Id. this pocket watch.

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by marc12345, Apr 24, 2011.

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  1. marc12345

    marc12345 Registered User

    Apr 24, 2011
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    #1 marc12345, Apr 24, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2011
    I can not read the inside of this watch. Does anyone know what it is.

    It has a lot of Script writing inside, that I can not make out.

    I think it says "lever". There are two holes, which I think a key goes into.


    Thanks

    Nancy o:)
     
  2. marc12345

    marc12345 Registered User

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Can any one help be ID this Pocket Watch?

    I have this watch that on the inside had a lot of information but it is in script that I can not read. "lever" I think is on the inside, couple of holes for a key, and it has a number of layers to it, which all open. It turns but will not keep time. It is also coin silver.

    Thanks o:)
    -> posts merged by system <-
    Maybe this will work this time... pics.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Re: Can any one help be ID this Pocket Watch?

    marc, I will move to the European Pocket Watch forum on a hunch. It may, however, turn out to be American and be moved once again. I suspect that pictures of what lies beneath the "layers" would be welcome to the pocket watch experts.
     
  4. Kent

    Kent Registered User
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    Hi Nancy:

    For us to be able to tell (guess?) at what your watch is, we would need to see pictures of the movement and the markings inside of the case. You can ignore any "hand-scratched" characters, they're watch repairers' marks.

    To post an image, scroll to the top of the thread and click on "FAQ," then scroll down to "vBulletin FAQ" and click on the "How to post images." Once in the "How to post images" box, go about halfway down to the statement "There are two ways to attach images while editing a post on the message board." and follow the instructions there. Note that there is no indication of attaching a file (picture) until you go to actually post your thread or your reply. The picture does not show up in the "Instant Reply" text box in which you've written your thread or your reply, nor does the picture appear in the "Preview." Once you see an indication in the "Manage Attachments" box that your files were uploaded, be sure to submit the post from which you opened the "Manage Attachments" box. If you don't, your files will not really be uploaded. You can test your efforts in the Just Practicing and Learning Forum. If you have a problem getting the picture(s) to load, check your file size and make sure that it is less than 500Kb. If it is, it should load to be posted. Too large of a file size is probably the most common problem in trying to upload a picture.

    Its also helpful if you can post all the markings that are on in case they can't be seen in the picture(s).

    Good luck,
     
  5. Cary Hurt

    Cary Hurt Registered User
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    #5 Cary Hurt, Apr 25, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2011
    Nancy,

    I have merged both of your threads into this one. The watch appears to be European to me. Your watch is apparently Swiss, or at least the case is. The use of the word "lever" on the inner cover suggests it was intended for the English market. I would venture that the other words are other references to technical details, and then possibly the names of the maker or retailer, and their location.

    Since you are apparently using a scanner, it may be difficult for you to get pictures of the movement and the inscriptions. If you can copy the inscriptions letter by letter, we can probably tell you their importance, and they may give clues to the origin.
     
  6. marc12345

    marc12345 Registered User

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Hi. I am having problems getting the pictures right, but here is what I have in the pics so far.

    And what it says inside....

    On the back cover inside in says "warranted coin silver", then there is a clear number 40106, with a single 3 below that number.. Then there are numbers which look like hand scribed, not as the other number which I would guess was stamed, and that number scribed is 1096160 the other number looking like j96,85 or 896,85. My sense of these numbers might be a person who repaire or serviced the watch over the years.. just a hunch.

    Then the next hinged cover that has two holes in it, I assum to allow the settings, say Locle in a Airle type. The other info Is very hard to read as it in script. But what I get from it is..... A. Perregau.. maybe "n" then the word Locle, then I think Patent Lever. then the next line. No. 40106.

    Both turn keys turns are square.

    That is what I have so far.
     

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  7. Cary Hurt

    Cary Hurt Registered User
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    Nancy,

    As I thought, your watch is definitely Swiss. Locle is a well-known watchmaking town in Switzerland, and the A. Perregaux (the last letter should be an "X") is the name of a well known watchmaking family. Whether they had anything to do with the manufacture of your watch remains to be seen, as it was often Swiss practice to engrave a close facsimile of a famous name on a watch, to imply that it was produced by the more-famous company.

    "Patent lever" refers to a technical detail regarding the movement, specifically that it has a lever escapement. This was a higher quality movement than the contemporary cylinder movements, and was a feature well worth touting on the cover, much like our modern cars have chrome emblems indicating the engine size, or whether it's a hybrid and so on.

    The holes are for using the key to wind the watch, and to set the hands (using the center hole).

    I expect your movement to be a standard Swiss bar type movement, but if you can open that cover, pictures of the movement might give us more clues about it's quality and date. With the information you've posted so far, I would guess the watch would date anywhere from 1860 to 1880, give or take a few years.
     
  8. marc12345

    marc12345 Registered User

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Hi. all. I think I have the insides ... here is its. o:)
    -> posts merged by system <-
    Well I want to thanks you folks for the help. It was really something to get the pictures. I must need a new camera or something. Close ups are very hard. And I had to use spot lights to get something to show up.

    So is this a rare pocket watch? Wouldn't that be nice? I love having older things about me, must be my old age, no I can not say that as even when I was younger I loved them.

    Sad when the treasures have to be turned into cash to pay taxes and such.

    So what more do you think we can come up with...

    Thanks Nancy.o:)
     

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