Ingraham Clocks

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Steven Thornberry, Nov 5, 2009.

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  1. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    The Anchor and Adrian are so similar that without a label, it's difficult to positively it's one or the other. You just take your best guess. I wouldn't be surprised that they took identical clocks and alternatiely slapped on one label then the other. What customer would know (or even care). With the Adrian, however, the dates on the movement might provide a clue, since it was made over a longer period of time.
     
  2. Dch48

    Dch48 Registered User

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    Yes I wish it did have the label but alas, such is not the case. My Seth Thomas has most of the label still on it and is also dated at 1902 by the 2091 stamping on the bottom. ST is also plainly visible on the back of the movement. Ingraham didn't make it that easy unfortunately.
    .
     
  3. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

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    #103 Bruce Barnes, Mar 14, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
    Here is one that doesn't appear in the Ingraham book, movement and a different escape set up...........
    Bruce Ing gallery 2.jpg ING Gallery 1.jpg
     
  4. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I've always liked Ingraham "candy stripe" clocks. I recently acquired another that I thought I would share.

    It's virtuallly identical to an example I've previously posted on this thread here . I actually like the state of the finish on the recently acquired example a bit better, though the paint on the doors is a bit more worn. I also like it's equestrian themed glass.

    RM
     

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  5. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    Nice clock! Did they create that striped veneer by laying up strips of different woods or with the stain? If strips then those are some tight joints.
     
  6. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Very nice examples. I've acquired two of the Mosaics. One's a Grecian (not the candy stripe pattern) the other is a Front Doric which has the veneer "candy stripe" pattern. It's not nearly as nice as either of yours but I'm happy to have it. I really do like these clocks. Thanks for sharing.
     
  7. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Jay and "TimeAfterTime",

    Thanks for your interest and kind comments.

    The official name for these 2 is the "Mosaic Front Octagon Doric".

    For similar examples, please see Tran's "Ingraham" book pages 274-275, figures 873-876. All subsequent references to page and figure numbers in this posting are from this source.

    They apparently date from the 1870's.

    As a side note, on page 274, the "distinctive copper color" of the bob's used in Ingraham clocks of this period is discussed. That's exactly what came with both of these clocks so I believe they're original.

    It appears that they did use veneer to create the patterns. The inlay created can sometimes be much more elaborate than on these 2 clocks. For example, see the base of the Oriental on page 260, figure 813 and the catalog
    illustration of a Grecian Mosaic on page 258, figure 805.

    As far as I know, they're about as close to mass produced marquetry/parquetry cased clocks by an American maker.

    Cases of some of the "Anglo-American" clocks are sometimes inlaid as well.

    For a folk marquetry/parquetry non-factory example with incredibly complex inlay created by someone with time and skill, click here .

    RM
     
  8. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    I checked out your marquetry mantle clock,all I can say is WHOOOOOA!
     
  9. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    I see why you call it "marquetry/parquetry". By definition it would be parquetry but the intricate repeating geometric patterns superimposed upon the form of the case turns it into a piece of art. Probably not a significant clock maker in a commercial sense but definitely museum quality, in my opinion. Especially if the museum had an appropriate exhibit for it to be a part of. Thanks again for sharing.
     
  10. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    TimeAfterTime and Jay,

    Thanks again for your kind comments and interest.

    Happy to share.

    The person who made the case was most likely doing it for their own edification and enjoyment rather then as a commercial enterprise. By the way, as best I can tell the case was scratch built. It's not a black mantel covered in inlay. The maker used a form that was au courant at the time. They did use a great Ansonia dial and movement. That person had a real "eye"!

    For more about these clocks and "folk marquetry" as it's collectively called in the folk art world, see American Folk Marquetry:Masterpieces in Wood by Richard Muhlberger. This book was published in conjunction with an exhibition by the same name which ran from 1998-9 at the Museum of American Folk Art in NYC. There are are number of clocks illustrated (some real KILLER stuff). Some of them are derived from the same basic "black mantel" form as this clock. I might be a bit prejudiced, but I think mine is as good or better than those pictured therein and which were included in the museum exhibition.

    RM
     
  11. Douglas Ballard

    Douglas Ballard Registered User

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    I was glad to find this thread as I have a few Ingrahams and will post photos. My first clock was an "Adrian" and I started learning repair on these Ingraham black mantles. I have two "Raven" models I am restoring right now and one Doric style. Although quite "common" as far as mechanical clocks go they do have history and a certain charm.
     
  12. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    I think Elias Ingraham made his fortune selling Adrians,you see them everywhere,all the time. I'm on number three now and they've all been 1911's.
     
