Help I need help with a Regula 25-79 Cuckoo Clock

POWERSTROKE

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Jan 11, 2011
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I don’t take it as a criticism. I find that the vast majority I have taken apart do not need 10 bushings. I’ve seen one so far out of about 60 movements that needed 10. Some of those probably could’ve been left in hind sight. Cuckoos generally stop when a couple bushings get slightly past questionable and or get dirty, the weights are usually weighted to just about run the clock in most situations. So when they stop, most of the time, they shouldn’t be destroyed in most cases like a spring driven movement that is generally over powered. I’ve seen a couple cuckoos that people probably kept spraying and spraying, maybe adding more weight on some 8 days that had some severe bushing wear. You could actually clean most movements and have them run for a year, but that is not recommended.
 

Rod Schaffter

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LOL. So true, Rough!

I'd like to correct my statement above. I said cuckoo's are hung from the back plate. Obviously from the front plate. Senior moment :D
A strategically placed block of wood screwed in from below to support the rear plate could fix that, if it were an issue...
 

shutterbug

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I don’t take it as a criticism. I find that the vast majority I have taken apart do not need 10 bushings. I’ve seen one so far out of about 60 movements that needed 10. Some of those probably could’ve been left in hind sight. Cuckoos generally stop when a couple bushings get slightly past questionable and or get dirty, the weights are usually weighted to just about run the clock in most situations. So when they stop, most of the time, they shouldn’t be destroyed in most cases like a spring driven movement that is generally over powered. I’ve seen a couple cuckoos that people probably kept spraying and spraying, maybe adding more weight on some 8 days that had some severe bushing wear. You could actually clean most movements and have them run for a year, but that is not recommended.
Yep. But there's always that one or two. Our OP may have had THAT one ;)
 

Jmurrell

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You're the only one with eyes on the movement, John. You have to make the call regarding what will be bushed and what doesn't need it. Your clock is running well, and that's the point of digging into it. Be happy with what you did, and enjoy the journey ;)
Thanks Shutterbug I am really happy with it but now for the ones that I couldn't get to run before. I can't decide whether to work on the woodchopper first or let it set and do the others until I get better on cuckoos.
John :rolleyes:
 

kinsler33

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It's my observation that those who aren't still learning do not post here.

In another life I earned an advanced academic degree, and my experience is that it gives me the right to ask dumber questions.
 

kinsler33

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Thanks Shutterbug I am really happy with it but now for the ones that I couldn't get to run before. I can't decide whether to work on the woodchopper first or let it set and do the others until I get better on cuckoos.
If that's the cuckoo with the two guys sawing that godawful log I'd wait. Those saw guys are driven right off the escapement, and the manufacturers did not waste any money on design or repairability. The clock needs all the extra power it can muster to keep them moving. You _have_ to test your movement when they're hooked up or you'll fool yourself like I did. Movement ran great without 'em.
 

woodlawndon

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If that's the cuckoo with the two guys sawing that godawful log I'd wait. Those saw guys are driven right off the escapement, and the manufacturers did not waste any money on design or repairability. The clock needs all the extra power it can muster to keep them moving. You _have_ to test your movement when they're hooked up or you'll fool yourself like I did. Movement ran great without 'em.
I liked one of your earlier descriptions, "wretched things". I just don't like these clocks and get no joy out of working on them. It's why I'll probably never put out a shingle for repair, these and modern Hermles that people bring in. I even find it fun to work on anniversary or basic kitchen clocks but these seem to annoy rather than please.
Don
 

POWERSTROKE

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I liked one of your earlier descriptions, "wretched things". I just don't like these clocks and get no joy out of working on them. It's why I'll probably never put out a shingle for repair, these and modern Hermles that people bring in. I even find it fun to work on anniversary or basic kitchen clocks but these seem to annoy rather than please.
Don
The Germans tend to make complex machines. I’ve owned many things German. Some simple, most not. The two things I dislike most about cuckoos are pressed on starwheels and the punches in perch clamps on the front plates. The rest is a simple puzzle. This is on the regula movements.
I’m not quite so sure why most folks prefer the regula movments over the Herrs, my hieß would be that they’ve worked on more of them. I think the Herrs have a better overall design and quality build. The perch is better, and adjustable, the strike wheel is inside the plate, it has a better feel when your winding it etc. I think if you do a bunch of them, youll feel more comfortable.
 

kinsler33

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I liked one of your earlier descriptions, "wretched things". I just don't like these clocks and get no joy out of working on them. It's why I'll probably never put out a shingle for repair, these and modern Hermles that people bring in. I even find it fun to work on anniversary or basic kitchen clocks but these seem to annoy rather than please.
That's interesting. Clock work has never been a hobby for me, but always a business (occasionally profitable.) Thus I like all clocks approximately equally because I'm doing the work for the customer. The same was true for the home audio equipment I repaired at the various incarnations of Kinsler Hi-Fi Service for many years. At times repair work was the only way I related to the rest of the world.

