Identify this clock

tlw1344

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Can anyone identify this clock? It is a very tall clock and I'm not sure the time period it was made. Do I have all the parts for the clock? How do I put the pendulum on and where does the key insert to wind it? Any information would be helpful.

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It has one weight.

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This is the key that came with the clock. Where would you wind the clock?

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I would guess this is the pendulum with has liquid mercury.

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I guest this pendulum would attach.


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This is the top of the pendulum?? I do not see how to attach it to the rod.
IMG_0285.jpg IMG_0283.jpg IMG_0284.jpg
 

eemoore

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Can anyone identify this clock? It is a very tall clock and I'm not sure the time period it was made. Do I have all the parts for the clock? How do I put the pendulum on and where does the key insert to wind it? Any information would be helpful.

View attachment 715107

View attachment 715108

View attachment 715109
It has one weight.

View attachment 715110
This is the key that came with the clock. Where would you wind the clock?

View attachment 715111
I would guess this is the pendulum with has liquid mercury.

View attachment 715113
I guest this pendulum would attach.


View attachment 715116
This is the top of the pendulum?? I do not see how to attach it to the rod.
View attachment 715118 View attachment 715112 View attachment 715115
This is quite a clock! One way to find the winding arbor is to remove the face of the clock and then see where the cord is attached . It would have to be attached to a winding drum with an arbor that would fit your key. The pendulum leader might fit through the square hole in the pendulum , Does the knob on the end of the leader screw off? just guessing since I am certainly not familiar with this type of pendulum. Hopefully someone else can give you an answer.
 

zedric

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The type of clock you have is called a regulator - they are typically built for accuracy and we're used, for example, as the reference clock for a clockmaker who would use it as a reference to regulate all of the other clocks.

To wind the clock, you probably need to open the dial cover, which may be hiding the winding hole - can you post a photo of the dial with the glass bezel open?

are you able to take a clear photo with the door open, from inside the case looking up towards the dial?

I assume the hood of the clock comes off, so it would also be good to see some photos showing the movement and top of the case when the hood is removed - with some of these regulators the pendulum attaches to the backboard.
 
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bruce linde

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OK… You have some issues to deal with. The most pressing issue is the single jar partially filled with mercury. That jar is supposed to be full, at which point it would weigh about 15 pounds. The fact that most of the mercury is gone is disconcerting because there might be mercury contamination in the case. Yes, it's the fumes of mercury that are dangerous, but you should definitely Google mercury contamination and be better informed about what you're dealing with.

The practical issue of only having that much mercury is twofold: the first issue is that a movement is designed to run a larger heavier pendulum. The second issue is that what defines the length of the pendulum… And the accuracy of the clock… Is the center of mass at the bottom of the pendulum. as you can imagine, the center of mass of a full jar of mercury is going to be higher than with what you currently have… Meaning that even if you get it running as is the clock is going to run very slow.

This is a quality precision regulator. It is worth putting time and money into to get running. to mount the jar to the pendulum rod, remove the nut and then slide the jar holder up onto the rod... you can see where the square shaft will fit through the square hole in the holder. The nut gets mounted underneath that part back onto the bottom of the pendulum rod. I have used little lead weight pieces that are used in scuba diving equipment to fill mercury jars so I didn't have to use mercury… But this requires tweaking the overall length of the pendulum as lead does not weigh as much as mercury so the center of mass is not as easy to find.

The movement is definitely going to want servicing, and the dial is going to want to re-silvering. it probably winds through a hole in the hour hand. The hook on the weight is funky… Even though there's enough JB Weld there to hold it, it would probably be best to remove it and put a new hook in.

step one would be to take it apart and take lots of clear well lit photos from all angles to know exactly what you're dealing with. Next step would be to have the movement serviced. Re-silvering dials is easy and fun, and there are many threads here on the forum about that process. if it were mine I would immediately replace the weight cord, as well.

even though it has a lot of promise, it does have issues that need to be dealt with. the case looks english, gothic and late 1880s to me, but the montgomery alabama thing seems at odds with that. a clear photo of the maker name on the dial would allow some google research.

