If you could go back in time,

Isaac

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And have coffee/tea with a singular clockmaker/watchmaker of your choice, who would it be?

I would likely choose Charles Jacques, due to his innovation for chiming clocks. It would make for a very interesting discussion.

Who would your pick be?
 

bruce linde

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simon willard. abraham breguet. thomas tompion. edward john dent.

i'll come up with more for next week's visits. :)
 
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chimeclockfan

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Otto Muller, the clock director of Geo. Borgfeldt & Co. following the death of Charles Jacques. Though largely unknown to horological circles, it would be interesting to hear what he thought about continuing Jacques' chime clock department & more about the development of the Celebrate mantel chime clock line.
 

Ticktocktime100

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A very interesting and somewhat difficult thread topic, Isaac! Amongst English makers, I’d choose Thomas Tompion and Thomas Mudge. Amongst French ones, I’d have to go for Abraham-Louis Bréguet and Ferdinand Berthoud. However, I don’t want to leave out Jean-Antoine Lépine and Pierre Le Roy.

Best regards,

JJ
 

Chris Radano

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Walter Archer, John Sanderson, Jacob Custer, Isaac Thomas (Willistown, PA), And George Hoff to name a few.
Also a few makers of some of the unsigned, but interesting Continental clocks of the 17th and 18th centuries.
But be careful, I imagine some of the famous clockmakers did not have much time for chat.
 

jmclaugh

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I'd need a Babel fish for French makers so an afternoon with George Graham and John Harrison.
 

gmorse

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I'd add Thomas Mudge to Jonathan's two, but wouldn't it be great to sit with John Arnold and Thomas Earnshaw, (if you could stop them arguing for long enough!). Also, Dr. Nevil Maskelyne has had a very bad press over the Harrison longitude business, so it would be interesting to hear his side of it.
 

Levi Hutchins

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I'd add Thomas Mudge to Jonathan's two, but wouldn't it be great to sit with John Arnold and Thomas Earnshaw, (if you could stop them arguing for long enough!). Also, Dr. Nevil Maskelyne has had a very bad press over the Harrison longitude business, so it would be interesting to hear his side of it.
Maskelyne's perspective would be of interest.

20 years after Longitude... rewriting “villainous” Maskelyne @beckyfh

Having the Arnolds over for tea would undoubtedly make for sprightly conversation:

Name help for 20th c. clockmakers
 
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Jim DuBois

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i am impartial to your choice issac.

I'll betcha Elmer Stennis would have made for a good laugh.
I met Elmer Stennis in Cleaveland at the National in 1975, a month or so before he was shot and killed. I do not remember that conversation fondly. I was a newby, he was a seasoned veteran, and he wore his status with a large side of ego, and he was not helpful or friendly.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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I met Elmer Stennis in Cleaveland at the National in 1975, a month or so before he was shot and killed. I do not remember that conversation fondly. I was a newby, he was a seasoned veteran, and he wore his status with a large side of ego, and he was not helpful or friendly.
Surprised you didn't say you would like to go back in time and meet Joseph Ives!

I have heard many stories about Mr. Stennis from those in the clock world and antiques world who had known him and his family personally. In fact, I once lived in E. Weymouth very close to 1 Tick Tock Lane where he lived. I knew quite well the now deceased antique dealer (Norm McCullough) who bought his house. Even visited.

His family was something. I worked with a nurse who grew up in E. Weymouth and still lives there. She knew the Stennis' well. She recalled that the son who was suspected of shooting him and his new wife (never proven) used to show up for junior high school falling down drunk. By the way, his alibi for the night of Stennis' shooting: he passed out and so he couldn't have possibly driven from NH to Weymouth that night.

Hard to believe such a nice guy like the late Foster Campos worked for Stennis.

If I were restricted to going back in time just to meet clock makers and provided my doing so would not alter subsequent history (i.e., the "butterfly effect"), I would stipulate 2 guys: Ives and Silas B. Terry. My question to both, especially the latter, would be "What the heck were you thinking?"

Honestly, if I had the ability for time travel, I would elect to meet Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. Even though the latter's ideas have not quite stood the test of time in their specifics, I think no 2 figures in modern history have done more to shape the way we look at ourselves and the universe around us except for maybe Charles Darwin...okay, I guess I would want add him to my list, too.