  13. Bruce Alexander

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    I agree Douglas. Our first Mantel clock was also an Adrian so perhaps I'm a little biased but I think that Ingraham movements were comparable to Seth Thomas in quality and construction. Obviously, they offered some beautiful cases as it was a large part of the Company's origin.
     
  14. Steve Rickard

    Steve Rickard New Member

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    Hi Dch48, I have an Adrian as well that my grandma gave to me many years ago. Mine was made in 1905 I want to redo the metal bits. Did you redo these on your clock? If so what did you use to do it?
    BTW My Adrian looks the same as Jay Fortner's. My Adrian has its lable so I would suggest yours might be the Anchor
    Thanks. Steve
     
  15. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #115 Steven Thornberry, Oct 22, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    This is the Empire, a clock that doesn’t seem to surface very often. So, I was happy to find one in decent condition at a decent price.

    Tran’s Ingraham book shows it from the 1881 catalogue, but with columns. Tran also shows a photograph of this model with candy-stripe mosaic sides. The 1880 catalogue (as reprinted in 1972 by Kenneth Roberts and the ACWM) shows the same catalogue illustration as the 1881 catalogue and adds that the Empire was offered from 1879 to 1894. The Empire has stylistic similarities to the modified Venetian models, such as the Idaho, the Baltic, and the Venetian No. 2, V.P. (so called in the 1880 catalogue and in Tran, who adds the No. 2 was offered 1874-1880). The Empire, however, seems to have been dolled up with a powdered wig (without the powder, of course).
    This clock might – just might – have the candy-stripe mosaic sides. However, the striping does not appear as “regular” as the candy striping I am familiar with on Ingraham candy-stripe mosaics. So, either, the stripes on this one have faded (or have been monkeyed with); or this is simply a model with a different sort of graining - but nicely done, IMO.

    The pendulum ball on this is one that I supplied, and is an actual Ingraham, down to the patent date on the back. The clock originally came with a pendulum ball that was similar to the Ingraham, but not as nice. On the subject of pendulums, I am not quite sure that this style pendulum is correct for the Empire. All examples I have seen, from catalogues or photos, show a single-barrel faux mercury pendulum. I suppose that what I have, however, could have been supplied with some of the Empires.
    The dial paper is a replacement, not badly done, and the rosette on the upper left scroll (or “log”) is missing. I will eventually have a replacement rosette made. For some reason, the verge wire loop was formed too long and rubs up against the dial, stopping the clock. Perhaps the verge is a replacement. If I leave the right hand screw out of the dial pan, the loop does not rub against the dial.

    The absence of a label limits any analysis of the actual production date of this particular clock. The movement is marked “E. Ingraham & Co.,” and does not contain the 1878/1879 patent dates seen on many Ingraham movements. That would place the manufacture date of the movement prior to 1880. The Ingraham company was called “E. Ingraham & Company” from January 27, 1860 to July 1880; “The E. Ingraham & Company” from July 1880 to sometime in 1884; and “The E. Ingraham Co.” from 1884 (dates from Tran). Possibly this clock is to be dated 1879 to early 1880’s; much depends on how quickly the older movements were used up.
    Empire 2.JPG Empire Movement 2.JPG Empire Striping 4.JPG
     
  16. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    Nice clock Steven. I'm thinking that one didn't have the stripes,looks like rosewood veneer. It does look like the verge/crutch was fabricated later in it's life,you can see where the guy clamped the crutch wire in a vise,still not a bad job,you could bend the wire inward just below the bottom crossbar then straighten up the loop,would fix your rubbing problem. That rosette would be an easy one to duplicate.
     
  17. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    Well, I finally got my Adrian(#3 that is)restored. I found in written that these clocks were enameled,they're not,they're shellaced and reflowing this one was a serious PITA. I did wind up spraying a coat of new platina on there before the wet sanding and buffing to keep from rubbing through the existing finish.
    This was my first attempt at faux marble.
    before and after 108.jpg before and after 109.jpg before and after 110.jpg before and after 111.jpg
     
  18. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #118 Steven Thornberry, Jan 17, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    I have had this one for a couple of years actually and just now decided to post it. I’ve never been quite capable of making up my mind about it.
    It is the Cabinet A, shown in Tran from the 1900 catalogue. The case seems to be in original condition. There is no label. Troubling are the dial and movement.

    The dial is nothing like what is shown in Tran, where a dial with a fancier bezel is shown. This one is quite plain and does not quite fit the space allotted on the door glass. Still, it looks well aged and fits the only two holes that seem ever to have existed on the mounting board.

