missing pendulum spring.jpg Ingraham 1921 movement.jpg
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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Check Timesavers on line catalog: View Online Catalog
See page 96 and item #32804 in the left hand column as a representative replacement part.
The relative thickness of the suspension leaf is not critical but the length is. Good timekeeping at your skill level will be a matter of trial and error. It will be to your advantage to build some sort of stable movement stand in order to have access to the movement. You will have to cut the rough piece to some length and bend a hook for the pendulum bob. Start with the leader long, run the clock for three days+/- and adjust accordingly. (Shorten the rod a bit with each adjustment) This process will take multiple adjustments of the length and will probably take up to a month before good timekeeping is achieved. The suspension leader will be anchored in the fork that protrudes from the rear plate of the clock movement and pass through the loop on the crutch. The fit between the loop on the clock crutch and the rod on the suspension rod is critical. The rod cannot be trapped tight in the loop. There must be some clearance between the loop and the rod. That clearance should be the thickness of 1-2 sheets of normal copy paper.
To properly set the “beat” on the movement, it will be good to review the article on this board: Beat Setting 101 Thanks to Bangster for listing those articles.
Good luck with your clock,

Dick
 
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R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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You have to see what case it goes into. Make a leader and keep cutting it till it times out Is the fasts way.
 

Carl Bergquist

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Oct 27, 2010
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I just happen to have that exact movement on my test stand. I am trying to keep mine running for more that a couple minutes. The suspension spring and pendulum wire measure just under 3 1/2 inches from the dimple in the suspension spring to the bottom of the pendulum hook. The pendulum has an adjustment nut in the center of the pendulum and the clock has an adjusting wheel in the center of the dial. So I don't think the 31/2 inches is set in stone. Like others have said start a little long and if it will run it will tell you which way to go. I think that part of my problem is my suspension spring has been beat up a bit and my verge has ruts. Good luck. Your verge looks better than mine.
 

Dick Feldman

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The most common reason for 100+/- year old clocks not running is friction due to wear.
It is logical that a movement will wear in much less than that amount of time.
Many times when that age movement is seen, the most obvious flaw is not what made the movement stop.
If you replace the suspension wire and do all of that correctly, the movement may not be capable of running and be reliable.
With your repair, I would suggest you study wear in clock movements, as well as how to find and cure wear.
If a new pendulum leader does not make the clock movement run, do not be surprised or disappointed.
Best,
Dick
 

Bkeepr

Registered User
Jul 8, 2020
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Maryland
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The most common reason for 100+/- year old clocks not running is friction due to wear.
It is logical that a movement will wear in much less than that amount of time.
Many times when that age movement is seen, the most obvious flaw is not what made the movement stop.
If you replace the suspension wire and do all of that correctly, the movement may not be capable of running and be reliable.
With your repair, I would suggest you study wear in clock movements, as well as how to find and cure wear.
If a new pendulum leader does not make the clock movement run, do not be surprised or disappointed.
Best,
Dick
Dick,
thank you for the sage advice and the encouragement. This movement was re-bushed sometime in the distant past. Some of those are now worn, and several of the original pivot points are also worn. There is a lot of potential for hand-rebushing practice on this particular movement.

I'm sure I'll be asking more questions...thanks again to you, and everyone else who answered and advised!

Tom
 

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