Hunter finds his prey

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by gleber, Jul 13, 2019.

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  1. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    #1 gleber, Jul 13, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
    A while back I bought a French figural clock with a hunter and his dog. Unfortunately, the bird or rabbit he was holding was missing.

    Statue Clock or Figurine Clock? Either way I found another and another.

    I finally got around to making a replacement. I'm still working on the movement, so the dial is empty, but I think the hunter and his dog are much happier now that he is successful once again.

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    Love clocks likes this.
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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  3. PatH

    PatH National Program Chair
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    Can you tell us a little about how you made the bird? I know you have great carving skills, so just wondered if it's carved and gilded. Thanks for sharing your work with us!
     
  4. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Thanks for the kind words about my carvings.

    Sure... It was a piece of mahogany scrap. I carved it using straight blades (like Xacto) and small diamond burrs in a hand grinder (like Dremel). To start, I sketched the top and side profiles on a small block and roughed it down to those in each direction. I let one wing droop a little more so it would look more natural. Then, I added details like removing wood under the wings, shaping the breast/legs and the claws. I didn't have a model, I've carved birds and guess I'm just good at visualizing things in 3D. On the body, I used a fairly coarse burr to simulate the finer feathers.

    I finished the feather carving and details on the bill and eyes using a pencil soldering iron with a tip filed into a tiny angled chisel point. If you use a blade, it will cut then heal. The hot iron burns away to create a groove. You can try to cut a V, but it's hard to keep the edges parallel. I haven't worked with gouges, but I am planning to get a set someday. For the feathers, I tilt the iron so the overlapping feather has a sharp drop and burn more on the underlying feathers so they appear to slip underneath.

    I had to cut away the areas where the hunter's fingers go. I did that by trial fitting and working a little at a time until it almost sat in his hand on its own. I did glue it though.

    When the carving was finished, I used Gold Leaf Rub'n Buff. It covers wood pretty well. I had already used that on the whole statue, so it made sense.

    I would like to see what was originally there and be able to inspect the details. For some reason, I think a rabbit would look better. Hmmm...

    Tom
     
  5. PatH

    PatH National Program Chair
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    Thank you! I think being able to visualize in 3-D (along with a steady hand) is key.
     

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