    The movement, however, is another thing. Instead of a movement bearing a date somewhere around 1900, this one bears a date of July 1923 (7 23),which seems some 20 years too late for this clock. Again, to judge from the mounting holes, it could be the only movement ever to have been mounted in the case. But, one Ingraham movement is much the same size as another and mounting feet can be adjusted to pre-existing feet.

    In his introduction to Tran’s section on Ingraham black mantels, Chris Bailey states that some stock of discontinued models “were still on hand . . . and they were carried on price lists until this stock was depleted even though not shown in catalogs.” This statement was made in regard to black mantels but could, I suppose, apply equally well to other types of clock. But twenty plus years later? I dunno; 20+ years seems an outrageously long interval.

    But as Yoda said, “There is another.” This is a link to clock on flickr. (look quick before the pictures disappear). It is the Ingraham Cabinet C (per label), albeit with the top piece seen on the Cabinet A. The clock belongs to none other than our own Spaceman Spiff. Note the style of the dial (maybe a replacement dial paper?) and the date on the movement (December 1923).

    So, I’m not completely sure what to make of all this, but it keeps me up at nights. (Ok, it’s really the ghosties and ghoulies and long-legged beasties that keep me up at nights!)
    Cabinet A.JPG Cabinet A Movement.JPG Cabinet A Dial Mounting Holes.JPG Cabinet A Movement Date.JPG Cabinet A Dial Front.JPG Cabinet A Dial Back.JPG
     
  19. Douglas Ballard

    Douglas Ballard Registered User

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    When all is said and done, it is a nice clock with a lot of charm and character (it would look good in my living room).
     
  20. 1843lamp

    1843lamp Registered User

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    #120 1843lamp, Jun 7, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2014
    I actually posted this clock some time ago and have never seen another in graham like it attachment.jpg attachment.jpg attachment.jpg
     
  21. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Another excellent clock!!

    Great paint! I really like Victorian paint decorated cast iron.

    I've also owned iron fronts where the bezel had those extra tabs which covered the winding holes.

    Keep 'em coming.

    RM
     
  22. 1843lamp

    1843lamp Registered User

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    Rm,I am taking your advice while I can...I am getting the posting of pictures down as I make new posts ,next month I will probably have to relearn again,memory is not what it used to be better get things Done now while I can!
     
  23. 1843lamp

    1843lamp Registered User

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    #123 1843lamp, Jun 7, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2014
    Rm,if you could post any photos of the clocks you mentioned I and others would love to see them ,are any Ingrahams?,I have never been able to find another ingraham in this case style,if you or anyone else knows about one that would be news,I am trying to get the hands replaced and the non original pendulum as well,it seems no matter how original a clock I find they often have non original pendulums and hands.Anyone have information that can help .?I am confident in the type of hands it needs but the pendulum needs some verification.
     
  24. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Don't own the clock with those brass tabs on the bezel anymore. Think it was actually a Terry and Andrews rather than an Ingraham.

    Once they're gone, the pix get deleted to save hard drive space.

    No, don't have an Ingraham iron front but have seen others. The one I especially recall was @ an auction. More of a scrolled iron front, floral decoration rather than a scene like yours. I agree. Unlike other makers of that period, Ingraham didn't make many iron fronts. He was also a cabinet maker, a wood guy, so I'm not surprised.

    I'll try to find it in my auction catalogs. Will be a bit like searching for a needle in a hay stack...but I'm pretty sure it's there.

    And yes, keep them coming. It's so refreshing to have someone who likes nice stuff from THIS SIDE of the Atlantic.

    RM
     
  25. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Here is Rob's original thread on the Ingraham iron front. It has a good E&A Ingraham label and a New Haven movement. A nice and interesting clock.
     
  26. f.webster

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    I have learned from this thread that this is an E. Ingraham GRECIAN mantel clock. My question is: When did they appear in the catalogs and what veriations were available?

    DSCN6277.jpg
     
  27. shutterbug

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    They date to around 1880. Came in 30 hour and 8 day models, wood and mosaic designs. All were striking clocks as far as I know.
     
  28. f.webster

    f.webster Registered User
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    Do they appear in Tran Duy Ly's Ingraham book?
     
  29. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I used another book, Roy Ehrhardt's Official Price Guide To Antique Clocks.
     
  30. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    The Grecian is most certainly in Tran. it is listed as offered between 1865 and 1880, except for the mosaic, which seems to have been offered until about 1883. Yours is a nice looking model, rosewood, I presume.
     
  31. harold bain

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    Tran shows one from an 1869 catalog, and another with a patent date of 1862 on its label. He suggests this model was made from 1865-1880, giving you a 15 year window for your manufacturing date.
     
