If you could buy 1 antique clock...

Isaac

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A seemingly simple yet not so simple question (for some of us). If price was not an issue and you are able to pick 1 antique antique clock in factory new condition, what would you choose? Time frame doesn’t matter, either.

For me, I’d have to say a triple fusee Winterhalder, Lenzkirch, LFS, etc that plays on 8 coiled gongs. All the examples I’ve heard with whittington on coiled gongs sound awesome. Although I wouldn’t mind New Haven’s line of earlier chime clocks #2 - #5 with the willcock resonator and smaller coiled gongs.

What would you buy new?
 

JTD

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That is a truly terrible question to ask! I agree with all/any of your choices (I actually have a New Haven with the Willcock mechanism), and especially the Lenzkirchs. To those you have mentioned, I would add some of the odder clocks, such as one of the wall-mounted torsion clocks, that you see in books but never in real life. I'd like a year-runner Vienna regulator. I've always wanted one of the massive calendar clocks made by Gebrüder Wilde (someone posted on here about one recently).

And so on............but you wanted just 1. I don't know......but you didn't fix on any particular one either!

JTD
 

Les harland

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I am not sure if the clock I would like exists
It would be a Great Northern Railway (UK railroad) dial clock
I have seen London Northeastern Railway, successor to GNR clocks but not a GNR one
 

Willie X

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I'm simple minded. Give me a S-T #2 in a walnut case. When can I pick it up ... :) Willie X
 

chimeclockfan

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This Elite hall clock with a solid Oak case and 9 tubular bells.
Such a thing in reality is constrained by lack of condominium space, but does not hold me back from admiring such clocks regardless.

383.jpg
 

Chris Radano

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I already have the 1 clock. It's this one (post #4):
Your Favourite Clock
WHY this clock? The movement. With an English double fusee, you get many years of consistent, reliable service. Nooooo, it's not the best sounding, best looking, most interesting, most desirable, or most complicated. It is a clock that can be your faithful companion for many years, and won't let you down. This is a comfort movement, there are clock movements that don't use as much brass or steel. But I'll take the massive movement because that's something that's hard to find in today's world....simple quality. The English double fusee strikes the hours, so it's not excessively noisy but it's still practical. Just give me something that can be relied upon, solid and unwavering.
 

novicetimekeeper

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I'm still looking for a centre verge lantern clock. There wouldn't have been a factory though.
 

MartinM

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I doubt the Royal Observatory would part with it.
So, I might have to settle for one of Houdin's 'mystery' clocks.
 
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Isaac

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This Elite hall clock with a solid Oak case and 9 tubular bells.
Such a thing in reality is constrained by lack of condominium space, but does not hold me back from admiring such clocks regardless.

View attachment 486887
That is very nice. I was looking at a few catalogs from 1905 that had some very high end 9 bell clocks, ~$20,000 was the cost from one of them when you factor in inflation. I've always pondered why tubular bells were so popular - some people say that it sounds like church bells and others say they sound like wind chimes. To me, they sound too clangy. Maybe I've just not yet heard a $20,000 dollar tubular chime ;)

I'd love to see a tubular chime clock with tuned wind chimes and a setup where the hammers hit the lower portions of the tubes versus hitting them at the very top near the cap. I'd bet it'd sound awesome.
 

MLS

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Congreve, year Vienna, houdin mystery, a few different French gilts with candelabras. I would have a hard time narrowing it down.
 

zedric

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One of Dent's truly giant sized carriage clocks (the ones you can't pick up without straining your back), with chronometer escapement, moon-phase indicator and westminster chime would be nice...
 

chimeclockfan

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That is very nice. I was looking at a few catalogs from 1905 that had some very high end 9 bell clocks, ~$20,000 was the cost from one of them when you factor in inflation. I've always pondered why tubular bells were so popular - some people say that it sounds like church bells and others say they sound like wind chimes. To me, they sound too clangy. Maybe I've just not yet heard a $20,000 dollar tubular chime ;)

I'd love to see a tubular chime clock with tuned wind chimes and a setup where the hammers hit the lower portions of the tubes versus hitting them at the very top near the cap. I'd bet it'd sound awesome.
Capped tubes tend to sound nicer than those without caps. Out of all the UTube recordings I'd say this video really conveys tubular bells at their best. It's not a very old clock but among the better offerings of the time. Great rich deep sound, really reminiscent of church bells. Case is also nice. Given its pristine condition it's more of less 'like new' as if we were back in 1970.

