Information on Elgin pocket watch

James_in_Utah

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Apr 30, 2015
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Hi,
My wife inherited an Elgin pocket watch. It is believed to be from the late 1800's early 1900s. If anyone has any information on when this watch was produced that would be very appreciated. Also, how do you adjust the time? Lift crystal and just move the hands? I am only now starting to investigate this watch. It does seem to run. You can see pictures with stamped numbers at this link:


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Thanks in advance! 20210118_165752.jpg
 
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Kevin W.

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Hello. It would be preferable if you can post pictures from your computer. In years to come they will be lost as the links may not work. Thanks.
 

Bila

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Early 1900's (the first decade), 7 jewel low grade Ladies watch, still a nice piece though and great to have a Family piece. To set the time the crown will pull up, you will feel a slight click, then you can set the hands by turning the crown, once the time is set, push the crown back down to wind:)
 
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musicguy

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Welcome to the NAWCC Forum it's always nice to see a family watch.
circa 1903, grade 269, 0 size, 7 jewels


Rob
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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Hello and welcome!

You have a & jewel, 0 size Elgin grade 269 from a little past the turn of the century. If you can post photos of the trademarks inside of the watch case, we can tell you about the case as well. When this watch was purchased the case and movement came separately with the purchaser having a choice of that they wanted. The movement is one of the more economical choices.

To set the watch, pull out the crown and turn, please do not manually move the hands, it will surely not end well!

Your watch runs, and that is a great sign, but best not to run it very much. Old oil, dirt and dust form an abrasive substance that will damage the moving parts and eventually stop the watch potentially causing drastic repairs. After a good clean and oil, it should work well for years.
 

James_in_Utah

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Apr 30, 2015
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Early 1900's (the first decade), 7 jewel low grade Ladies watch, still a nice piece though and great to have a Family piece. To set the time the crown will pull up, you will feel a slight click, then you can set the hands by turning the crown, once the time is set, push the crown back down to wind:)
So the story is that it was her father's grandmother's watch. One of his grandmothers was born in 1852 and died in 1932. The other grandmother was born in 1879 and died in 1939. I guess either of them could have owned this watch.
 

James_in_Utah

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Apr 30, 2015
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If you can post photos of the trademarks inside of the watch case, we can tell you about the case as well.
I looked the outside of case over and I don't see a mark of any type. On the inside is the number 4658110. That's the only thing I see on the case. Also I tried pulling up on the crown and didn't feel a snap. I think I will wait until I'm with someone that knows what they are doing.
 
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Downing

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Very nice.

Ladies watches were worn as jewelry. Since women didn't wear pants, at least in public, they had no pockets so their watches were smaller than mens and meant to be worn as a pendant on a neck chain. If the case isn't stamped, it's almost certainly "gold filled" rather than 14 or 18K gold. So what you're looking at is a sort of gold sandwich, i.e., two thin outer layers of gold, thicker on the outside of the case and thinner on the inside, with a base metal like brass sandwiched in the middle.

Eligin was by far the biggest American watch manufacturer so there are plenty of available parts out there to use for servicing. Have it serviced by a competent watchmaker and it will run like a top. The dial and hands look to be in great shape and the case engraving is very pretty, so no work needed there.

Congrats. It's a really nice family heirloom.
 
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