Ingraham Clocks

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Steven Thornberry, Nov 5, 2009.

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  1. iowaclock

    iowaclock Registered User

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    After reading this thread Richard T., I may have a clue to your unidentified walnut parlor or just another fork in the road. I had seen that clock or something very similar at the tom harris auction on the 1st. I found a picture online of that clock and it isnt the same, but very similar. It has works made by Ingraham but was identified as a Charles F. Adams Walnut 8 day Parlor Clock.

    They may have a connection

    http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/7347425
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    It's nice to see a special make with a label. Apparently named the Sovereign, if I read it right. A somewhat different clock from Richard's, as you say, but with similar case style.
     
  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thought I would post an Ingraham Marine.

    I believe it to be either the "Corrugated Lever, Mosaic" or the "Round Lever, Mosaic". In Tran's book, the illustrations reproduced, page 137, figure 354 and page 138, figure 357, respectively, look identical to me.

    The wood case is of laminated construction of alternating light (maple?) and dark (walnut?) wood. A hallmark of Ingraham was the wonderful use of contrasting woods to construct some of his cases. The clock has a spun brass glazed bezel over a paper applied to zinc pan 6 inch dial. Note the seconds bit. The case houses a spring driven brass 30 hour balance wheel movement.

    Applied to the back board is a full orange paper printed label.

    Joyce Wahler, whom I've dubbed "Ms Ingraham", has published a great article in the Bulletin about Ingraham marines with pictures of the various models, labels, and movements (sorry, too lazy to pull the dial). The link is:

    http://nawcc.org/images/stories/1990/articles/1996/303/303_528.pdf

    Remember, for this link to work, you must be an NAWCC member and logged on to this website.

    This was found a little while ago very reasonably priced in good all original unmolested condition in a modest NH group shop. I continue to maintain that there are still good antique American clocks out there for the pickin'.

    RM
     

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  4. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Nice find RM. The wood looks great with the contrasting pieces. Did you have to do much to shine it up?
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your kind comment.

    All I did was polish it with a good quality clear furniture paste wax. For better or worse, this is generally the usual "ritual" to which each new acquisition is subjected. Alternatively, depending upon the nature of the surface, I may choose to do nothing more then dust it off with a soft cloth. I apply the wax sparingly, permit it to dry which leaves the surface hazy, then gently and patiently rubbed off with soft cloths, repeatedly changing to a fresh one, until they show little residual residue. Don't know if this is for the purist, but I've found that this treatment leaves the original surface otherwise undisturbed and I feel it produces a very satisfactory result. I did polish the spun brass bezel. I realize some may object to that, too.

    I don't like Briwax, by the way.

    RM
     
  6. blueloon

    blueloon Registered User

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    Beautiful clocks all!!! I am so jealous. Here is my one and only Ingraham. (The wooden box under it in the picture obviously doesn't belong to it. Just a way to keep it out of the way of my dog's tail.)
     

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  7. owen.or

    owen.or Registered User
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    I purchased this clock a couple of days ago. It is a Brewster & Ingrahams miniature 30 hr. spring driven ogee c. 1850-53. The time/strike movement AND the alarm movement all have brass springs. (gold color of springs is washed out in photo) Appears entirely original excepting for the tip of the minute hand. Nice signed ribbed plate movement. Good papers and signed dial. Beautiful lower glass. David "owen.or"
     

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  8. tomrsey

    tomrsey Registered User

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    It is great looking at all the Ingrahams. Wonderful examples. Two of my favorites are the column arch with its Civil War themed glass, and an Ionic with a turquoise color that I haven't seen very often.
     

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  9. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #59 Steven Thornberry, May 20, 2010
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
    Very nice, Tom. I've been wanting an Ingraham arch column for a long time, but never found one good enough for the money asked, and I'm a bit leary of buying one of these off eBay.
     
  10. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Congrats to both Tomrsey and Owen.or for their lovely clocks.

    Always been a fan of the B+I miniature ogees. Owned a few over the years. I usually fall in love with the lovely Fenn glasses of which Owen.or's is a wonderful prime example!

    Have also been a fan of the Arch Top model. There are a number of case variations. Having an examples of some of them could be an interesting little collection within a collection.