  32. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #132 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Aug 30, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 29, 2017
    The Gods o' Picking have smiled upon this supplicant this summer. I thought I would post this clock found at my absolutely favorite NH flea market. What stuff I have found there. And to belabor the same tiresome point, << $100. Why futz around with repros, or modern or foreign clocks when one can have a scarce genuinely antique American clock??

    It is the Empire model, very similar to the one that Steve posted some time ago.

    The case is rosewood veneered. Note there is NO "candy striping". I have no doubt it is original and not faded away. Like the Grecians and Venetians, I suppose sometimes they were, sometimes they weren't.

    Note the roundels on the top or as Steve called them the powered wig. The roundels are actually painted to look like burled wood.

    Note the paper on zinc dial which is original.

    There is a rather generic label on the outer surface on the inner backboard.

    Note the burgundy colored flocked paper on the inner backboard.

    The dial matt is decorated with 2 pressed brass medallions bearing Maltese crosses. This is different from Steve's model, but check out Tran's Ingraham book. See page 261, figure 814. It appears to have the same medallions. I have carefully inspected my clock. I am pretty comfortable that they are original.

    It is interesting to note I have seen over the years "variants" of the Empire model. It seems not to have been made in great numbers with a number of variants were made over the years.

    The pendulum on my clock may be replaced as the examples I can find all seem to have a barrel pendulum. I associate the pendulum on my clock with New Haven. However, notice the witness mark on the backboard...so maybe original??

    RM

    IMG_6015.jpg IMG_6014.jpg IMG_6013.jpg IMG_6011.jpg IMG_6010.jpg IMG_6009.jpg IMG_6008.jpg IMG_6007.jpg IMG_6006.jpg
     
  33. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    Nice find RM. I agree that the pend. is New Haven,never seen one on an Ingraham.
     
  34. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Nice find, RM. I tend to think the pendulum is a replacement. Barrel pendulums do se to be what one might expect on these, but I suppose the Ingraham bullseye might also have been used on occasion, and hence the "witness mark," of there is any significance to that. The Venetian label gives me pause. Although the Empire is essentially a modified Venetian, the label is unexpected. Accepting the backboard as original, I have to wonder whether the label might be a later addition.
     
  35. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    #135 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Aug 30, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2014
    Thanks to all for their comments and interest.

    No question about the originality of the back board.

    I also have no question that the label is original and not a later addition.

    I believe that so few of these were made that they did not print a special label?

    Unfortunately , in Tran there is no pic nor mention of the label.

    RM
     
  36. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Thanks for the confirmation on the label. Though this style of label is usually seen on the inside backboard of Ingraham clocks, I have seen them on the outside backboard before but never had the opportunity to see one first hand, and some of the photos seemed to show obviously later labels pasted onto the backboard. Interesting to note that the patent dates on the left of the label were originally patents that concerned the Doric model more appropriately.
     
  37. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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    #137 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Sep 6, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
    I feel that the Pickin' Gods have smiled upon me this summer.

    They seem to favor Ingraham. That's fine with me.

    This one was a relatively recent find in junk shop in one of the coastal towns a short drive away.

    It's the same shop that yielded the Irving and Casson timepiece which was the subject of this thread: https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?104014-Who-the-heck-is-Irving-and-Casson

    It's one of those places that every once in awhile something nice, horological and otherwise, may pop up.

    Unfortunately, the guy who runs the place knows his stuff so the price is not always junk shop, but it's not crazy.

    Such was the instance here.

    It's an Ingraham gilt gallery timepiece. The greatest diameter of the case is about 20 inches.

    The original gold leaf finish is quite intact with some loss on the very front of the glazed bezel door. The "ring" surrounding the dial is done in a burnished rather than a shiny finish like the rest of the case. This is a treatment I have seen in other gilt Ingraham gallery clocks with original surface. It is that little detail often lost when these cases get restored with gold leaf, or worse, attacked with gold radiator paint.

    The flat dial is white painted metal with black Roman numerals and screws on to rails. The site size is about 14 inches. The earlier gallery timepieces by Ingraham usually had convex wooden dials (rarely flat) except for the miniature version which also has a metal dial but it is convex like the wooden ones.

    I like those bold original hands with the counter weighted minute hand.

    The signed 8 day skeletonized brass plate steel spring time only movement mounts to the inner back board with feet. Note the between the plates escapement and how the pendulum mounts from a post above the movement and swings behind it.

    Pretty decent label.

