• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

I'm JUST getting started

Dan Top

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Sep 22, 2020
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I was given a Howard Miller Urban II with a broken cable that needed work, so I fixed it - and had a BALL doing so. I also inherited an old Kienzle that my great grandparents brought over from Poland, which desperately needs service. I found this forum when looking for pictures of the Kienzle, and got HOOKED on clock repair (I'm the family gunsmith as well). So, I took a bunch of on-line courses, bought a "junker" movement just to "practice on". I cleaned off the corrosion, straightened out some bent pins, and actually got it running! The parts that limit the chime striker to the current hour are missing, so when it starts swinging, it keeps going until the cows come home, or until time advances enough to hit a limiter on the hour barrel. It would be neat to find other components to complete it, but the only marks on it are the little clock face with the hands on it, and the numbers "4367" and "15". Does anyone know what it is? I plan to make a box and face for it, and get some hands, and I'd LIKE to make it a chimer if I could.

IMG_3620.JPG IMG_3621.JPG
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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I also have a ball fixing clock movements, so you have come to the right place. Yes, your striking movement is definitely missing the rack hook, which would have gone on the post just above the rack in your photo. Can’t see the logo clearly, but it looks like the mark of Urgos.
 

Dan Top

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Sep 22, 2020
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Thanks. My camera isn't good at closeups, but the logo is a clock dial with numbers around it, hands at 10 and 7 (left side), and 4 chime bars hanging down the right side of the dial face. That rack of serrations gets engaged by the pin sticking forward on the face, just below the gear that drives the chime regulator fan blade, but it just falls back into place. (One day I'll learn the nomen.) It sure is fun to watch. It didn't come with a pendulum weight, but the "crutch" (I think that's what it is) has been swinging and releasing for a couple of days after overhaul.
 

Steven Thornberry

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My camera isn't good at closeups, but the logo is a clock dial with numbers around it, hands at 10 and 7 (left side),
So the logo is like this, yes? If so, it is Urgos, formerly Haller, Jauch & Pabst. It was registered Aug. 25, 1923. Urgos is, BTW, Uhren und GongFabrik Schwennigen.

bildmarke_urgos4.jpg
 

Dan Top

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Thanks. It doesn't have the name above the logo, and has "15" stamped on the back plate, which I'm coming to learn might be the year it was made. That's DEFINITELY the mark, though. This is just SO MUCH FUN! Thanks for welcoming me.
 

Steven Thornberry

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Thanks. It doesn't have the name above the logo, and has "15" stamped on the back plate, which I'm coming to learn might be the year it was made. That's DEFINITELY the mark, though. This is just SO MUCH FUN! Thanks for welcoming me.
Yes, well, the logo apparently was used without the name, wie so:

bildmarke_urgos.jpg

The "15" is likely not the year of manufacture, but possibly the pendulum length in centimeters.

BTW, the term "chimer" would not be correct for this movement. A "chimer" clock would play a tune, such as the Westminster chime, and have three winding arbors. Your has only two winding arbors and, thus, would be a "striker," counting the hours and, possibly, the half-hours.
 

Dan Top

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Sep 22, 2020
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Those are GREAT tips, particularly the pendulum length, thanks. I actually DID remember learning the difference between the striker and chime when you mentioned it, but appreciate the pointer. I forgot and used the wrong term (probably NOT the only one I've used or WILL use again).
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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You're right, without the rack hook, the rack will just keep falling down. Hang on to the movement, because as you get better, you’ll figure out a way to fix it.
nngerman1.jpg
 

Dan Top

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Sep 22, 2020
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That's why I wanted to get it identified, so I just MIGHT find "the rest of the clock" parts somewhere and get this one complete. I don't think I really will, but if not, it's STILL neat. I also got a couple of other designs and manufacturers (that I KNOW what they are) to see how other designs are built. I'm playing with it now (and doing my homework) trying now to figure out the best way to adjust the strip recoil anchor.
 
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