    Re: the arch top, check out Joyce Wahler's article:

    http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/.../378/378_4.pdf

    Also look at the back cover of that particular Bulletin for color photos of examples of various arch top models.

    RM
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Sort of thought would pick up some of the discussion re: Ingraham, Pomeroy movements, labels, etc that started on this thread:

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=62743

    Posted below are two "small Venetians" (clocks, not diminutive people from a city in Italy). In Tran's Ingraham book, page 265, figure 831, they would be classified as "miniature" at just under 13 inches tall. I really like these miniatures.

    The clock on the viewer's left has a brass spring driven time and strike 30 hour movement marked N. Pomeroy/Bristol, CT. The stamp on the movement doesn't show up great in the photo. Note the green E. Ingraham & Co. label with the latest patent date mentioned of 1861.

    The clock on the viewer's right has a brass spring driven time and strike 30 hour movement clearly marked E. Ingraham & Co. It too has a green E. Ingraham and Co. label with the latest patent date mentioned of 1861.

    The labels are not identical with subtle differences in size of type face and other elements and claims.

    Note the subtle differences in the cases. The clock on the viewer's left has side mouldings on either side of the front of clock to which the turned gilt (now largely worn and radiator painted) 1/2 columns are applied. It also retains it's original finish and graining on the front. The turned gilt (ditto comments) 1/2 columns are applied directly to the front of the case of the clock on the viewer's right. Unfortunately, a previous owner refinished the graining off, a common fate. Note the columns are heavier and turned somewhat differently in one clock versus the other and the different type of door hinges used.

    The clock on the viewer's right is most similar to the one posted by Dave B earlier in this thread. It has the Pomeroy movement and is marked the same way as in my clock. The patriotic lower door tablet of a fierce eagle clutching a "star and bar" shield in the clock on the viewer's left probably once looked like the one in his. Unfortunately, my glass is flaking and looses another chunk if I look at it cross eyed.

    RM
     

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  12. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Bob: Thanks for the pictures. I will post some add'l of my "Pomeroy-Ingraham" Venetian" later today, time permitting. As a point of clarification, in the second and third pictures, it appears that the Pomeroy movement and label are on the left. Is that correct, or is it my eyes playing tricks on me again?
     
  13. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    That's correct. In all photos, except the last one, all aspects of the miniature Venetian with the Pomeroy movement are on the viewers left. The last pic is of the Pomeroy movement in that clock.

    RM
     
  14. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #64 Steven Thornberry, May 23, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    Here's mine, a 15 1/2" Venetian with a 30-hour Pomeroy movement. The green label has "E. Ingraham & Co. and a latest patent date of Sept. 2, 1861. I figure, therefore, that the clock was manufactured between late 1861 and appx. 1865, possibly a bit later, depending on when Ingraham used up its stock of Pomeroy movements. The clock currently has a bell strike and an alarm (both bells removed for picture of label). The bell strike, however, is incorrect, since there is behind it the clear impression of a wire gong. I might at sometime look for an appropriate wire gong, when the mood strikes me.:D It probably had a reverse door design, but that is long gone. Instead, it seems that a previous owner may have put a fancy pendulum in its place; I'm not sure it's original, but it works well and looks fine. The coulmns are applied directly to the case front. The 30-hour Pomeroy movement is signed.


    I might as well add that the label gives the printer as Calhoun Printing Co. 66 State St., Hartford.

    Venetian 1.jpg Venetian Label.JPG Venetian Movement.JPG
     
  15. coop301

    coop301 Registered User

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    Seth Thomas mantal. Cabinet is Walnut. I believe it to be one of the City or College series but can't find an exact match in any of the books. The tablet has a tree on it. The pendulum has what appears to be a church or other structure with an arched entrance and steeple. The trademark on the face is a circle with an S and thru the top of the S there is an E and the bottom loop, a T which I hope will give me a date range. ANY help would be appreciated.
     

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  16. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Re: Identity help please...

    From what I can see, the clock seems to be an Ingraham. The door glass is found in some Ingraham models. The pendulum looks like an Ingraham, as well, but the picture does not enlarge. I didn't, however, see an exact match in Tran's Ingraham book, though I might have missed it. The logo you describe sounds like E&J Swigart's. They made replacement parts for clocks and watches, and their logo is prominent on their replacement paper dials.

