Huygens’ Legacy – The Golden Age of the Pendulum Clock

Discussion in 'Horological Books' started by Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, Sep 23, 2004.

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  1. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
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    Huygens’ Legacy – The Golden Age of the Pendulum Clock

    I just returned from Holland where I had a chance to view the temporary exhibit at the Palace Het Loo in Appeldorn on the very early pendulum clocks. (Produced by the Antiquarian Horological Society Dutch section) There is no question in my mind that this is the most significant horological exhibit ever staged. (It is open till November 28, 2004, info at their website www.clockexhibition.nl , which also is well done).

    Up to now I considered the best temporary exhibit ever to be the “Horological Masterworks” show produced 2003 in Oxford (later also in Liverpool) by the AHS. (This too had a wonderful booksize published catalog, which sold out during the exhibit and now is a sought out collectors item).

    Not coincidentally about 30 of the clocks exhibited at Oxford(or about half of the Oxford show) form the backbone of the Appeldorn show. But in Oxford they were shown as individual highlights, gorgeous early and important clocks by makers such as Knibb, Fromanteel, Thompion etc. In Appeldorn they are part of coherent story line about the invention and early developments of the pendulum clock as a similar number of continental (Dutch and French) 17th century pendulum clocks by Coster, Osterwijck, Lachez, Pascal, Saude, Hanet, Thuret, van Ceulen, Leeuwarden etc have been added, and the logical endpoint and highpoint of the early pendulum clock development has been added as the last piece of the show (and the story): The famous Thompion Mostyn Clock has been lent by the British Museum for the show.

    A absolutly fantastic catalog has been produced, where EVERY piece exhibited it described in detail and photographed both case AND movement. The 320 page catalog was not ready last week, but I saw the page proofs when I had dinner at the home of the creator of the exhibit. I predict that this catalog will sell out too, it is gorgeous, it is Euro 60 at the show and Euro 75 in the trade. It can be ordered by e-mail through ahsnl@hccnet.nl. It is a must have in any serious horological library.
     
  2. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
    1,487
    49
    48
    Male
    Horological Bibliographer -
    Sussex New Jersey USA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Huygens’ Legacy – The Golden Age of the Pendulum Clock

    I just returned from Holland where I had a chance to view the temporary exhibit at the Palace Het Loo in Appeldorn on the very early pendulum clocks. (Produced by the Antiquarian Horological Society Dutch section) There is no question in my mind that this is the most significant horological exhibit ever staged. (It is open till November 28, 2004, info at their website www.clockexhibition.nl , which also is well done).

    Up to now I considered the best temporary exhibit ever to be the “Horological Masterworks” show produced 2003 in Oxford (later also in Liverpool) by the AHS. (This too had a wonderful booksize published catalog, which sold out during the exhibit and now is a sought out collectors item).

    Not coincidentally about 30 of the clocks exhibited at Oxford(or about half of the Oxford show) form the backbone of the Appeldorn show. But in Oxford they were shown as individual highlights, gorgeous early and important clocks by makers such as Knibb, Fromanteel, Thompion etc. In Appeldorn they are part of coherent story line about the invention and early developments of the pendulum clock as a similar number of continental (Dutch and French) 17th century pendulum clocks by Coster, Osterwijck, Lachez, Pascal, Saude, Hanet, Thuret, van Ceulen, Leeuwarden etc have been added, and the logical endpoint and highpoint of the early pendulum clock development has been added as the last piece of the show (and the story): The famous Thompion Mostyn Clock has been lent by the British Museum for the show.

    A absolutly fantastic catalog has been produced, where EVERY piece exhibited it described in detail and photographed both case AND movement. The 320 page catalog was not ready last week, but I saw the page proofs when I had dinner at the home of the creator of the exhibit. I predict that this catalog will sell out too, it is gorgeous, it is Euro 60 at the show and Euro 75 in the trade. It can be ordered by e-mail through ahsnl@hccnet.nl. It is a must have in any serious horological library.
     
  3. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
    1,487
    49
    48
    Male
    Horological Bibliographer -
    Sussex New Jersey USA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I just got my copy of the book

    HUYGENS LEGACY

    the massive book describing the current temporary exhibit on the first 50 yeaqrs of the pendulum clock (till November 29) in Appeldoorn Holland.

    This is one of the most gorgeously produced horological books I have ever seen, plus highly important historical information.

    Available from the Dutch section of the AHS

    http://www.fed-klokkenvrienden.org/ahs.htm

    for approximatly EUros 90 plus shipping.

    The exhibit is described at www.clockexhibition.nl

    Fortunat
     

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