Identify item found in Grandfather Clock cabinet

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by G S Biddle, Sep 1, 2019.

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  1. G S Biddle

    G S Biddle New Member

    Aug 26, 2019
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    Hello I am new to this forum.
    My wife and I recently purchased a Wilhelm Tribbensee large cabinet clock at an estate auction.
    I have always wanted one of these.
    I think the clock is a early 1980's production?
    I have a local service tech scheduled to service the clock next week.
    I seems to keep pretty accurate time.
    The chimes are somewhat slow at the quarter hours. I looked inside the clock when it was chiming and the governor flap or butterfly will turn at a good speed but at each event it slows to a crawl then goes at good speed till the next event then it slows down again.
    The hands are off at each event too.
    I have read a lot so far and realize the clock need some service.
    The instruction manual and some other promotional paper were in the bottom of the cabinet.
    Also in the bottom of the cabinet was the device to wind the clock and two threaded pins with knobs on the end.
    they are about 3 inches long with fine threads and a knob on the end.
    In my reading different articles and watching several videos I have never seen the knobs mentioned.
    I have attached pictures.
    Can anyone advise me what these items are for?

    IMG_20190824_144849665.jpg IMG_20190824_144906103.jpg IMG_20190827_165436416_BURST000_COVER.jpg IMG_20190901_082328988.jpg
     
  2. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Apr 25, 2005
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    Welcome to the board.

    Wilhem Tribbensee are still in business today:

    Wilhelm Tribbensee Uhrenshop Wanduhren Standuhren

    They are apparently retailers of clocks (as opposed to clockmakers) and a review of previous threads indicate that they have recently used Kieninger and Urgos movements in their cabinets.

    Someone should be along to answer your question about the hardware.

    If you want to know the vintage of your clock, we will need to see pictures of the back of the movement.

    Regards.
     
  3. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    we need to see photos of the movement, but it looks like a nice clock.

    my guess is that your mysterious pins go through the feet attached to the dial and hold the dial in place against the front plate. dial feet have holes in them and the pins go sideways thru the holes to prevent the feet from pulling out. i predict photos will reveal two pins (hopefully!) in place and two left out.

    photos of the movement might reveal its maker, probably Kieninger
     
  4. G S Biddle

    G S Biddle New Member

    Aug 26, 2019
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    OK now I have some more information.
    On the back of the movement:

    UW3038B (This is stamped on left side)

    (All this is stamped in the center.)
    URGOS
    MADE IN GERMANY
    NO (0) JEWELS
    390226
     
  5. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Jan 1, 2005
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    Pins look to me like seatboard screws (or rail screws for rail mount). Bruce is probably closer to right.
     
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  6. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Or maybe leveling screws?
     
  7. TEACLOCKS

    TEACLOCKS Registered User
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    Mar 22, 2005
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    These screws are for transporting the movement they lock the chime drum from rocking lose right to left and turning

    IMG_20190901_082328988.jpg

    For an Urgos 9 tube movement
     
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  8. G S Biddle

    G S Biddle New Member

    Aug 26, 2019
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    That makes sense.
    Now where are the threads they screw into?
    I can see a threaded hole on each side of the movement plate in line with that drum.
    I screwed one of the pins in a couple of turns on the right side plate, and the threads match but on the left side there are levers that would prevent line up to start the pin in the hole and those two holes are in line with the drum.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Probably best to just drop them back into the bottom of the cabinet before you mess something up. :)
    Willie X
     
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  10. Dick Feldman

    Dick Feldman Registered User

    Sep 1, 2000
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    You have a very nice clock. The Urgos Clock Company has been out of business for over 30 years. The remnants of the business were bought by Hermle. Hermle makes a new movement that will fit the case and function as the original. Being 30+ years old does not make your movement vintage. During its lifetime, the movement has had time to become unreliable (a few times) due to wear. I mention this because your description is of a worn movement. Maybe the movement is not worn out, but probably in the last stages of its lifetime. Servicing the clock (such as clean, oil and adjust) will likely be a waste of time and money. Urgos movements also had a bad habit of the escape wheel teeth wearing with long use. The symptom for that is the clock will irregularly gain time regardless of the adjustment. It is common to find the verge skipping teeth on the escape wheel once in a while. There are new escape wheels available for some models but not all. Installation of an escape wheel requires some machine work.
    Your chances of finding an original Urgos movement not ready for an overhaul or replacement are slim to none.
    I hope the clock was a bargain.
    To make the clock operate reliably (properly rebuild or replacement of the movement), it will likely take a substantial investment.
    Best Regards,
    Dick
     

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