    What about the movement? No label, I presume?
     
  17. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  18. coop301

    coop301 Registered User

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    Re: Identity help please...

    Thanks Steve. I know now how I miss it on www.antiqueclockspriceguide.com. I was looking for a Seth Thomas. Hmmm. Ingraham. I will have to look at the movement. I just received the clock this past Saturday and have not had a whole lot of time to really dive into it. That is the exact tablet though. Mine is a bit worn off in the middle. Wish I could get a replacement. At least I know there are at least 2 of this model clock in the world. I will post some better pics and of the movement when I have a chance. Thanks again.

    If possible, maybe merge this with the Ingraham Clock thread?
     
  19. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #69 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 16, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2010
    I'm going to introduce this posting by swiping the title of one of my references and start off by saying "When the Huron is not an Ingraham".

    The Huron is one of the less commonly found Ingraham models, having been manufactured briefly between 1878-80. See Tran's Ingraham book, page 261, figure 816 and page 271, figure 861 for pictures of this model. I personally find them attractive. Much to my disappointment, have never been able to get my grubby mitts on a good example.

    The clock posted below looks for all the world like a Huron. Rosewood and rosewood veneer on a pine. The mouldings are ebonized (bit hard to see here) and the turned wooden bezel is in fact faux grained. Retains what appears to be a nice original finish.

    Dial is paper on a metal with a brass surround. Not the dial typically found on this model, however.

    Note the three "jar" faux mercury pendulum with ornate gilt washed frame. The "jars" are actually hollow glass tubes that are coated with mercury, more like a mirror or the mercury glass that was popular in the 19th century. Not typical Ingraham, either.

    Clock never had a label. Most of the backboard is painted a matte black.

    Now, check out that movement! Definately American, original, and not Ingraham. 8 day, brass, steel spring driven time and strike. It is unsigned. Note the rack and snack, bell mounted to the top of the movement, pendulum suspension mounts behind, and the winding rachets and pawls.

    The cases and movements were designed by Gilbert H. Blakesley. By 1876, he reached an agreement with George A. Jones of Bristol, Ct. to manufacture and sell clocks of his design. Ingraham later purchased or somehow obtained the rights to the case design, marketing it under the name Huron. Since Ingraham began manufacturing the Huron by 1878, few were probably made by Jones.

    The Jones firm was not in business for very long. George A Jones passed away in 1881, 11 years after building his fine brick factory in Bristol. It is interesting to note that Ingraham rented the 2 top floors of the old Jones factory from 1885-90.

    For more information about these often misunderstood and miscataloged clocks, see:

    http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/1970/articles/1979/199/199_150.pdf

    In particular, see figures 1, 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9. This article has a wealth of information about Blakesley's patents.

    The particular patent features present in this clock are the case, door sash, ratchets and pawls, and strike mechanism. I'm not sure if it incorporates his patent for a "clock socket"

    Also see:

    http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/1980/articles/1986/245/245_464.pdf

    This article has a wealth of information about George A. Jones, his company, Gilbert A. Blakesley, his patents, his involvement with Jones, and more examples of variations on this movement. It's a good read.

    Finally, see:

    http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/1990/articles/1991/274/274_542.pdf

    Specifically pages 547-8, figures 7A-B.

    REMEMBER, TO ACCESS THESE REFERENCES YOU MUST BE LOGGED ON AND A NAWCC MEMBER.

    So, next time you see a Huron, look closely. It may be something even rarer.

    RM
     

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  20. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Very nice (non) Ingraham, Bob. Thanks for posting. I, too, would like to have a Huron, but they are few and far between, and my wallet only stretches so far, alas.:(
     
  21. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks!

    RM
     
  22. Dave B

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    #72 Dave B, Jun 17, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010
    Here are the gong and base from that little Noah Pomeroy movement I posted earlier in this thread. I find it interesting that the gong, when compared to the other Pomeroy movements, seems a little skimpy. Also, the cast iron gong base looks like Ingraham to me, but of course, there's no logo on it.
     

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  23. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    That gong wire doesn't look right, that's for sure. It looks like it was uncoiled and then recoiled not too well. The gong base may be correct. What I seem to recall with many Noah Pomeroy movements is a gong base with a brass cover, like the one is RM's pictures above. It is not hard to lose the cover, however.
     
