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Ingersoll-Trenton pocket watch main spring change.

nico22

Registered User
Jun 10, 2021
26
63
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Hi there!

i intend to replace the mainspring of my IT movement.I watched tutorials on youtube on elgin movements but I can't figure out how I can unscrew or remove this. From the tutorials I watched, this is screwed. Or do I really need to unscrew this aside from the plate screws.

Will appreciate any help and answers.

nico
3EB79CC2-0D09-42BE-9716-8A46930E6046.png
 

karlmansson

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
2,877
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Linköping, Sweden
Country
Specially made tool with two pins or use stout tweezers in a soft material (brass or bronze) and turn the nut with the tips, one in each hole. It will need to be soft tweezers though or you will positively mess up your plates and barrel.

Can’t tell you if it’s right or left hand though.
 

Skutt50

Registered User
Mar 14, 2008
3,995
305
83
Gothenburg
Country
You need to take the movement out of the casing. Then remove the round screw as discussed by Karl. Usually these are right hand......
You can now remove the plate screws and lift the bridge. Sometimes one or two screws are shorter than the other. Take note and replace in the same hole. When the bridge is removed you should be able to remove the mainspring barrel. Unfortunately the setting mechanism often comes loose as well and to get it right you might need to remove the dial.......
 

nico22

Registered User
Jun 10, 2021
26
63
13
32
Country
Specially made tool with two pins or use stout tweezers in a soft material (brass or bronze) and turn the nut with the tips, one in each hole. It will need to be soft tweezers though or you will positively mess up your plates and barrel.

Can’t tell you if it’s right or left hand though.
You need to take the movement out of the casing. Then remove the round screw as discussed by Karl. Usually these are right hand......
You can now remove the plate screws and lift the bridge. Sometimes one or two screws are shorter than the other. Take note and replace in the same hole. When the bridge is removed you should be able to remove the mainspring barrel. Unfortunately the setting mechanism often comes loose as well and to get it right you might need to remove the dial.......

Than you very much for answering my query
-Nico
 

nico22

Registered User
Jun 10, 2021
26
63
13
32
Country
Than you very much for answering my query
-Nico
a
You need to take the movement out of the casing. Then remove the round screw as discussed by Karl. Usually these are right hand......
You can now remove the plate screws and lift the bridge. Sometimes one or two screws are shorter than the other. Take note and replace in the same hole. When the bridge is removed you should be able to remove the mainspring barrel. Unfortunately the setting mechanism often comes loose as well and to get it right you might need to remove the dial.......
It actually kinda confuses me. As I understand, the mainspring is broken when you are winding endlessly so I immediately ordered a replacement online. However, on one occasion it wound again and watch ran perfectly fine.
Then again, one time it is winding endlessly again and no longer runs.

Could there be another problem?
-Nico
 

nico22

Registered User
Jun 10, 2021
26
63
13
32
Country
Hi there!

Just fixed my IT.

Thanks so much! The amount I saved is like buying another one.

Actually I already bought new one and it just arrived. I thought the old one will no longer work.
Now I have two working ITs.

Thanks again!
-Nico

0EA6AE5A-E9E2-4DE1-949A-C8AEFE863E7E.jpeg C98805C1-3F60-49FB-B076-0672934FE7EC.jpeg
 

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