    I have some of the earlier "east-west" movement gallery timepieces and another roughly contemporaneous to this example, a small "mosaic" one. I thought this rounded out that collection a bit.

    Please see these threads started by Oxblood2 for some other very pretty examples. This one fills in size-wise the ones he has already posted:

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?113618-Large-E-Ingraham-Gilt-Gallery

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?85431-XL-Large-E-Ingraham-Gilt-Gallery-Clock

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?64509-E-Ingraham-Gilt-Gallery

    Now to find the gilt corrugated case version at a flea market for no money?

    RM
     

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  38. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #138 Steven Thornberry, Sep 19, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
    I thought this wasn't a bad looking Ingraham but might have walked on by if I hadn't taken the time to walk behind it to see if it had a label. From the label, I presumed at first that this this was a special-make clock and not a regular production model offered in the trade catalogues. Looking through Tran's Ingraham book, however, I found that it is the Ducat, which Tran shows from the 1891 catalogue.

    The clock itself is oak, but it has the features of walnut clocks rather than steam-pressed oak clocks. So, IMO, it is a step above the average steam-pressed oak clock. We have actually seen one before on the message board, in this earlier thread.

    The movement is a standard Ingraham 8-day T/S movement, with the often found 1878/1879 patent dates, thus making it prior to April 1897, when Ingraham began routinely stamping production dates on their movements. This is consistent with the 1891 catalogue date of the clock, which may, of course, be a bit earlier or later. The pendulum is not one that I associate with Ingraham or otherwise recognize as used by another company, but it looks fine and works well.

    The label indicates that it was specially ordered for a specific individual/company. However, I have not been able to find out much about the names on the label, The People's Furnishing Co. (PFCo.) and Richard Miller.

    What little I have found about The PFCo. puts it in business in the decade of the 1890's, though this does not rule out its operating before or after. I located a couple of references to The PFCo. at 202, 204, 206 Gloucester Road, Bristol, England, in 1900. I also found a reference to The PFCo. in the Harrisburg (PA) Telegraph. I found one other mention of the company, in Cheswold, Delaware, which I will discuss below. Whether the Bristol, England, company and the company in Pennsylvania and Delaware are the same, I can't say for certain. In any event, I found no independent mention of The PFCo. at the address listed on the label, 1108 Arch Street, Philadelphia.

    I found two mentions of Richard Miller, both naming him as publisher of a family bible. The earlier mention, on a bible published in 1884, puts him at No. 1212 Market Street, Philadelphia. The second mention provides a date of publication of a family bible in1890; Miller's address is given as 1108 Arch Street. Here is the link. Although there is no mention at that website of The PFCo. at the Arch Street address, among the items found with the bible is "[a] receipt from the Peoples Furnishing Company, dated Nov. 3rd 1891 in Cheswold Del for the purchase of one Bible valued at $12.00 to be paid in payments of $1.00 per month until paid off . . . ."

    Hence an indication of some sort of association between Richard Miller and The PFCo. Perhaps Miller was an employee or agent of the company, for whom this clock was specially ordered as a kind of bonus or performance award. In that case, however, I might expect to see something a bit "flashier" than a paper label stuck on the back of the clock. It may simply be that Miller ordered it for himself. But of course, I haven't established what Miller's association with The PFCO. actually was.

    Wordy little devil aren't I?:excited:

    Ducat.JPG Ducat Label.JPG Ducat Mvmt. 1.JPG Ducat Mvmt. 3.JPG Ducat Pendulum.JPG
     
  39. nicksey

    nicksey Registered User

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    Wordy indeed Steven, but very interesting.

    Just digging around a bit myself I found two very brief mentions in the Altoona Tribune, from Altoona, Pennsylvania. One dated 1894 and the other 1895, they don't specify the address, and they are just the briefest mentions of court proceedings but both mention "Richard Miller, doing business as the People's Furnishing Company." So it looks like he was the owner/proprietor of the PFCo. I suspect the company in Bristol, England was unrelated to the one in Pennsylvania.
     
  40. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Good sleuthing, nicksey. Thanks.:thumb: I will add that to my file. Was Miller the plaintiff or the defendant? Or just a disinterested party?
     