  24. Dave B

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    The only thing is, there don't seem to be any places where the rust is thinner on it, or, except for the end, any obvious kinks. Also, It is flat in the plane. All those things lead me to suspect it is original, though perhaps not original to that particular clock.
     
  25. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #75 Steven Thornberry, Jul 27, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
    A plain Ingraham walnut, the Halcyon (ca. 1881), which I might not have bought were it not for the $25.00 price tag. I didn't have the heart to bargain the seller down to $20.00. All in all, a nice "meat-and-potatoes" clock of the era. The case was in great shape, including the original glass. The movement was also good. The best thing, however, was the bushing on the EW bridge. Yes, that is actually a bushing, not a repair to the original bridge. A nice twist on screwed in bushing.:rolleyes: Saves on solder, too.:D The movement has been working well, nonetheless; so, it stays until next servicing.

    Halcyon.JPG Halcyon Movement 1.JPG Halcyon Inscription.JPG
     
  26. Jeremy Woodoff

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    #76 Jeremy Woodoff, Jul 31, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2010
    Here is another Ingraham "Oriental" model, this one with gilt trim but without the inlaid base. It has a separate door on the front for access to the pendulum. Some models, perhaps the later ones, do not have this.
     

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  27. inbeat

    inbeat Registered User
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    #77 inbeat, Jul 31, 2010
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    Great clock Jeremy. The "Oriental" is hard to find and is so different looking that it just hits the right spot.
    -> posts merged by system <-
    Isn't it amazing? A nice looking walnut parlor clock for $25. Shows what the market is getting to right now...I would have popped it also at that price. Good buy.
     
  28. laumeg

    laumeg Registered User

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    Hi, Looked thru the listings and did not see a Ingram Pansy, so I thought I would add mine. I have not had it long, but it runs and looks good. From my understanding the Pansy always had a bubble level at the bottom and a thermomiter at the top, and an alarm. Mine is missing the thrmomiter but have ordered one from Timesavers. Hope this adds to the story. Charles
     

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  29. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    I've always been a fan of tambour mantle clocks. Here's my model 1643. This was my second Ingraham clock and my favorite.
     

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  30. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

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    My only Ingraham,year and model unknown.Great case and and a newer dial .
    Bruce
     

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  31. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I really like Ingraham clocks. Wish I had a few more!

    I especially like the "candy stripe" clocks, off which some nice examples are posted earlier on this Ingraham thread.

    Just to get in the act as well as to consolidate and cross-link information on the MB, I'm including a link to an Ingraham "candy stripe" I posted some time ago on another thread.

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=60864

    By the by...do Brewster and Ingraham clocks qualify for inclusion on this thread or is it strictly Ingraham products??

    RM
     
  32. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    My Ingrahams. The Western Union store regulator was my very first clock bought in about 1984. The Pacific is a very nice clock. Would like to have the Arctic, Indus and Bartholdi to round out the group. The Kitchenette is nice. The Landau was purchased as a project clock. I decided that since it was not a "museum" quality piece that I would just personalize it for me. :D All of these clocks are good time keepers by the way.
     

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  33. Jay

    Jay Registered User

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    One of my Ingraham clocks
    Dew Drop Calendar clock--1920"s ?

    Not the best photo--
    Jay
     

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  34. BDMarshall

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  35. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #85 Steven Thornberry, Jul 6, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
    Becky, that clock is the Calais, a cabinet clock that Ingraham produced in the 1930's. A very nice model, in my opinion, since I happen to own one. My experience has been that it is a good runner. Ingraham used a similar case style in electric clocks. FWIW, some radio companies contracted with Ingraham, I believe, to make their cabinets. Old Elias Ingraham started out as a clock case maker and was known for developing many case styles popular in the 1800's.

    This is it, right?
     
  36. tomrsey

    tomrsey Registered User

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    Here is a nice Brewster and Ingraham. It has a convex glass, and an "upside down" or "east west" movement. Note the winding arbor is above the center post. The pendulum hangs from the top of the case.
     

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  37. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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  38. inbeat

    inbeat Registered User
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    I have never owned one of these but have always admired them from afar....great clock....envy here....
     
  39. f.webster

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    Mine is not the most beautiful E. Ingraham; but, I haven't seen another like it.

