19th c I might be getting a Prentiss Clock & Improvement Co. Wall Clock

captainclock

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Hello everyone, I should be getting my French Clock today, and the same guy that I got the French clock from is now possibly offering me a late 19th Century Prentiss Clock & Improvement Co. Wall clock that looks like the ones you would of seen in banks and train stations in the late 19th century.

Any information about this clock would be appreciated, see picture below.

79972_070611_390000000.jpg
 

captainclock

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OK, for some reason or another I cannot figure out how to edit my initial posting, so I'm just going to update my posting this way:

This is actually a Gallery Clock, I couldn't think of the correct term for this style of clock when I was making this posting initially.

And This clock should of had the classification of 20th Century not 19th Century, because it seems that Prentiss Clock Co. Became Prentiss Clock and Improvement Co. in 1897 which means that this clock is more than likely from the early 20th century between 1900 and 1930.
 

captainclock

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Is it an electric slave clock or a regular spring driven clock?
According to the guy who owns the clock, it's a 60 day spring driven wall clock that he had gotten from his great-uncle who worked for New York Central Railroad, and the clock originally came from an old train station that belonged to New York New York Central Railroad in Upstate New York, and his great uncle got the clock when New York Central Railroad closed up shop in the 1960s.

And when he initially messaged me about the clock, and sent me a photo of the clock, I thought he was showing me another clock he was going to try and sell me, but it turned out he was just sharing with me a clock that he had that he would never dream of selling because of the family history tied to it, because he knew I was fascinated by clocks and their history and because he liked the family history behind my Seth Thomas Column and Cornice Clock when I posted about it on the Antique Fan Collectors Association forum, which is how I know this guy.

Anyways I'm sorry for any mix up this thread may have caused. I was mostly interested in knowing about the history of the Prentiss company because my friend asked me to look it up on here or ask about it on here. Also, he told me that the aforementioned clock was repaired by one of the members here that lives in Oregon named Jeff Major and I was hoping to see if he would of seen this thread and could of told me anything about this clock and history, including the history of the company who made it.

Anyways, sorry for the long ramble.

Thanks,

Levi
 

Andy Dervan

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It would be helpful to see a better photograph of the dial to actually read how it was signed and some good movement photographs.

It is surprising to read it supposedly runs 60 days. Most longer running clocks (more than 7 days) have two winding arbors - Seth Thomas made a movement that ran two weeks with 2 winding arbors.

Is the clock running?

Did he provide you any details and documentation supporting his story about the clock's history?

Andy Dervan
 

captainclock

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Mar 4, 2013
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It would be helpful to see a better photograph of the dial to actually read how it was signed and some good movement photographs.

It is surprising to read it supposedly runs 60 days. Most longer running clocks (more than 7 days) have two winding arbors - Seth Thomas made a movement that ran two weeks with 2 winding arbors.

Is the clock running?

Did he provide you any details and documentation supporting his story about the clock's history?

Andy Dervan
That's the only picture of the clock he sent me, and yes it does currently run according to what he told me.

As for documentation to support the history of the clock, he just said that all he had was what his great-uncle told him about the clock along with what the previous person who worked on the clock for him confirmed for him about the clock's history, which like I said in my previous post was Jeff Major up in Oregon who is a member here (and I know I've seen him here fairly recently, replying to posts), he might be able to shed some light on how this clock is able to be a 60 day movement and only have one winding arbor, because to be honest I'm not sure how they did it either except maybe they did the same thing that Westclox did on some of their alarm clocks including some of their later Big Ben and Baby Ben alarms, and that is having 2 springs being wound by a single key/winding arbor, which if that's the case then they more than likely used 2 30 day mainsprings next to each other with a single winding arbor mechanism in between them that wound up the two mainsprings together which then in turn ran the clock for a total of 60 days. But that's just a guess of how Prentiss did it, without looking at their patent information.
 

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