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I was fortunate to buy this little beauty, Your opinions on EW&C Co. and this movement will be highly appreciated.

A.F.W.

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So I read that this type of a clock is often described as Mignonette Desk Clock.
This one from Cartier but the case and movement are both signed as European Watch & Clock Co.
What was the input of Cartier? Was it the design only or was the enameling done in France as well?
From the size of the barrel I surmise it is an 8 day movement. I have been running it and it has already run 4 days.

CartierDeskClock40.jpg CartierDEskClock39.jpg CartierDeskClock38.jpg CartierDeskClock37.jpg CartierDeskClock2.JPG
 

roughbarked

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The European Watch and Clock Co, began in the 1920s as a joint venture between Cartier and Edmund Jaeger, of the Jaeger-LeCoultre firm, leaders in innovative watch movement manufacturing. Although Cartier continued to work with other movement manufacturers, many of their top-line items featured EWC movements, created within the Jaeger-LeCoultre factory in Le Sentier Switzerland. Thus I'd venture to say that Cartier are mainly the retailers. Though they may have a design component.
 
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zedric

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I agree with what roughbarked has said - to add a little, there were quite a number of these small swiss timepieces made in much the same style (guilloché enamel) with silver edging so the dial and hands are the main differences to them from the outside - many had JTC (or more correctly LTC - the monogram reads as JTC) movements, and others had movements by other makers, but they generally had a similar look

Cartier clocks often have a repeat function (not seen in this one) triggered by pressing a cabuchon jewel in the top of the case. I'm not sure how much you would have paid for this one, but the name Cartier on the dial certainly adds considerably to the value compared to the non-Cartier versions... They are usually 8 day movements.
 
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A.F.W.

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I agree with what roughbarked has said - to add a little, there were quite a number of these small swiss timepieces made in much the same style (guilloché enamel) with silver edging so the dial and hands are the main differences to them from the outside - many had JTC (or more correctly LTC - the monogram reads as JTC) movements, and others had movements by other makers, but they generally had a similar look

Cartier clocks often have a repeat function (not seen in this one) triggered by pressing a cabuchon jewel in the top of the case. I'm not sure how much you would have paid for this one, but the name Cartier on the dial certainly adds considerably to the value compared to the non-Cartier versions... They are usually 8 day movements.
Yes, those with repeat function run twice as much or more in price:) Let me say this, I did some enameling years ago in my studies. It is a very time consuming process. So when I see a superbly done enamel work I marvel. Below some of my work of years ago. enamel3panels3.jpg enamel3panels5.jpg enamel3panels4 (1).jpeg thumbs_enamel3panels1 (1).jpeg
 
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Ralph

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AFW,

I saw this French clock a few years ago and was blown away by the enamel work. It's a little over 5" or 135mm in diameter and powered by a Continental fusee watch movement.

IMG_8829.JPG IMG_8830.JPG IMG_8831.JPG
 
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A.F.W.

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May 11, 2005
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AFW,

I saw this French clock a few years ago and was blown away by the enamel work. It's a little over 5" or 135mm in diameter and powered by a Continental fusee watch movement.

View attachment 690506 View attachment 690507 View attachment 690508
Wow, very impressive. This kind of enameling was done most likely using a silk screen process. I think it had to be done separately for each color with repeated firing. I used a silk screen process once while studying at an art college. A photograph I took was applied to a silk screen and then using it the powdered enamel was applied to a blank piece which already had a white enamel fired on it. that was 47 years ago and I still have it. It is about 8" x 10". Looking at the back side you can see the counter enamel applied to the back of the dial. Looking at the mechanism of this clock which may date to late 1700s or early 1800s and the dial which required a photo process I cannot reconcile both as having been made at the same period... (?)
 

Ralph

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Looking at the mechanism of this clock which may date to late 1700s or early 1800s and the dial which required a photo process I cannot reconcile both as having been made at the same period... (?)
Hi, I have no doubt they were made at the same period. There is a late 18th century French clock in the Halim Museum, Evanston, Illinois, that has a clock with a very similar map enamel in the center of the 24 hour dial. I screen grabbed an image from a youtube video , that Mark Frank made to document the museum collection.

halimmap.jpg

Those who might be interested in reviewing the Halim museum, Mark Frank's video can be
viewed at this link.


The museum closed temporarily(?) last year for adding new displays. The last time I checked, it is still closed. It is a first rate museum.

Ralph
 
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