    Actually it just the case with a label. I have just begun to search for the missing pieces. From the holes in the back it appears that the works mounted to the rear and there may have been a baker's alarm..or gong mounted below.

    The label reads: KEUKA, The E, Ingraham Co., Direction - Wind..., To Set Alarm - Place the hour (on the small or alarm dial)...

    Did the face mount to the works or on the case? What did it look like?

    I believe the glass is original.

    As always, I am thankful for the wise council.
     

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  40. inbeat

    inbeat Registered User
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    Webster...yours is commonly called a "kitchen clock" or "gingerbread"...these were very common with many versions made. The dials are mounted to the wood behind the door after the door is open...the movement should not be too hard to find and as you guessed, is mounted to the rear of the case.
     
  41. f.webster

    f.webster Registered User
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    Thanks Inbeat,

    I knew that it was a kitchen/gingerbread clock; however, I haven't seen a KEUKA before. It is a project!!

    Anyone have a Ingraham catalog that can identify this model and date it for me?
     
  42. Jeremy Woodoff

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    The "Keuka" was one of Ingraham's "Lake Line" series, that also included "Oneida," "Seneca," "Itasca," "Micha," and "Cayuga." They are all very similar, differing only in details of the pressed designs. They appeared in Ingraham's 1915 catalog. The catalog pictures for all these models show Roman numeral dials, but the listing says they were available with Roman or Arabic dials. The clocks listed for $3.80 each, and for 45 cents more you could get an alarm or a gong (I think that means a cathedral gong rather than the usual thin wire gongs).

    The glass in your clock matches the one pictured in the catalog.
     
  43. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #93 Steven Thornberry, Aug 1, 2011
    Last edited: May 19, 2020
    I had thought this one was posted in this thread before. It is the Phenix, one I grabbed when offered for a reasonable price. Tran shows it from the 1881 catalogue. It is in excellent shape, including the nice door glass, which I have not seen up close and personal before (unless ther's another in this thread:eek:), though it does appear on a couple of clocks in Tran's Ingraham book.

    Gilbert used the same basic case for its Argus, which also appears among clocks manufactured by George B. Owen & Co. (1875-79). The New Haven Rhine is also similar. Shown here and in Tran with a rounded top door, I have also seen one with an octagon-top door (at least it was said to be the Phenix).

    Phenix 1.JPG Phenix Movement 2.JPG Phenix Movement.JPG Phenix pendulum.JPG
     
  44. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thought it time to revive this tread devoted to Ingraham and the products of his various companies (I'm sure no one would object to the continued posting of clocks which are products of Elias' earlier firms).

    Brewster and Ingraham made gallery time pieces. They had 8 day "east-west" movements. The movement back plates could be cast iron or brass. The springs were usually brass. The pendulum was mounted above the movement, the rod passing behind it, with the bob swinging below. The escapement was between the plates.

    The cases were made of wood, often gilded. If not gilded, it was of a hard wood. I have also seen cast iron cases.

    The dials typically were of wood and convex.

    Various examples of these gallery timepieces have been posted on the MB, both on this thread and elsewhere (I posted some on the dial clocks thread in the remote past).

    These time pieces came in various sizes, most often found with an about 11 inch dial. Less often found are the the large size and the miniature.

    The first clock is the big one. The convex wooden dial is about 16 1/2 inches in diameter, the clock overall about 22 inches. The picture shows it in relation to some standard sized shelf clocks. The dial is untouched. I could not find any evidence that it was once signed. This example has it's original convex glass, an amazing survivor. Original matt and burnished gilt surface with a few retouches. The other picture shows the side. Note the contrasting black band which is absolutely original. Rather slender profile, too.

    The next picture shows 2 of the 11 inch dial models, one gilded the other in I think walnut. They're the 2 larger ones in the group photo...sorry, kinda badly chosen picture. The walnut model has a flat wooden dial signed by Pond and Barnes of Boston. Also of note is that it bears the label of Terry and Andrews. For more infomation, see the recent Bulletin research column.

    Finally, there is the miniature with the 7 1/2 convex metal dial. Once, again, the dial is untouched and I cannot find evidence that it ever had a signature. The dial is also unusual in that rather than pinning to rails as do the dials in the other clocks, it screws to 3 wooden pillars attached to the backboard. Also, these movements had steel springs with a retaining pin in the winding arbour.

