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History Indentify clock brand

Albinas

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Could someone help to indentify the clock brand

CD0B01C8-71DE-442C-8C7F-0C27A46FC3BE.jpeg
 

Steven Thornberry

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The logo is that of Sölch & Jäckel. A search of the Forums probably will bring up some information.
 
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JTD

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Welcome to the board.

As Steven says, this is the mark of Sölch & Jäckel. The company was founded in 1871 as Sölch & Co. and became Sölch & Jäckel by 1884. The company produced clock cases and used the movements manufactured by other firms. It is thought that they may have produced some movements themselves, but exactly when and how many is not known.

The trade mark on your clock is almost the same as one that was registered by Schlenker & Kienzle in 1899, except that that one had no initials in the centre. In Schmid's Lexikon he writes that Kienzle used this logo on movements which they sold to other clock manufacturers, such as Sölch & Jäckel, so that they could put their own initials in the centre, where you can see the SJ monogram on your clock. So your movement is likely made by Kienzle and cased by Sölch & Jäckel.

JTD
 

bruce linde

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JTD

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H-H Schmid, in 2018, attributed the TM to Carl-Johannes Schlenker.

Junghans Schramberg?? | NAWCC Forums

Was this attribution after his last edition of the Lexikon?

Regards.

Yes, it is after the last edition of the Lexikon (2017). Since Schmid says the attribution to Sölch & Jäckel in the Lexikon is wrong, and since he is the author, I guess we must believe this mark to be Carl Johannes Schlenker.

But I wish I knew where the research which led to this U-turn could be found.

JTD
 

Steven Thornberry

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Yes, it is after the last edition of the Lexikon (2017). Since Schmid says the attribution to Sölch & Jäckel in the Lexikon is wrong, and since he is the author, I guess we must believe this mark to be Carl Johannes Schlenker.

But I wish I knew where the research which led to this U-turn could be found.

JTD
If this is a mark of Carl Johannes Schlenker, I would expect to see a “C”, but I can only find the “J” and the “S”. What am I not understanding here?
 

JTD

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If this is a mark of Carl Johannes Schlenker, I would expect to see a “C”, but I can only find the “J” and the “S”. What am I not understanding here?
Steven, I have just now looked at the logo in the Lexikon with a magnifying glass and you can see a rather small letter 'c' on the vertical stroke of the J. I assumed this was meant to be the '&' of Sölch & Jäckel, but seemingly it's not.

JTD
 

Steven Thornberry

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Steven, I have just now looked at the logo in the Lexikon with a magnifying glass and you can see a rather small letter 'c' on the vertical stroke of the J. I assumed this was meant to be the '&' of Sölch & Jäckel, but seemingly it's not.

JTD
I did the same in my first ed. of the Sölch & Jäckel article in the Lexikon, but without the magnifying glass. I could see what appeared to be a small "C" in the logo. I find it curious that the "C" is so "understated." I also find it curious that no one has pointed this out to us here, before (at least, not so far as I could find). As you wondered before, what research lies behind this change of attribution? To be fair, H-HS does mention in his first ed., that S&J took a Schlenker-Kienzle logo and added their initials in the middle.
 

Tatyana

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I am sure that the topic of the relationship between Jacob Kienzle and Carl-Johannes Schlenker is worthy of a full-fledged article.
So far, I have only statistics collected over 5 years.
The movements that are made by Schlenker's company are about 200 pieces, Kienzle is an order of magnitude larger.

The Schlenker company was established in 1897, in 1899 it was bought out by Kienzle.
The largest serial number of the Schlenker is 119_821.

119_821.jpg

I believe that these large numbers belong to the 190X, i.e. under the management of Kienzle.

It is curious that among the serial numbers there is a large gap between the numbers 69_XXX and 100_XXX.
I believe that there was a moment of cooperation with the firm T. Haller, which in this period (1900 +) had a difficult period of cooperation with Junghans.

Movements with an official stamp (caduceus) I have about 90 pieces.
Movements with the Eagle 101.
There are 68 movements in the Schlenker numbering.

5_3Х6.jpg 61_903.jpg

33 of them in the general Kienzle numbering in the period 1897-1903.

464_925_Kienzle_1897_год.jpg 628_690.jpg

Eagles with letters stopped appearing with 26_XXXX numbers, from this I make the assumption that things were not going well for Schlenker and the absence of letters in the center of the signature indicates the decline of the company's activities.

26_211.jpg

Among the movements of Schlenker there are signatures
Gloria (12 pieces), H. Th. M (4 pieces) and and rare:
9_613.jpg 10_863.jpg 14_299_C.J.Schlenker.jpg 28_711.jpg 48_767.jpg 51_292.jpg 17_696.jpg 21_060.jpg


By the way, Gloria can often be seen on the movements of Kienzle (1897-1906).

502_602.jpg 659-237.jpg

Regards
Tatyana
 

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