Ingraham Cannon Pinion

shutterbug

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Well, in theory that works. But to get a real accurate view of what's happening it's best to see apples and apples. ;)
 

Keith Doster

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Just finished navigating this entire thread because I had this cracked pinion on an Ingraham movement. I had this situation once before and pinned it, but thought I'd take what has turned out to be the simpler route of soldering it back in place. However . . . I pass this along so none of you make the same (stupid) mistake I just made. IMG_0993.JPG

IMG_0994.JPG

To make it clear, . . . sigh . . . the minute gear is on upside down. :rolleyes:
 

shutterbug

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Lessons are never cheap :D
 
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Times

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Well, all.... the deed is done...

View attachment 651651 View attachment 651650

In hindsight, I could have used just a TAD more solder.. you can see that the very bottom of the crack isn't quite filled, but that vast majority is. The pinion gear is firmly affixed to the arbor, NO solder buildup anywhere to get in the way of smooth rotation of the minute gear, the cannon butts up against the soldered pinion smoothly with no gap and leaves the perfect amount of clearance for the minute hand (not shown), and I was able to relocate the brass collar that governs the tension on the spring with no problem. I placed the chip of solder on the side of the gear that is currently hidden by the minute gear, and there's good flow all around that arbor there, despite not much flow through to the visible side of that gear/arbor mating surface.

I can't thank you enough! Here's hoping that this is all that was wrong! Now... to get this puppy back together.
Were you referring to this brass collar? If yes, did you simply squeezed it with the pliers and rotated & slid towards the end to release tension on the spring during pivot repair stage? I have just discovered that my Ingraham 10 leaf pinion gave up. "Thanks goodness" it cracked right in the middle of the leaf.. Still, it sits so tight on the shaft. This is one "real good" friction fit application. The ID of this pinion was much smaller than it should have been. I will make an attempt to remove and repair following the instructions provided in this thread.

Brass collar - Copy.PNG Crack in Pinion - Copy.JPG E. Ingraham Co. Bristol, CT - Copy.JPG
 

kinsler33

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Here’s one I just finished yesterday where the brass collar and the cannon pinion were both cracked. I made a new collar and pressed it in place. Then used liquid silver bearing solder to fill the crack on the pinion and soldered it to the arbor while clamping the crack tight with small vice grips. There is still a tiny crack but the space is so small the teeth still mesh. The tension is perfect to be able to set the minute hand.

View attachment 652189 View attachment 652190 View attachment 652191
I suppose nobody is in the mood to hear two easier ways to deal with a cracked Ingraham cannon pinion: (1) get a new one from Timesavers or (2) while holding all the center-shaft parts in place and the clutch spring under compression, apply a drop of red Loc-Tite to the gear such that it's glued to the shaft. It's perfectly reversible if you mess up, for LocTite turns into mush when heated to maybe 300 degrees. But the clocks I've repaired this way are all going strong.

M Kinsler
 

Times

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I suppose nobody is in the mood to hear two easier ways to deal with a cracked Ingraham cannon pinion: (1) get a new one from Timesavers or (2) while holding all the center-shaft parts in place and the clutch spring under compression, apply a drop of red Loc-Tite to the gear such that it's glued to the shaft. It's perfectly reversible if you mess up, for LocTite turns into mush when heated to maybe 300 degrees. But the clocks I've repaired this way are all going strong.

M Kinsler
(1) Could you please provide the link for a new 10-leaf Pinion for Ingraham movements? I could not locate one on the Timesavers website.
(2) Red Loc-Tite may work well to keep the pinion on the shaft, but it will not be useful for repairing the Pinion itself.
 

Times

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Well, it's done. I could have tried Red Loctite, but decided to be on the cautious side.
I like the loctite approach as it's so much easier to fix pinion separately from the assembly while it is not mounted on the shaft.
This clock was purchased as-is / untested on-line. It turned out to be a "learning opportunity" clock as in addition to cracked pinion I had to deal with bent escapement wheel teeth. The clock has been reassembled and now "fun" begins with halfdead beat escapement adjustments.
IMG_8996 - Copy.JPG
 

Times

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After two weeks of running this clock, it's safe to say that it was a success story. One has to be patient while repairing such cracked pinion, but it's very rewarding as clock is working very accurately and produces very pleasant chime (two chime rods). Thanks to everyone for help / guidance.
 

Vernon

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After two weeks of running this clock, it's safe to say that it was a success story. One has to be patient while repairing such cracked pinion, but it's very rewarding as clock is working very accurately and produces very pleasant chime (two chime rods). Thanks to everyone for help / guidance.
Hi Times,

Great job. You can't even see the repair! So what was your approach in repairing this pinion?

Thanks, Vernon
 

Times

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Hi Times,

Great job. You can't even see the repair! So what was your approach in repairing this pinion?

Thanks, Vernon
Thank you! You are being very kind, but yes, it's almost impossible to notice where the crack was before.
All work was done after reading this 2-page thread. It's very useful. Tomorrow I will search for some photos to show the steps.
 

Times

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I am not going to talk about what did NOT work for me. I wasted lots of time "experimenting" and trying to take photos & videos. At some point I said to myself "enough is enough" and simply followed these few steps to complete the job within an hour or two.

1. Remove the cracked pinion from the shaft.
2. Using regular pliers and a hammer move that stubborn brass collar on the shaft in direction away from the spring. Move it far enough so you do not have to compress the spring at all. I placed the shaft vertically resting on a hard surface, placed the "cutter circle area" of the pliers on top of the collar and knocked it down by hammering on the pliers jaws and rotating the shaft occasionally. It takes time, it's not that easy, but eventually the collar goes down still maintaining friction fit (it never gets loose).
3. Now you have two options: 1. File away some metal on the shaft, or 2. File away some metal inside the broken pinion. I went with option #2. Either way, this must be done in order to be able to close the crack before soldering. I did not use a jewelers saw through the crack in the gear as in my case, the crack was in the middle-ish of the leaf and I was afraid to disconfigure it.
4. Clean the broken pinion in lighter fuel :), dry and apply flux into the crack (i used a tiny needle just to apply a small drop).
5. Place the pinion back on the shaft where it should be (it will be a slightly loose fit if you removed just enough metal in Step 3.) Use something similar to what is shown below to close the crack and keep the pinion secure on the shaft. I used a piece of brass and a pair of locking pliers. Do your final visual inspection to make sure the pinion positioning is correct.
6. Secure the locking pliers in anvil.
7. Fire up your gas torch and follow Willie X's soldering instructions (small pieces of solder, no direct heat, etc).
8. Clean all the mess around the soldered area, and use 1200 grit paper to smooth any imperfections to make sure the shape of repaired leaf is identical to others, and no solder stuck between adjacent leaves.
9. Repeat Step 2, but this time moving the brass collar in opposite direction. I placed some light reference points (scratched the shaft) :) before step 2.
That's all to it.

IMG_8824 - Copy.JPG Moving brass collar - Copy.PNG
 

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