i think that's enough to get you started, yes? :)
 

tlw1344

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This is quite a clock! One way to find the winding arbor is to remove the face of the clock and then see where the cord is attached . It would have to be attached to a winding drum with an arbor that would fit your key. The pendulum leader might fit through the square hole in the pendulum , Does the knob on the end of the leader screw off? just guessing since I am certainly not familiar with this type of pendulum. Hopefully someone else can give you an answer.
The diameter of the square holes are different sizes.
 

tlw1344

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The type of clock you have is called a regulator - they are typically built for accuracy and we're used, for example, as the reference clock for a clockmaker who would use it as a reference to regulate all of the other clocks.

To wind the clock, you probably need to open the dial cover, which may be hiding the winding hole - can you post a photo of the dial with the glass bezel open?

are you able to take a clear photo with the door open, from inside the case looking up towards the dial?

I assume the hood of the clock comes off, so it would also be good to see some photos showing the movement and top of the case when the hood is removed - with some of these regulators the pendulum attaches to the backboard.
This clock was given to a museum. The clock is about 9 ft tall but I have not taken the bonnet off yet to see the movement. I need 3 people to hold the clock and take the bonnet off. I will post pictures of the movement later.
 
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eemoore

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The diameter of the square holes are different sizes.
I am a little confused. Are you saying that the metal rod ( with the screw removed )is too large to go through the square in the jar holder? Apparently Mr. Linde had the same thought as I had. He obviously know more about this clock than I do so perhaps he can give you some better advice. Good luck.
 
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tlw1344

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I am a little confused. Are you saying that the metal rod ( with the screw removed )is too large to go through the square in the jar holder? Apparently Mr. Linde had the same thought as I had. He obviously know more about this clock than I do so perhaps he can give you some better advice. Good luck.
. Yes, you are correct
The diameter of the square holes are different sizes.
I can not remember which is smaller but they are not the same size. I'm thinking the square with the screw is larger than the square hole on the jar.
 

zedric

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I assume you have worked out how to wind it now, I think Peter was correct on that. Apart from the pendulum, I’d there anything else you are looking for?
 

shutterbug

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I love the simplicity of that movement design. Especially the large center wheel! Very cool.
 
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eemoore

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. Yes, you are correct

I can not remember which is smaller but they are not the same size. I'm thinking the square with the screw is larger than the square hole on the jar.
Is there any one else on this forum that can suggest how to attach the jar holder to the pendulum. Mr. Linde and I thought that the once the knob was removed the metal rod would go through the holder and the knob would then be attached again to the pendulum rod. However the OP is saying the rod is too large to pass through the square hole piece. This is rather baffling ! Any suggestions ?
 

shutterbug

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How about a pic of that part?
 

Vernon

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. Yes, you are correct

I can not remember which is smaller but they are not the same size. I'm thinking the square with the screw is larger than the square hole on the jar.
The hole looks to be hand cut and out of square. I assume that you tried rotating 180 degrees to check the fit? The jar looks like there is a crack at the bottom?

Vernon
 
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shutterbug

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Looks to me that something is missing from the top of the jar.
 

zedric

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Yes, I was wondering if there is supposed to be some type of adaptor or metal part that the rod would attach to. Thanks for your thoughts.
It would most likely be a one second pendulum, so if you put the pieces of the pendulum together on a bench, is it the right length as is, or does it appear to be missing pieces?
 

Ralph

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What is the name on the dial? It looks like Belshaw.

It appears to be a 3 wheel clock? The gear train counts would be interesting.
 

demoman3955

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Looking at the photos, something just occurred to me after looking at what hes saying is a key. I have a clock that has 2 of them, and they are dummies that fit into the movement and align with the winding holes in the dial to make it look like a regular clock that needs a key. On mine, it uses a chain that you pull the chain to raise the weight. It gets even stranger but its too hard for me to explain, so maybe its time to take photos and start a new thread. here is a photo i have available, and the winding holes have the dummy winding arbors

IMG_1739.JPG
 

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