    For purposes of the posting, I had planned to hang all of these together on one wall to show the relative sizes, but honestly, would have had to move too much stuff around.

    Sorry, wasn't taking any of these apart to show the labels and movements. Look in the books. They're published there

    For more information, search the MB. There are releavant postings. Also, see Tran's Ingraham book. Finally, see Handbook of Clocks Produced by Charles Kirk, Elisha C. Brewster and Brewster and Ingrahams, etc, etc (the title is almost as long as the book) by Ultsch and Cowan.

    RM
     

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  45. sherlockclock

    sherlockclock Registered User

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    I recently purchased my first Ingraham: a black mantle that, according to the front of the movement, was made in July, 1926. I cleaned up the case, dial, ornaments, and had good luck repainting the incise. I am wondering what this particular style was called (I know black mantles were a dime a dozen, but they still have a history). I suspect that the legs and lions might have been a later add, and that the hands aren't original. Any information would be much appreciated. Thanks.
     

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  46. Richard T.

    Richard T. Deceased
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    I did not find your clock in LY's Ingraham book but that is not unusual. I agree that the hands are not a match and probably are not original. The feet and lions heads are, in my view, original.

    Good job, enjoy your clock.

    Best,

    Richard T.
     
  47. Dch48

    Dch48 Registered User

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    My only Ingraham was my first eBay buy of an antique timepiece. It was listed as not having been run or cleaned for several years but I really liked how it looked and figured it would be a nice decorative piece even if it didn't work. The price was right so I got it. It arrived without a key or pendulum and the side decorations as well as 2/3 of the pillar mountings were detached with the brass nails lying loose in the packaging. I fitted everything back together and then proceeded to oil the movement as best I could without taking it out of the case. It still hasn't been out so I don't know what it says on the front. I had no idea what make it was but while searching for a pendulum was told by a seller that it looked like a Gilbert and he sold me a Gilbert pendulum. I then deduced from extensive Googling that it was in fact an Ingraham since it has a wheel time adjustment protruding from the dial and Ingrahams were the only ones I saw that had that. The wheel seems to be stuck though and I can't turn it in either direction. I started out by borrowing the adjustable pendulum from our William S. Johnson Ogee and it worked very well. The clock now has an adjustable pendulum from another old ogee that was parted out on eBay and will run a full 8 days on a winding within what I understand are as good as can be expected time differences that can be achieved by this type of clock. It gradually gets to be about a minute fast after 3 days, then runs right on for the 4th day and starts slowing down after that. After 7 days, it's about a minute slow or maybe a little more.

    My research has told me that it is an Ingraham Adrian model that could have been made anywhere between 1899 and 1926. I have touched it up a little and it looks even better than in this picture.

    Mantel-1.jpg
     
  48. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Actually, it might well be the Anchor, which Ingraham made between 1901 and 1908 as a black mantel, and between 1902-04 as a mahogany case. The anchor was 11 inches high and 17 1/2 inches wide at the base. The dimensions are the same as the Adrian, but the side handles are different. The ones on yours seem more like the Anchor's. See Tran's Ingraham book, p. 233, figs. 713 and 714. Take of the dial and see what dates are on the movement to get a ballpark for the actual clock. Of course, that will not decide definitively in favor of the Anchor or the Adrian.
     
  49. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User

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    Here's a 1911 Adrian. The case is the same but the dial pan is different and where yours has carvings in the case mine has dimples filled with gold paint. It's currently being repaired from mainspring explosion.
    Clocks 114.jpg
     
  50. Dch48

    Dch48 Registered User

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    #100 Dch48, Mar 8, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2012
    I saw one being sold on an auction site that looked exactly the same as mine and was listed as an Adrian from 1905. Of course they may have been wrong but it had the same dial and fittings. It was actually an exact duplicate. Mine was listed on eBay as a "Victorian Eastlake Mantel Clock", whatever that means. The seller was a picker who bought it from an old couple and he obviously had no idea who it was made by. Here's a better picture I just took. It also has a round door on the back and a cutout on the bottom under where the pendulum swings that lets me start and stop it easily.

    Ingraham.jpg
     

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