 

jmclaugh

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Tough question but I'd go for a chamfer top Georgian or Regency bracket clock with a 5 pillar twin fusee movement, hour strike, pull repeat, a Thwaites & Reed one would do.
 

gmorse

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Hi,

There's one specific clock I'd love to have, but unfortunately it's in the safe keeping of the BM; it's Thomas Mudge's Experimental Lever-Escapement Clock.

Regards,

Graham
 
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Isaac

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Capped tubes tend to sound nicer than those without caps. Out of all the UTube recordings I'd say this video really conveys tubular bells at their best. It's not a very old clock but among the better offerings of the time. Great rich deep sound, really reminiscent of church bells. Case is also nice. Given its pristine condition it's more of less 'like new' as if we were back in 1970.

Good sound. I saw a W&H bracket clock with small tubular chimes mounted in the case. Everything looked original and it sounded really unique - wouldn't mind owning one of those too :rolleyes:
 

Bruce Barnes

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A patented timepiece with an alarm system, I had one lined up from the estate of a deceased east coast professor and it was available then " POOF " it was gone....
 

brian fisher

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That is very nice. I was looking at a few catalogs from 1905 that had some very high end 9 bell clocks, ~$20,000 was the cost from one of them when you factor in inflation. I've always pondered why tubular bells were so popular - some people say that it sounds like church bells and others say they sound like wind chimes. To me, they sound too clangy. Maybe I've just not yet heard a $20,000 dollar tubular chime ;)

I'd love to see a tubular chime clock with tuned wind chimes and a setup where the hammers hit the lower portions of the tubes versus hitting them at the very top near the cap. I'd bet it'd sound awesome.

the value of that clock is much more so in the cabinet than the movement. check out these crazy shenanigans:

Horner Mahogany 9 Tube Grandfather Clock

ORNATE TALL CLOCK BY HERSCHEDE, WITH MCGILL UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION

I don't know much about the first clock but the second one sold for 19k because of that awesome carved cabinet. a basic gothic herschede with that same 9 tube movement would have sold at any given traditional auction for at least 10x less.

as to the nature of this thread, I guess I already own a couple clocks that have been on my wish list for a long time. my 11 tube Jacques/elite is pretty up there for me. I prefer a 13 tube, but gf clock space is starting to become a premium in our household so I may just settle for the 11 and call it awesome enough. we will see.....as already posted in a previous thread, I do know of a local 13 tube that is burning a hole in my sensibilities.


also, I really want one of those burl veneer dutch hall clocks with the fancy face and 13 or so nested bells. something like this one:

A DUTCH WALNUT MUSICAL LONGCASE CLOCK, PIETER BRAMER, AMSTERDAM, CIRCA 1775 |
 

chimeclockfan

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You get the same phenomenon with virtually every clock - if the case is more heavily carved and ornate, it will always sustain a higher price than the same type of clock with a plainer case. Check out these two Kienzle box regulators, one with a heavily carved renaissance-inspired case and the other with a plainer design. Same basic movements, dials, pendulums, gong rods, overall build quality... yet the renaissance clock sustained a much higher price when sold. To the eyes of many, the case makes the value.

RHO09-FrBoxClockFrontLG.jpg DSC00348.jpg
 

Bruce Barnes

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chimeclockfan, an excellent point,like the old real estate adage "curb appeal".
 

novicetimekeeper

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You get the same phenomenon with virtually every clock - if the case is more heavily carved and ornate, it will always sustain a higher price than the same type of clock with a plainer case. Check out these two Kienzle box regulators, one with a heavily carved renaissance-inspired case and the other with a plainer design. Same basic movements, dials, pendulums, gong rods, overall build quality... yet the renaissance clock sustained a much higher price when sold. To the eyes of many, the case makes the value.

View attachment 487032 View attachment 487033

Completely the opposite over here, a heavily carved longcase is just so much firewood usually.
 

prideofmatchingham

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If there were just one clock one could afford, I would want a 12 or more tune musical, day, date, month calendar, moonphase verge triple fusee in a nice brass inlaid case.

Seems too much to ask!
 

zedric

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If there were just one clock one could afford, I would want a 12 or more tune musical, day, date, month calendar, moonphase verge triple fusee in a nice brass inlaid case.

Seems too much to ask!
Did you have any luck getting a set of bells for that lacquered case bracket clock you bought?
 

prideofmatchingham

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Not yet Zedric, though that may not be the most important tasks yet. Bells would be cast. Its the recreation of correct tune which is taking time, in addition to my financials.
 

novicetimekeeper

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I think that for me if there could only be one it would have to be Dorset made, and very early, which is a problem as clockmaking seems to have come late to such a rural area.

However a centre verge lantern clock with a penny moon feature would be a win for me wherever it were made.
 

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