• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Information on Elgin pocket watch

James_in_Utah

Registered User
Apr 30, 2015
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Hi,
My wife inherited an Elgin pocket watch. It is believed to be from the late 1800's early 1900s. If anyone has any information on when this watch was produced that would be very appreciated. Also, how do you adjust the time? Lift crystal and just move the hands? I am only now starting to investigate this watch. It does seem to run. You can see pictures with stamped numbers at this link:


20210118_165745.jpg 20210118_165825.jpg 20210118_165854.jpg 20210118_170117.jpg 20210118_170123.jpg 20210118_170132.jpg 20210118_170201.jpg 20210118_170233.jpg 20210118_170243.jpg 20210118_170325.jpg

Thanks in advance! 20210118_165752.jpg
 
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Kevin W.

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Hello. It would be preferable if you can post pictures from your computer. In years to come they will be lost as the links may not work. Thanks.
 

Bila

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Early 1900's (the first decade), 7 jewel low grade Ladies watch, still a nice piece though and great to have a Family piece. To set the time the crown will pull up, you will feel a slight click, then you can set the hands by turning the crown, once the time is set, push the crown back down to wind:)
 
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musicguy

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Welcome to the NAWCC Forum it's always nice to see a family watch.
circa 1903, grade 269, 0 size, 7 jewels


Rob
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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Hello and welcome!

You have a & jewel, 0 size Elgin grade 269 from a little past the turn of the century. If you can post photos of the trademarks inside of the watch case, we can tell you about the case as well. When this watch was purchased the case and movement came separately with the purchaser having a choice of that they wanted. The movement is one of the more economical choices.

To set the watch, pull out the crown and turn, please do not manually move the hands, it will surely not end well!

Your watch runs, and that is a great sign, but best not to run it very much. Old oil, dirt and dust form an abrasive substance that will damage the moving parts and eventually stop the watch potentially causing drastic repairs. After a good clean and oil, it should work well for years.
 

James_in_Utah

Registered User
Apr 30, 2015
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Early 1900's (the first decade), 7 jewel low grade Ladies watch, still a nice piece though and great to have a Family piece. To set the time the crown will pull up, you will feel a slight click, then you can set the hands by turning the crown, once the time is set, push the crown back down to wind:)
So the story is that it was her father's grandmother's watch. One of his grandmothers was born in 1852 and died in 1932. The other grandmother was born in 1879 and died in 1939. I guess either of them could have owned this watch.
 

James_in_Utah

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Apr 30, 2015
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If you can post photos of the trademarks inside of the watch case, we can tell you about the case as well.
I looked the outside of case over and I don't see a mark of any type. On the inside is the number 4658110. That's the only thing I see on the case. Also I tried pulling up on the crown and didn't feel a snap. I think I will wait until I'm with someone that knows what they are doing.
 
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Downing

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Jun 13, 2020
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Very nice.

Ladies watches were worn as jewelry. Since women didn't wear pants, at least in public, they had no pockets so their watches were smaller than mens and meant to be worn as a pendant on a neck chain. If the case isn't stamped, it's almost certainly "gold filled" rather than 14 or 18K gold. So what you're looking at is a sort of gold sandwich, i.e., two thin outer layers of gold, thicker on the outside of the case and thinner on the inside, with a base metal like brass sandwiched in the middle.

Eligin was by far the biggest American watch manufacturer so there are plenty of available parts out there to use for servicing. Have it serviced by a competent watchmaker and it will run like a top. The dial and hands look to be in great shape and the case engraving is very pretty, so no work needed there.

Congrats. It's a really nice family heirloom.
 
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