• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Huber 4-glass

etmb61

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I usually don't find clocks in this condition in my price range so I had to grab it. I need to find the right hands for it.

front.jpg front2.jpg dial.jpg plate.jpg b9.jpg b3.jpg p1.jpg p2.jpg

Eric
 
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KurtinSA

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Looks nice and clean! Nice find! What would the hands look like? I have four Hubers but they all have different hands...none with a dial like that, though.

Kurt
 

Harry Hopkins

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Nice find! I really like the clock and I think it is a bit unusual that each pillar in the pendulum gallery has a set screw to hold it both top and bottom. I am trying to increase my knowledge of these more unusual clocks so I have been studying your pictures. Question.. According to the Repair guide this looks to be back plate 1471 which says Jahresuhrenfabrik. How do you associate this clock with being a Huber? Also it appears to use pendulum 21 which also mentions the same manufacturer. To me some of the differences between manufacturers vs. marketers is a little muddled. Is this a case of that?
 

etmb61

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Harry,

Identification of plate 1471 as Huber comes down to who owned the patent rights and when the clocks were produced. Several plate 1471 clocks have been discovered with markings by American jewelers and dates during the time when Huber owned the international monopoly on 400 day clocks. It is believed the "Patent Applied" reference is for DRP No 144688 and USP No 751686 which are for Huber's twin loop compensating pendulum. Pendulum 21 is primarily found on clocks made during the Huber monopoly.

John Hubby has posted about the positions of the click screws and how they relate to who made the plates.

Eric
 
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MUN CHOR-WENG

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[QUhttps://mb.nawcc.org/threads/who-is-f-zacher.109571/OTE="Harry Hopkins, post: 1197155, member: 38648"]Nice find! I really like the clock and I think it is a bit unusual that each pillar in the pendulum gallery has a set screw to hold it both top and bottom. I am trying to increase my knowledge of these more unusual clocks so I have been studying your pictures. Question.. According to the Repair guide this looks to be back plate 1471 which says Jahresuhrenfabrik. How do you associate this clock with being a Huber? [/QUOTE]

Harry Hopkins,
If you click on the link below you will find information showing that Jahresuhrenfabrik had made 400-day clock in 1901 with back plate similar to Plate 1471.

Who is F. Zacher?

There have been other discussions on this message board that touched on the origin of the ratchet click spring positioning hole that was first documented in a Jahresuhrenfabrik 400-day clock back plate made in 1890. This click positioning hole is found in Plate 1471. The link below contains information on the latest discussion on this topic.

Early Juf with untypic pendulum

Mun C W
 

etmb61

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Here is the clock with replacement hands, Timesavers #33610. Not an exact match for the original hands but much better than what I found it with. At least they're the correct style. I had to modify the arbor end of the minute hand and make some bushings to get it all together. I'll need to re-blue them at some point.

new hands.jpg bushings.jpg

The old hands were cut down and soldered back together. The earlier "repair" person also crimped the minute pipe to fit the square bushing in the hand, and lost the tension washer. What a mess.

old hands.jpg

Eric
 
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etmb61

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Here's some more info to tie this clock to Huber:

DRGM 211025 DUZNov1903.jpg

Utility model registrations
(The date indicates the beginning of the protection)...
... 211025. Clock with removable protective housing, consisting of a metal frame with glass inserts. Josef Huber, Munich, Veterinärstraße 5. 14th October 1903. - H. 22 234.
(DUZ 15 Nov 1903)

Eric
 

etmb61

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So there's a Josef and an Andreas Huber? Both involved in clocks?

Kurt
Josef was Andreas' (second) son who took over management of the business in the 1890s. It was Josef who purchased the Harder patents from de Gruyter.

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Don't think I've heard of his sons. In the TT Vol X Issue 4, it doesn't seem to be that convinced that Andreas bought the patents. It says "Huber is known to have...", and "there is no concrete evidence" that he did buy the rights. He dominated the 400-Day market in the late 1890s...is it because of his dominance that people assume he had the rights to produce the clocks?

In TT Vol VIII Issue 3, Joseph is mentioned and the company went to him in around 1880. So something of a disconnect in those two articles...I had always been of the impression that it was Andreas who was behind the explosion of 400-Day clocks.

Kurt
 

etmb61

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Don't think I've heard of his sons. In the TT Vol X Issue 4, it doesn't seem to be that convinced that Andreas bought the patents. It says "Huber is known to have...", and "there is no concrete evidence" that he did buy the rights. He dominated the 400-Day market in the late 1890s...is it because of his dominance that people assume he had the rights to produce the clocks?

In TT Vol VIII Issue 3, Joseph is mentioned and the company went to him in around 1880. So something of a disconnect in those two articles...I had always been of the impression that it was Andreas who was behind the explosion of 400-Day clocks.

Kurt
Kurt,

Here is a translation (Google) of the part of the introduction to the Huber 150th anniversary catalog written by Martin Huber in 2006:

"This year Huber celebrates its 150th anniversary. Four generations of Huber have always felt committed to watchmaking and progress in the field of timekeeping. My great-grandfather, the solid craftsman from down-to-earth, Bavarian Swabia, together with his capable wife, the business has become the first address in Munich for the good bourgeoisie and the nobility. My grandfather Joseph, the son of Andreas Huber, takes over the management in 1880. For him, the visionary entrepreneur, the business at Karlsplatz is too small. He leaves it to his older brother Andreas and opens in 1888 the core business Residenzstraße 11. He filialisiert - Munich had become too tight - to Berlin, Nuremberg and Dusseldorf. He buys patents such as the annual clock, sets up production and exports the watches in large numbers all over the world. When my grandfather dies in 1920 at the age of 57, he leaves my 28-year-old father Andreas with a large trading company with seven branches that are on shaky ground. My father needs to consolidate. He brings the company through inflation with great difficulty and keeps three stores in the best locations of Berlin and the core business Residenzstraße 11, as well as the 1914 opened Neuhauser Street 2 in Munich."

Unfortunately all of Huber's workshops and records were destroyed during WWII. Unless there is some yet to be discovered document somewhere, this verbal history from the descendent owner is the best there is. The evidence I've found seems to show Huber had such a monopoly selling 400 day clocks. What doesn't wash for me is that Huber actually made the clocks.

Now de Gruyter did buy Harder's patents, and he was a (silent) partner to JUF, but he was a marine engineer, not a clockmaker. Shortly after acquiring the patents he was awarded two other patents for improvements to lifeboat davits base upon the adjustment mechanism of Harder's disk pendulum. Interesting coincidence. Shortly afterward he sold the Harder patents to Huber.

Andreas Huber had at least 3 sons, Andreas (Andrew), Joseph (Josef), and Mathias, all were in the watchmaking business.

My research is still in pieces and my notes are a mess.

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Eric -

Thanks...I'm not familiar with that catalog. As you say, from a family member, things seems to make more sense. Seems like someone should gather all that has been discussed in various places about Andreas Huber (the elder), incorporate the family writings you mention, and try to flesh out a bit more of the story. That's why I mention the Torsion Times writings which were in the 2003-2005 timeframe which predate the 2006 catalog you have. So more information might have come to light.

Kurt
 

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