  41. nicksey

    nicksey Registered User

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    He was the defendant in both, I say both, I think it was the likely the same case that was long running. The first article was dated February 16, 1894 and was D. A. Waite vs Richard Miller, doing business as The People's Furnishing company, the second article is dated May 21, 1895 and is A. Waite vs. Richard Miller, doing business as the People's Furnishing company. The only difference being the initial D. Unfortunately no clues about the case itself,
     
  42. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Thanks, again, nicksey. So, if Miller and People's were one and the same, then just possibly he ordered this and other clocks from Ingraham to use as premiums for customers. A second and third with this label would be nice. (If he gave one to this Waite fellow, I bet he took it back!:whistle:)
     
  43. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #143 Steven Thornberry, May 6, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    I have had this clock for some time but have not posted it before. It is the Index, shown in Tran's Ingraham book from the 1884 catalogue. It was "saved" from an antique store, the movement was cleaned, and the missing alarm was replaced. I have left the case as found; it isn't too awful, and I do not go in for much in the way of refinishing. Original dial, original door glass.

    Index.JPG

    The pendulum is the Ingraham bulls-eye pendulum with the December 11, 1877 patent date.
    Index Pendulum.JPG

    There are worn remains of a label on the inside base. Directions, etc. No name to be found on the label.

    Index Label.JPG

    The movement is the standard Ingraham 8-day time and strike movement with the 1878/79 patent dates. The name on the movement ("E. Ingraham Company") indicates it was made 1884 or later. (Sometime in 1884, Ingraham changed its name from "The E. Ingraham & Co" to "The E. Ingraham Co." The word "the" is never used in the signature on Ingraham movements.) That name on the movement and the lack of the often found inscription on the inside base (The E. Ingraham & Co.) lead me to date the clock to sometime after the name change in 1884.

    Index Movement 1.JPG Index Movement 2.JPG

    A calendar version of the Index may be seen in this thread. The movement on that clock is signed "E. Ingraham & Co." I have taken this opportunity to review and correct some tiresome mistakes I made in post # 8 of that thread. I have left the following fudge made in that post: "Since Tran shows the Index from the 1884 catalogue, possibly that is the first year it was offered, but I suspect in any event, that it was first offered after 1880 (but that's a guess)." To update and clarify what I should have known better, the 1880 Ingraham catalogue shows only shelf clocks that were designed and popularized by Elias Ingraham himself, e.g., the Doric, the Venetian, the Grecian, and various "modified" versions of the same. Walnuts (as well as other "non-Elias" styles) were first introduced in 1881. The catalogue for that year shows the Decade, Halcyon, Cadet, Nabob, Shah, and Mogul (which is itself a modified Octagon Doric in style). Thereafter, the number of Elias Ingraham designs that were offered began to decrease.
     
  44. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #144 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jul 25, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2015
    Ingraham made quite a variety of gallery and marine lever wall clocks through the 19th well into the 20th century.

    One model of gallery clocks made by this firm were referred to as "corrugated" gallery clocks. The cases were gilt, chestnut or walnut. Dial sizes ranged from 10-14 inches. The movements were 8 day, time only, pendulum. For examples of these clocks, please see Tran's Ingraham book, pages 133 to 135.

    Some years ago, there was an interesting discovery made. Ingraham apparently made a small marine lever timepiece version with a 6 inch dial. The first and so far only report of this version was an example listed in Lindy Larson's Summer 2007 clock catalog. With his gracious permission, I have posted a scan of the relevant page:

    larson.jpg

    The scarcity of this model was reaffirmed by an entry in a RO Schmitt Fine Arts Auction catalog. See 11/10-11/07, lot 539. That for a Wayne Cline miniature replica. In the description, it is stated: "[name of a collector] recently bought an original like this with a 6" dial: prior to this we had no awareness that Ingraham made them this small".

    Well, a second example has recently recently emerged that I wish to share.

    The case is walnut. It has survived in original finish which I just waxed. I feel that the "beauty of the wood" is quite enhanced by the preserving the original finish. I do feel that it displays in a way that would be consistent with the wishes of "its creator".

    IMG_6515.JPG IMG_6516.JPG

    The label has losses but is reasonable:

    IMG_6519.JPG

    This last pic is meant to give some idea of the overall size:

    IMG_6520.JPG

    It is actually a timepiece with a marine lever movement signed by the maker. I did not take pix of the movement.

    As per my usual practice, I am including a non-horological bit.

    Genuine period American antiques have become very affordable. Recently I acquired this country Chippendale side chair for, well, as we used to say in the Bronx, "bupkis":

    IMG_6535.JPG

    A real period chair. Very nice unmolested condition. Late 18th to early 19th century. Full height to feet. Pierced splat. Note the carved exaggerate crest "ears". Old or original finish. What appears to be original rush seat. New England. I thought it might be MA, S. Shore based upon examples in the book "Harbour and Home" though I'm not sure.

    I remember when these chairs cost a lot more. Will the price recover? I doubt it. The desire for and knowledge about such pieces just doesn't seem to exist anymore. But if you're interested, they are now very accessible. Collect them because you love and appreciate them. No longer as an investment.

