I love it.....but what is it?

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Lincolnhill, Nov 27, 2017.

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  1. Lincolnhill

    Lincolnhill Registered User
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    Jan 5, 2002
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    A2E71DC3-8C9F-49B3-9942-2661F8C52C9F.jpeg 593BEBBA-BEB8-4064-A79A-2FECE036B376.jpeg 9B213B4A-E906-4E04-88C3-EC2C1C911BB6.jpeg F2A68737-6B37-40C1-BCBF-27CB123F6A0E.jpeg As someone who has collected clocks for more than 25 years, I am now more excited by the unusual than I am by the rare. While I still dream of coming across an early Simon Willard banjo or an untouched American precision regulator, I really love coming across a clock that I have never seen or read about before.

    Attached are some photos of a recent acquisition. The dial is original and in fantastic condition. The 60-beat movement hasn’t been touched in years and appears in good order other than a missing crutch. The numerous hands are missing but thankfully I have a friend who can make appropriate replacements. The case that came with the clock looks like an English tavern clock and is in horrible, probably not restorable, condition.

    I haven’t had enough time to count the four various time trains, but at first glance, they all appear similar.

    So.....the question of the day.....what is this? I can understand the need to track several time zones simultaneously, but what would the two night/day dials be at the bottom of the dial? All dials are geared to have a minute and hour hand.

    I look forward to restoring the movement over the Christmas/New Year’s holiday and if I can get it running again, to finding/building an appropriate case to house the movement.

    I very much appreciate any and all input on what this clock may be. Thank you in advance, Michael
     
  2. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Jan 22, 2002
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    Michael, that's an interesting movement. I believe they usually call them world time clocks. The enigma of yours, are the 24 (double 12) hour dials on the bottom. It looks like they would take an hour hand, but what the inner arbor appears to do is drive a jump hour hand, sans minute hand. Why they would do that, with the AM/PM;Day/Night ?? indications are a mystery so far. Maybe someone will reveal the secret.

    Regards, Ralph
     
  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I agree. A VERY interesting movement and dial.

    To me, the dial appears to have been hand inked.

    I too believe that the dials around the perimeter of the upper 1/2 of the dial may have been intended to show the time in other cities or time zones with the central dial indicating local time. In fact, it appears that the aforementioned may have shadows above the central arbor opening of what were paper labels with a fragment of one remaining on the subsidiary dial on the viewer's right. Can you make out any writing?

    The lower dials. Day/night? Possibly. However, the amount of day and night varies over the course of the year. These dials seem to fix both at 12 hours. Yes, a bit of a mystery.

    Is it weight driven, spring or fusee? I think I see a bit of "gut" hanging out below the movement.

    I would love to see the case. I wouldn't be so fast to discard it. I could see this movement and dial fitting nicely into a tavern style clock case especially if it's weight driven. So the case may be original and possibly restorable and would be a shame to lose. If not restorable, it may serve as a guide to a suitable replacement.

    My suspicion is that this was made as a one off by a clock maker?

    Nice thing.

    RM
     
  4. P.Hageman

    P.Hageman Registered User

    Jul 20, 2014
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    Are you sure it not one of those modern drones :) Just kidding. Its a very interesting movement and I can't recall ever seen something like this.
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Gee. Looks like a "steampunk" drone?

    RM
     
  6. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    whether it's weight or spring driven... wouldn't driving five trains require significant power?
     
  7. Tim Orr

    Tim Orr National Membership Chair
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    Good evening, Michael!

    I have a related object, though mine is more of a time calculator than a multiple time zone clock. You turn the central dial to set GMT, and the time in the various cities is shown on the subsidiary dials. There's also a shot of the inside, which is quite simple.

    Best regards!

    Tim Orr
    $_57.JPG $_57-9.JPG TimeCalcInside.jpg

    View attachment 404612
     
  8. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Tim,

    I would call your's a world Time Clock as well. Why do you call it a calculator? Aren't the hands when installed, just set to the proper displacement from GMT for the various cities.

    Ralph
     
  9. Lincolnhill

    Lincolnhill Registered User
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    Good evening All,

    Thank you for the feedback. I have already learned some things. I hadn’t looked closely, but now see and understand the jump hour mechanism for the two lower dials. Very interesting, and equally perplexing. I hope to be able to restore the movement soon at which point I can determine the various tooth counts on the gear trains to see if they are all the same (I imagine they are) or if there is something unique about the various dials.

    Regarding the movement’s power source, it is indeed weight driven. I have not had the time to pull the case out of the garage, but will try to do so this weekend to see if it is large enough to accommodate a second’s beating pendulum. The case is truly in horrible condition so it would be a labor of love to try and resurrect it. That said, if I can determine that it is original, I cannot think of a better use of my time than to try and bring it back to life.

    I look forward to any other thoughts and will update the message board as progress is slowly but surely made.

    Michael
     
  10. Tim Orr

    Tim Orr National Membership Chair
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    Good evening, Ralph!

    I suppose you could call it a World Time Clock if you wanted to. The thing it does not do is keep time. Like the proverbial stopped clock, it is correct only twice a day. There's no timekeeping mechanism. The hands show displacement from GMT, and display whatever time it would be at whatever the GMT dial is set to. To me, that makes it more of a "calculator" than a "clock."

    Best regards!

    Tim
     
  11. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Ah, I erred in thinking that was the dial from a clock.

    Ralph
     
  12. rfh11

    rfh11 Registered User
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    I was also interested in this clock, but sadly was not the high bidder. The problem that I saw with the case was the dial was too small for the opening. I did see some veneer damage but repairable. My intent was to make a new dial surround and repair the veneer. Unlike you I didn't have the case in hand. My thoughts on the two lower dials was possibly to indicate high and low tide. Good luck with a very unique clock.

    Randy
     

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