RM
 

PatH

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Although it would be wonderful to talk with the horological giants previously mentioned, I'd like to talk with some of the early dollar watch folks around Waterbury and Cheshire CT:
  1. Archibald Bannatyne who was responsible for many of Waterbury Clock Co clock patents, along with the watches that were created for Ingersoll, although his genius was never really acknowledged.
  2. D.A.A. Buck, a watchmaker who created a working steam engine that would fit under a thimble, designed the long-wind watch, started the creation of the Waterbury Watch Co's monumental clock that was displayed at the 1893 World's Fair, designed Cheshire Watch Company's production watch, invented and produced items ranging from timepieces to clockwork toys to cameras
  3. William N. Weeden who was a jeweler and engraver, was instrumental in getting the Waterbury Watch Co and Cheshire Watch Co watches into production, patented brass lamp improvements, experimented with early color printing, and invented and produced many toys (probably best known for Weeden steam engines that delighted children for decades)
  4. Arthur E. Hotchkiss who was instrumental in getting the Cheshire Watch Co started (too bad his watch design wasn't what was needed), created clocks for Cheshire Clock Co, patented clockwork toys, and is probably best known for his Hotchkiss bicycle railroad Hotchkiss Bicycle Railroad - Wikipedia
 

Jim DuBois

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Surprised you didn't say you would like to go back in time and meet Joseph Ives!

I have heard many stories about Mr. Stennis from those in the clock world and antiques world who had known him and his family personally. In fact, I once lived in E. Weymouth very close to 1 Tick Tock Lane where he lived. I knew quite well the now deceased antique dealer (Norm McCullough) who bought his house. Even visited.

His family was something. I worked with a nurse who grew up in E. Weymouth and still lives there. She knew the Stennis' well. She recalled that the son who was suspected of shooting him and his new wife (never proven) used to show up for junior high school falling down drunk. By the way, his alibi for the night of Stennis' shooting: he passed out and so he couldn't have possibly driven from NH to Weymouth that night.

Hard to believe such a nice guy like the late Foster Campos worked for Stennis.

If I were restricted to going back in time just to meet clock makers and provided my doing so would not alter subsequent history (i.e., the "butterfly effect"), I would stipulate 2 guys: Ives and Silas B. Terry. My question to both, especially the latter, would be "What the heck were you thinking?"

Honestly, if I had the ability for time travel, I would elect to meet Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. Even though the latter's ideas have not quite stood the test of time in their specifics, I think no 2 figures in modern history have done more to shape the way we look at ourselves and the universe around us except for maybe Charles Darwin...okay, I guess I would want add him to my list, too.

RM
I was just tweaking Brian with my comment regarding Stennis. I think both you and I have met some of the NAWCC founding fathers as well as many oldtimers and seasoned long term collectors. As an aside, I want to know how a kid like Steve Sandborn can be an oldtimer by the way? But, of all the people I have met, Stennis is the only one I remember as being a jerk from his first words to me. But, I digress.

And Foster Campos? You have a good question there. He and Stennis must have been oil and water. He was an absolute gentleman in every conversation I ever had with him. He helped me on a fair number of occasions with hard to find new parts and he willingly shared anything he had that I needed. Things like his excellent timepiece brass bezels, really nice finials, inlaid veneer for cross banding timepiece doors on and on...

And yes, I would like a conversation with Joseph Ives. I can add another to my list, Jacob Custer. We have beaten him about on the MB, but the Bulletin has very little on him, 3 pieces in 75 years to be precise. There is quite a bit published on him elsewhere so I have been recently working on a piece for the Bulletin about Custer, pulling in what else can be found on his various works. He may have been slightly more screwy than Mr. Ives.

We shall see if the powers that be think he worth publication, or better put, what I have assembled is worth publication.
 

The Treasured Clock

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If I would go back in time, I probably would be sailing with John Harrison testing one of his clocks on one of the ships resolving the longitude problem. I would be talking to him about clocks and its use of future chronometers to determine longitude.
Jonathan Lee Jones
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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I was just tweaking Brian with my comment regarding Stennis. I think both you and I have met some of the NAWCC founding fathers as well as many oldtimers and seasoned long term collectors. As an aside, I want to know how a kid like Steve Sandborn can be an oldtimer by the way? But, of all the people I have met, Stennis is the only one I remember as being a jerk from his first words to me. But, I digress.

And Foster Campos? You have a good question there. He and Stennis must have been oil and water. He was an absolute gentleman in every conversation I ever had with him. He helped me on a fair number of occasions with hard to find new parts and he willingly shared anything he had that I needed. Things like his excellent timepiece brass bezels, really nice finials, inlaid veneer for cross banding timepiece doors on and on...

And yes, I would like a conversation with Joseph Ives. I can add another to my list, Jacob Custer. We have beaten him about on the MB, but the Bulletin has very little on him, 3 pieces in 75 years to be precise. There is quite a bit published on him elsewhere so I have been recently working on a piece for the Bulletin about Custer, pulling in what else can be found on his various works. He may have been slightly more screwy than Mr. Ives.

We shall see if the powers that be think he worth publication, or better put, what I have assembled is worth publication.
Sounds like an interesting and worthwhile project. I look forward to seeing it.

Custer seems to have marched to the beat of his own drummer in the way he did things, e.g., the strike trains on his clocks.

RM
 

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