    Oh Lord, am I tired of the struggles involved with down loading images to the MB.

    RM
     
  45. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #145 Steven Thornberry, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    In its 1896 catalogue (per Tran), Ingraham offered a set of mantel clocks called "Big Six." These six clocks were the New York, the Boston, the Chicago, the St. Louis, the Washington, and the Atlanta. This set made a reappearance in the 1899/1900 catalogue, in which they are grouped together as "The Cities."

    In addition to the 1896 Big Six set, Tran shows four of the clocks individually, also from the 1896 catalogue. The Atlanta and St. Louis, OTOH, are shown individually from the 1895 catalogue, which, I suppose, leaves open the possibility that the other four were also offered in that year, perhaps the Big Six set as well.

    Of the six, all but the New York were always listed as oak. The New York is listed as walnut in the 1896 catalogue (again, per Tran) and continues to be listed as walnut until the 1901-02 and 1903-04 catalogues. In the 1901-02 catalogue, there is no mention of the wood. In the 1903-04 catalogue, apparently the last in which it appears, it is listed as oak. By the 1901-02 catalogue, only the New York and the Chicago remained of the original six, and the Chicago is shown only as a calendar clock. The Chicago was the only one to have achieved calendar clock status, and it was the longest lasting, continuing until at least 1915/16, about which time it seems to have been discontinued. In any event, it does not appear in the 1918-19 catalogue.

    Below are pictures of an Ingraham New York that I recently acquired. The label is excellent (well, good, at any rate :whistle:), and the case is in good shape. The door glass, which is a replacement, has a transfer that could have been done better. But, it doesn't look too bad. The decorative wood pieces on the crest and the sides are applied with glue, but there are also nails in each piece, which appear as much decorative as functional.

    New York.JPG New York Label.JPG

    The steel-plated movement carries the 1878 and 1879 patent dates but does not have the month-year date code that Ingraham began using routinely in April 1897. That would place the movement as made before April 1897 (unless the date code was for some reason simply left off) and would make it the earliest steel-plated Ingraham movement that I remember seeing.

    New York Mvmt. Front.JPG New York Mvmt. Back.JPG New York Mvmt. Signature.JPG

    Forgot to add, the New York also came in a wall model, shown in Tran from the 1897 catalogue. I could not find it after the 1899/1900 catalogue.
     
  46. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #146 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Sep 12, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2015
    Life, liberty and the pursuit of Ingraham.

    I sort of lump this clock with some of the other commemorative clocks I've posted previously.

    It is a walnut shelf clock. Nice "Liberty" or "Columbia" head on the crest.

    IMG_6607.JPG IMG_6610.JPG

    Nice mellow original surface which I just waxed. I feel the old finish enhances the beauty of the wood and it's appearance 130 years later would be as the creator of the clock wished it to be rather than having it refinished to as it looked when it left the factory.

    Note the original transfer decorated glass. This clock was meant to commemorate the dedication of the Statue of Liberty in 1886, a gift from the people of France to the U.S. Missed the U.S. Centennial by 10 years.

    IMG_6608.JPG

    For more information about the Statue of Liberty, see this site: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/307 . It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. A precious thing as radical morons are currently destroying other World Heritage sites and we commemorate the destructive acts in NYC by other radical morons. Yes, I'm engaging in a "political skree".

    I remember as a child going to the Statue of Liberty on a family trip. Amazing. It is striding towards Manhattan, broken chains at its feet. I remember my father sharing his emotions as he entered NY Harbor and seeing "Liberty" from the troop ship upon his return from Europe at the end of WW II as a returning U.S. GI.

    So much history, and personal history, from a humble genuinely antique American clock.

    Note the glass depicts the Hudson and E. Rivers as they empty in NY Harbor. Sail and steamboats ply the harbor. Also note that another great engineering marvel of the age is depicted. Look carefully and you will see what we now call the Brooklyn Bridge crossing the E. River is depicted. It was opened in 1883.

    There is are the dark remains of a green label in the bottom of the case.

    IMG_6609.JPG

    I can make out "Erie, PA". I believe that this was made for Chas. F. Adams whose father ran the American Wringer Co. See ROSFA Auction, 4/22/07, lot 557. By the way, I'm not sure why they felt the tablet of that clock was replaced. However, they fail to indicate that the finial is.