Yes, a Hermle chiming wall clock can be a cranky, tedious beast, but their owners love them. Same deal with your standard Hermle floating-balance retirement clock. Cuckoo clocks aren't nearly as bothersome for some reason: perhaps I've developed something of a sense of humor in that regard: I polish rusty chains in a plastic bottle tossed in the dryer and tell customers that I'm developing military regalia for the Order of the Iron Pine Cone. And weird stuff comes through: a barometer, a gloriously hideous silver Ronson table cigarette lighter, and today an Italian music box. It's fun, and I don't have to be married to the stuff: the customer comes and takes it home and then something new and equally weird, or not so weird but with an interesting story takes its place.
 

MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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So that wire is so bent and out of place, I didn't recognize it for what it was. It does belong but needs reshaped or replaced so that it can swing correctly. It will look like this: View attachment 591941
In looking at the picture, the leader is touching the end of the crutch loop. In any movement the leader cannot touch either the front of rear of the slot. That by itself will stop a clock
 

Jmurrell

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In looking at the picture, the leader is touching the end of the crutch loop. In any movement the leader cannot touch either the front of rear of the slot. That by itself will stop a clock
Mark I agree with you on this and I have fixed that problem and currently have the clock running fine with 275 gram wts.

Since I did this one and got it fixed I decided to work on my woodchopper cuckoo and I managed to get it running fine but it requires a 320 gram wt own the time train.

However the other two trains are functioning great with only 8oz wts.

Thanks for all the input from everyone :):clap:

John Murrell
 

kinsler33

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I fooled with a woodchopper clock for about a month, and I wouldn't be at all surprised if it shows up here again. If it does I'll figure out a way to add nice brass bushings to those saw guys, because it has to be the friction in their shoulder joints that soaks up so much time-train energy.

Mark Kinsler
 

POWERSTROKE

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I fooled with a woodchopper clock for about a month, and I wouldn't be at all surprised if it shows up here again. If it does I'll figure out a way to add nice brass bushings to those saw guys, because it has to be the friction in their shoulder joints that soaks up so much time-train energy.

Mark Kinsler
The wire has to be centered pretty perfectly and you dan open the loop up on the wood cutters if it’s too tight to reduce the overall contact a little bit. Without the movement touching the loop it should move very easily, as light as a feather. I wouldn’t bush their arms.
 

kinsler33

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That didn't entirely suffice, for the plastic figures seem to wear out, making the pivot points somewhat sloppy. The wires running through them get rusty as well.

Mark Kinsler

And I could tell by their expressions that they didn't like me.
 
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Ale2020

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Jun 27, 2020
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Hola!,el problema me parece esta en la biela donde cuelga el péndulo que se vé en la segunda foto, tiene ese alambre retorcido que es muy muy largo (calculo por las fotos unos 2 centimetros de más), fijáte también que en la tercer foto se ve el péndulo bajísimo a punto tal que se llega a ver el gancho de colgar que normalmente queda oculto, un pendulo tan largo resulta un obstáculo imposible a la máquina y por eso anda con mayor peso, Saludos desde Ciudad de La Plata Argentina!!!
Rough translation added by shutterbug:
Hello! The problem seems to me to be in the connecting rod where the pendulum that is seen in the second photo hangs, it has that twisted wire that is very very long (I calculate from the photos about 2 centimeters more), also note that in the third photo the pendulum is seen very low to such a point that you can see the hanging hook that is normally hidden, such a long pendulum is an impossible obstacle to the machine and therefore it is carrying more weight, Greetings from Ciudad de La Plata Argentina! !!
 
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Robert Horneman

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You're the only one with eyes on the movement, John. You have to make the call regarding what will be bushed and what doesn't need it. Your clock is running well, and that's the point of digging into it. Be happy with what you did, and enjoy the journey ;)
Just like John cuckoos are a pain in the butt. Unlike John I love them. Regulas are easy and simple. Three weight musicals and quails are a different breed of cat. I find them very difficult and frustrating but I love to work on them!
 

POWERSTROKE

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Just like John cuckoos are a pain in the butt. Unlike John I love them. Regulas are easy and simple. Three weight musicals and quails are a different breed of cat. I find them very difficult and frustrating but I love to work on them!
I don’t find cuckoos difficult at all unless someone else with fat fingers touched them before me. I actually like the Hubert Herrs the best. Smooth winding feel, less springs.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff