• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

I need help identifying my very heavy 22 inch clock

donandnickie

Registered User
Jan 19, 2021
6
2
3
48
Country
Hi everyone, I am new here, and am hoping someone out there can give me some information about this clock. Thank you so much.
IMG_7303.jpg IMG_7312.jpg IMG_7310.jpg IMG_7312.jpg IMG_7305.jpg IMG_7316.jpg IMG_7316.jpg IMG_7304.jpg IMG_7307.jpg IMG_7303.jpg IMG_7306.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: jmclaugh

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,658
1,059
113
Country

zedric

NAWCC Member
Aug 8, 2012
1,442
236
63
Country
Region
Its French, probably mid to late 19th century, and a cartel clock. It is possible that there will be a foundry mark on the case, which might tell you who made the case, but the movement looks to be unmarked.
 
  • Like
Reactions: donandnickie

donandnickie

Registered User
Jan 19, 2021
6
2
3
48
Country
Its French, probably mid to late 19th century, and a cartel clock. It is possible that there will be a foundry mark on the case, which might tell you who made the case, but the movement looks to be unmarked.
Thank you! I cant seem to find any markings on the case.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,658
1,059
113
Country
Thank you! I cant seem to find any markings on the case.
Yes, the movement looks French, as does the case which appears to be of decent quality. Brass? Gilt bronze?

This style of French clock, as were other styles of earlier periods, where repeatedly "revived" through the 19th well in to the 20th century. Very true of French furniture, too. Some were of rather high quality, though in general the quality does decline through the 19th into the 20th century.

Cartel clocks were made in other countries. Previously, I posted a genuine 18th Century Swedish cartel clock by Nils Berg, a master clock maker from Stockholm. See this thread:

Nils Berg vaggpendul | NAWCC Forums

Here's a teaser pic:

nils berg 3.JPG nils berg 4.JPG

The second picture gives you some ideal of its size. It's next to a rather large American wall regulator by William Edwin Hadlock.

The case of the Berg clock is carved wood which is covered in gesso then gold leaf. It is carved in the ornate rococo style. I believe that the clock was produced in about the middle of the 18th century. In a few years, with the ascent of Gustav III to the Swedish throne, a much more austere neoclassical style, called "Gustavian", would supersede the rococo. Gustav was inspired by the furnishings in the latest style he saw in France. Very different different looking furniture, including cartel clocks, was produced.

The surface is completely original and survives beautifully and shows its age wonderfully. No need to restore or modify as some would advocate.

Enjoy your clock.

RM
 
  • Like
Reactions: donandnickie

howtorepairpendulumclocks

Registered User
Dec 18, 2020
269
77
28
53
Country
Yes. Mid-late 19th C copy of and eighteenth century cartel clock. All very nice. Not bronze. pendulum de Paris movement. good quality. Agree, washing only, no re-finishing required.
 
  • Like
Reactions: T.Cu

514 Poplar Street
Columbia, PA 17512

Phone: 717-684-8261

Contact the Webmaster for perceived copyright infringement (DMCA Registration Number 1010287).

Copyright © National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc (A 501c3 non-profit corporation). All Rights Reserved.

The NAWCC is dedicated to providing association services, promoting interest in and encouraging the collecting of clocks and watches including disseminating knowledge of the same.