Ideas Smooth / Burnish newly installed sold Brass Bushing

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ChrisCam, Jan 14, 2018.

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  1. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User

    Dec 9, 2017
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    Hi Guys,
    OK my first attempt at inserting a solid brass bush into my previously over broached hole (just as an experiment) on an old clock plate has gone moderately well. I ended up not cutting the solid brass wire with my jewelers saw but put the brass in my quick release drill press vice and cut it approx 1.5 mm longer than plate thickness with a 12 inch hacksaw. I made the hole the same size as the wire and put a countersink on both sides to get better hold. I put the clock plate down (oil sink side up) on a metal block and carefully hammered with 4 oz hammer. On the side where the pivots go almost but not entirely smooth.
    My question is firstly what is the best way to ensure a smooth surface on this new bush and secondly if a clock plate has light scratches what is the best way to remove them.

    The oil sink side needs leveling which I shall attempt doing in my new Katsu (approx $60 mini drill press with my freshly zero raked drill set.. It is cheap but has no runout so has some potential use. I have modified this drill press by replacing a pulley and belt on top of the drill spindle with a larger diameter one to give a slow enough speed. Even though this drill has a variable speed control I found with the pulley it came with it was too fast at is slowest constant speed.

    Kindest Regards

    Christopher

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  2. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2011
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    Well as has been discussed in a few recent posts now, for a solid plug like that which you show, I would use a bulls foot file to smooth the surfaces once installed. Or you can use the hole in the feeler gauge method that Jerry mentioned.

    Now that you have the original hole plugged did you plan out how to find the original centre?

    David
     
  3. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User

    Dec 9, 2017
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    Hi David, this is not the original hole but a spare old clock plate. However your right so my solution was to use marks giving the original center, another solution would obviously be a simple template. I would be more inclined to find a rotary bur type of device if possible for flat surfaces if there is such a thing. I have now several de-burring tools but only for ragged edges on a fresh hole. Any ideas on best policy removing scratches?

    Kindest Regards
    Christopher
     
  4. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User

    Dec 9, 2017
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    Thanks Guys found on previous post hand / rotary grinder this will do it and I suppose for scratches 250 grit emery?
    Christopher
     
  5. peanuts

    peanuts Registered User
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    Mar 21, 2017
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    I'd practice scratch removal on a scrap plate, if it were me. 250 grit is going to leave marks. Even 0000 steel wool leaves evidence of the direction in which you applied it.
     
  6. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User

    Dec 9, 2017
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    Good to hear from you mate, yes your probably right so will practice on old plate.

    Kind Regards

    Christopher
     

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