Hubert Sarton

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by carloclock, Feb 27, 2018.

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  1. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    Beautiful Liguria -Italy
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    Hallo All.
    I'm looking for some information on the clock "Pendule de Compagnie" built by Hubert Sarton and which has a dial pivoted on an axle and turns to and fro by 180°.

    I found some information ad pictures on excellent books by Royer-Collard's "Skeleton Clocks" and Derek Roberts "Continental and American Skeleton Clocks" but they are not exhaustive to understand how the motion of the dial is achieved.

    I purchased the book by Jaques Neve " Les Pendules d'Hubert Sarton" and even if there are detailed accounts on all the clocks of this maker I didn't find nothing to solve the mystery that torments me.

    Has someone detailed information on this clock or at least detailed pictures of the mechanism which gives the motion to the dial

    Thank you very much for your consideration.

    Carlo
     
  2. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    incidentally...this is the clock

    384237-feacaf79d5d453731d36bca267cba786.jpg

    Al the best.
    Carlo
     

    Attached Files:

  3. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
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    What an unusual clock!
    There are two drive springs it seems. So what are the little weights for? A Remontoire? Is it a Huygens endless loop with a drive weight & a tension weight?
    Does the face oscillate under power or is just that a person can position it as they wish?
     
  4. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    Hi tok tokkie,
    thank you very much for your interest in my posting.

    The description made by Royer-Collard (F. B.) in his excellent book Skeleton clock is a lot better of the one I might write.

    Complex clocks in the skeleton formula became so fantastic they must have surprised even the clockmakers. As most are not identified by their makers' name, the antiquarian horologist is often, as with a painting, left to decide whether a specific piece of workmanship should be attributed to a definite maker because it shows something of his flair or style. Frequently the written reference to a complicated clock is brief. Such a description may be see on page 335 in Baillie's Clocks and Watches, an historical biography (see lot 228). Under the reference circa 1790 Sarton, Hubert he writes "A clock was made for the Duke of Lorraine with a dial which moves once a minute through one hundred and eighty degrees about a vertical axis and then back, so as to show the time in all directions in a room". I found a copy of the booklet in the Ilbert Library at the British Horological Institute in London. (See catalogue illustration).

    The 'booklet' was published (probably in miniscule numbers) in 1789 by Hubert Sarton and is an exhibition catalogue describing some of his best clocks for sale, his curious inventions : une nouvelle Machine á extraire la Houille et d'une reconstruction de la fameuse Machine de Marly. The description of the clock leaves no room for doubt that the present clock is either the one made for the Duc de Lorraine in 1773, or an identical timepiece which he made for himself la pareille se trouve encore actuellement chez l'auteur.

    The clock's 'swing-head' assembly is probably unique - Sarton was obviously one of life's lateral thinkers, blessed with a clever, inventive mind that worked on a level that only natural intellects and geniuses can appreciate. His other well known skeleton clocks are further testament to his ingenuity, particularly his world time skeleton clocks that are avidly collected today.
    Sarton was not afraid of stepping away from mainstream horological design, his world time and astronomical skeleton clocks had a peculiar triangular formation. The present clock is totally unique, more akin to a standing figure with arms outstretched. There are no fewer than 722 parts to the movement of this monumental clock and every part and screw is marked in a unique manner and fits only into one spot to which it has been allocated - no production-line mechanics for this clock.

    One can only speculate that the reason for the swinging dial was to enable to Duke to read the time from different positions within a room. Sarton's interpretation of the Duke's imagination resulted in a unique clock of great complexity and instantly recognisable features. It is brilliant and iconic example of 18th century clockmaking. A clock which has piqued the imagination of keen skeleton clock collectors for many years and who until now, have only been able to imagine what it may be like to own such a magnificent clock.


    I would like to build a replica of just the portion of the clock re. the train of the time and the one to obtain the dial to swing, but just watching the pictures I was not able to investigate how this motion happens.

    This is another clock made by Hubert Sarton: it looks like to be simpler that the one of the pictures of my first posting but here too is quite impossible to understand how all the wheels work.

    384544-287f7f5e3ad1acb466658039c6d952fd.jpg

    Reading Dereck Roberts's "American e Continental Skeleton Cloks" it looks like the the clock is own by a Mr A. Odmark. Does anyone know him?

    Warmest Regards.
    Carlo
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Phil Burman

    Phil Burman Registered User

    Mar 8, 2014
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    The Albert Odmark collection, which included the clock of interest, was sold at Christies auction in 2005. The clock sold for GBP114,000 , LOT 375.

    Christie's

    Phil
     
  6. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    Thanks for the information...so no hope to get in any way some pictures :(

    Warmest regards.
    Carlo
     
  7. Phil Burman

    Phil Burman Registered User

    Mar 8, 2014
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    You could email Christie's to see if they will tell you who bought it. The worst they can do is say no.

    Phil
     
  8. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    I'll try.....:p

    Best. carlo
     

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