    I have found other examples of this clock on line:

    http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=29728

    http://www.rubylane.com/item/61838-368275x204852/x22Statue-Libertyx22-Walnut-Cased-E-Ingraham

    I have even found a wall version:

    https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/2933012_e-ingraham-wall-gingerbread-clock-pat-1879

    One thing I found curious about my example. The others on-line seem to have a separate gong for the hours and bell for the alarm. In some examples, the gong base is embossed with the maker's name. As best I can tell, in my clock, the single bell for both alarm and striking the hours is completely original. I've included pix which I feel support this assertion:

    IMG_6619.JPG IMG_6620.JPG

    A clock monger from Ohio recently listed a clock:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ingraham-8-Day-Walnut-LIBERTY-Parlor-Clock-/381382621803?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2047675.l2557&nma=true&si=MhcofZCijH6n%252FjsZL851H3RL5fE%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc

    In fact, he has listed it twice. The Columbia head is missing, the pendulum is wrong, the glass is wrong and the finial is wrong. None of which is mentioned.

    And now time for something completely irrelevant!

    Here are some cut and paste silhouettes I've found over the years:

    IMG_6633.JPG IMG_6636.JPG IMG_6637.JPG

    Note the inscription at the bottom of each "bust". Here's a close-up of a representative one:

    IMG_6634.JPG

    Martha Honeywell was born without arms and malformed feet. However, she was an early 19th century sensation. She toured the U.S. and the Continent cutting silhouettes using her mouth. She produced AMAZING needle work, cut work, etc. Furthermore, there are few known female silhouette artists from the early 19th century, let alone those who were handicapped. She is a true national treasure. For more about her, see this: http://bornwithoutarms.blogspot.com/

    RM

    IMG_6607.JPG IMG_6608.JPG IMG_6610.JPG IMG_6609.JPG IMG_6619.JPG IMG_6620.JPG IMG_6633.JPG IMG_6636.JPG IMG_6637.JPG IMG_6634.JPG
     
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  47. mountaintimer

    mountaintimer Registered User

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    #147 mountaintimer, Nov 15, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2015
    Clock watching is one thing that makes traveling to other parts of the country more fun.
    A few weeks ago, prior to heading to northern Idaho, for our granddaughter's wedding I checked that area's Craigslist for antique clocks.
    I saw only one clock that looked interesting. In fact, Sue & I have been keeping our eyes open for one like it. However, the seller of this one was asking far more in the month old ad than we were prepared to spend on a vacation clock.
    yesterday I took another look at what was available and there was the Ingraham Doric ad updated 5 hours earlier with a drastically reduced price.
    Front View.jpg
    We called, then immediately traveled north a few miles to take a look at it.
    The clockmaker, seller, said that he had completely renewed the movement a couple of years ago, but no longer had room for several of his clocks, so this one had to go.

    Right side door open.jpg
    He also said that it was all original. We bought it because it looked nice and if truly all original would make a fine permanent addition to our collection.
    Pendulum and inner label.jpg
    The label on the back of the case looks really fresh and new looking, the picture of the flag on the lower window looks new also.
    Hopefully one of you will be able to enlighten me on this and what year it may have been produced.
    Initialed inner door.jpg
    These initials and the 700 written here also have me wondering.
    Maybe some of this info will help; this model cannot be turned backwards without locking up, there is no date stamped on the bezel, and it has pinned hands.
    Calhoun printing Works Hartford.jpg

    Ron
     
  48. mountaintimer

    mountaintimer Registered User

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    #148 mountaintimer, Nov 15, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2015
    Here is a pic of the front of the movement with the dial removed:
    IMG_2661.jpg
    I am sorry it is a bit blurry, but it does show that there is no date stamped on the front of the movement, and that the movement is pinned like the hands. hopefully this may also help set a date for its manufacture.
    Ron
     
  49. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    The company name "E. Ingraham & Co." would put in between January 1860 and July 1880, when that name was used.

    The latest patent date on the label, June 6, 1871, shows it was made after that date.

    Since the movement does not carry the Oct. 8, 1878 and Nov. 11, 1879, patent dates, we can suppose this clock was manufactured between June 6, 1871, and October 8, 1878, always assuming, of course, that Ingraham was not just playing with us.
     
  50. mountaintimer

    mountaintimer Registered User

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    #150 mountaintimer, Nov 15, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2015
    Thank you Steven for helping pin down an approximate date of manufacture.
    The unmarked movement is what threw me.
    Both of our other Ingrahams have date and patent date stamped on the movements which leave no doubt about when they were made.
    I looked for a picture of the flag (like ours) on a lot of Doric pictures on the web, but never did find a match. I wondered if it had any significance to either President Grant or President Hayes from that era.
    Do any of you have an idea of its significance, if there is any?
    Ron
     

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