Info on Ma Leck Company ?

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Rookie, Nov 16, 2004.

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  1. Rookie

    Rookie Guest

    Hi, Im trying to find out any info on a clock,With " Ma Leck company Wingate N.C. "
    on the face. I can't find much on the web,And don't have access to the movement. Does look to be a Vintage to newer clock. Any Ideas ?

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  2. David B Pendley

    David B Pendley Registered User
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    Aug 25, 2000
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    Hi Asked this same question before and got no answer. I asked at Carolina's chapter 17 meeting and no one seemed to know. I even went through Wingate phone books. No business listings. I believe the clock I had in was a steeple clock, I'll look and see if I can find photo.
     
  3. Julian Smith

    Julian Smith Registered User

    Sep 1, 2000
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    Ma Leck was a company that made all sorts of wooden objects.All kinds of hat racks,towel racks,ash trays,You name it.The clocks they made had German movements(?) as far as I know.
    The store I worked at sold their stuff and I have a few items myself.
    At one time they had a factory sales store in Elizabethtown NC.
    I don,t know what ever happened to the company.
    J Smith
     
  4. NCjones

    NCjones New Member

    Dec 27, 2011
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    I have the MA Leck grandmother clock. They have Hermele movements. I got the clock at a thrift store, so I have no idea of its value but I visited a clock shop and inquired if they could clean it and and the guy offered me $100 sight unseen. Obviously he's not offering retail value if he's in the clock-selling business, so It must be worth $200 or more.

    MaLeck was a woodcrafting business that Mr. Leck Helms, his wife Mary and brother Bernard started in about 1950. At first Mr. Helms envisioned using local craftsmen to build simple country furniture. His most successful product during the startup years was a child's round wooden swing seat. Building on that success Helms built a factory to manufacture wooden decorative items on US 74 just past the Western town limits of Wingate. Business flourished in the 1960's and the lines were expanded to include clocks, serving pieces, cookware, candles and brass. In the 1970's the factory was expanded to meet the increasing demand for MaLeck products. Separate facilities were built in Wingate and Marshville to produce different items. MaLeck was one of the most profitable woodcraft manufacturing companies in the nation.

    Competition from both domestic and foreign companies soon began to cause problems. Mr. Helms retired and his son became president. The son brought in professional management and paid them handsomely to try and right the ship but the damage was done. Management cut unprofitable lines, sold two divisions and consolidated warehousing and shipping. Still the bloodletting continued. MaLeck was forced to lay off it's long time loyal employees in a last ditch effort to save the company. Just before the bank took over MaLeck had a huge sale trying to pay the bills.

    Today the remnants of the one prosperous main manufacturing plant lie at the western town limits of Wingate. The building's glass and wood front facade proved too fragile after Hurricane Hugo and was pulled down. Today a series of strange brick walls face US 74 across from the Valero Convenience Store. Part of the factory is occupied by a Fire Equipment, "junkque and antique" dealer. Another part is a tire and auto shop and another part is used as a warehouse. The employee parking lot holds a mixture of broken down automobiles, trucks and two old firetrucks.

    The Candle division was a metal building that was located approximately where McDonald's is now located. It was sold to the man who now owns the Candle Shop in Marshville. Shortly after he purchased it burned to the ground. He wasn't discouraged however and managed to rent another former MaLeck building known as the Box Plant and began to produce candles. About a year later, one night the roof fell in crushing everything! He moved his business to Marshville!

    MaLecks' Marshville facility was a long brick building located alongside the railroad tracks at Unarco Rd across from the Food Lion shopping Center. It also burned but the shell of the building still stands.

    The bank owns the property and is successfully renting it. It is doubtful that it will be torn down unless it is unsafe.
     
  5. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

    Feb 12, 2009
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    Welcome here, Chris.
    Hopefully you've got the informations you were looking for...
    Thanks guys, you're swell.:)
    Jurgen
     
  6. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Jan 15, 2004
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    Y'all do realize that Chris posted in November 2004. Oder? But NC's info is well taken.
     
  7. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

    Feb 12, 2009
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    Oh, really? Oops. :rolleyes:
    Jurgen
     
  8. NCjones

    NCjones New Member

    Dec 27, 2011
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    I saw it was a old thread but I figured someone else might be looking for the info as well. I stumbled on the thread by a google search looking for even more info myself.
     
  9. Docs-Clocks

    Docs-Clocks Registered User
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    Mar 15, 2008
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    I just repaired a Ma Leck steeple clock. The mov. Is Franz Hermle time and strike with pendulum. Owner says it was a company in Wingate, N.C. That like a big gift shop even candy. The clock case and dial look almost like the New England Clock Co. Made it. Docs-Clocks
     
  10. Rook333

    Rook333 New Member

    Mar 3, 2019
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    #10 Rook333, Mar 3, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2019
    Hi, I'm looking for information about this type of clock as well, and this forum came up. This clock was in one of the buildings on the house I bought.

    Screenshot_20190303-183031_eBay.jpg
     
  11. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    #11 bruce linde, Mar 3, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2019
    Most of the clocks collectors are looking for are much older... because they don't make 'em like they used to. there are many threads on this message board discussing how to deal with repairs required to fix the unintended consequences of clock manufacturers in the 1800s not foreseeing that the clocks they made would be running a hundred (a hundred and fifty? two hundred?) years later...

    movements made in the 50s onward tend (tend) to be of lesser quality and typically not worth repairing. odds are the movement in yours hasn't been serviced in decades, if ever. (looks like it has side panels.... you could try sliding one out (or open) and taking a photo of the movement, which might prove informational... but probably wouldn't change anything.)

    what you have is more furniture than collectible/desirable clock. if you don't love it, i would recommend donating it to the local museum's white elephant sale, salvation army, etc.
     

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