Howard tower clock advice please.

Michael Gorham

Registered User
Nov 4, 2011
96
0
0
I am about to buy out the contents of a Master watchmaker's shop who is retiring after 50 years in the business and need advice about the best way to sell this Howard tower clock, fully and expertly restored by him. It is complete and original except for the dial and hands and fully functional.

It will not be available for a few weeks and needs to be removed from its current upstairs location.

I think it may be the No. 31 but I'm not an expert.

hubertclock (1).jpg

hubertclock (2).JPG

hubertclock (3).jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

User Administrator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Jan 15, 2004
23,277
1,433
113
Here and there
Country
I've moved this to the tower clock forum where I think it will do better.
 

doug sinclair

Registered User
Aug 27, 2000
14,364
62
48
Calgary, Alberta
Country
Region
If you go to FORUM TOOLS at the top of the TOWER CLOCK forum and click on it, then go to SUBSCRIBE TO FORUM and click on that, you will get updates that there has been activity on the tower clock forum.
 

gvasale

NAWCC Member
Mar 30, 2005
1,194
8
38
72
webster, Ma
Country
Region
There sould be several ways for you to sell this. Auction house, on line auction, in one of this boards "for sale" areas. Importantly, where is it?
 

Jim DuBois

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Jun 14, 2008
3,282
875
113
Magnolia, TX
Country
Region
Just to comment on "complete and original". Given it has been repainted, and incorrectly so, "complete and original" is not a valid description. May seem like splitting of hairs but it does make a big difference to some potential buyers.
 

Michael Gorham

Registered User
Nov 4, 2011
96
0
0
Thanks for your advice, gvsale, it's in the Mid-West.

Jim, you're right and I thought about that after I posted.

It's original in that no parts have been replaced but the original ones were glass blasted, some parts chromed, hand sanded until all 200 component parts were immaculate but the elegant dull green finish of the brass and the dark green of the original framework were preserved.

It was supplied by Howard in 1875 at a cost of $840 with a total cost including its bell and installation of $1239.30 and was described as being identical to the one in the New York Tribune tower.

And no, I don't think you were splitting hairs!

The whole story was featured in the Northwestern Jeweler in the 1970s.
 

Jim DuBois

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Jun 14, 2008
3,282
875
113
Magnolia, TX
Country
Region
It is a nice clock, really nice to have the gravity escapement. I am not a fan of chrome although it is better than letting shafts and other parts rust. A few E Howard clocks evidently had the various arbors nickle plated on some of the most fancy / exhibition models. A fair amount of what appears chrome on this clock would have originally been painted on most of their clocks.

I am adding the following photos just to show how some of these were done up, most of the tower clock guys are well aware of this but for what ever it is worth;

The attached E Howard factory photo is from the collection of Don Bugh and shows a later Howard in color, be it pretty muted. It does give us a better idea or what some of the clocks looked like. Others have a lot of decoration on the frames ranging from simple striping to fantastic gold leafing. Not throwing stones at your clock, I like it, it is a good find. I have a couple with repaints too and some folks prefer clean and shiny over "patina" and frequently they are so far gone as to have to be cleaned up. See photos, one is from Balzer's web site and is of the Ayers Mills clock they completely renovated...and that is 3 feet of pigeon dung the clock is sitting in....the after photo is amazing considering the original condition. The last photo is of a so called exhibition grade clock and it has nickle plated arbors IIRC. You will notice the spokes are painted red in that movement, I have had one with original black painted spokes, and have seen them with red, green, and black spokes.
 

Attachments

Michael Gorham

Registered User
Nov 4, 2011
96
0
0
Thanks for your trouble Jim - much appreciated.

My clock had been sitting in a parking lot for years luckily well greased but still exposed to the elements.

A local antique shop bought it and set it up in their shop then called in my watchmaker friend to shorten the pendulum so it could sit at ground level. Can you believe that?

Anyway, my friend bought it at that point then completely dismantled it and reassembled it.

Don't forget folks, if you have a tower clock with no hole for the pendulum, just chop the pendulum in half! :screwball:
 

gvasale

NAWCC Member
Mar 30, 2005
1,194
8
38
72
webster, Ma
Country
Region
Some "professional" people who have electrified tower clocks have done just that. Not to mention taking escapement parts among other things.
 

doug sinclair

Registered User
Aug 27, 2000
14,364
62
48
Calgary, Alberta
Country
Region
Don't forget folks, if you have a tower clock with no hole for the pendulum, just chop the pendulum in half!

There is another way! I have seen a tower clock with a counter-balanced pendulum. Sort of like a vertical foliot! The owner admitted it didn't keep very good time! It is a clock by John Payne, London, from 1837. It was in a church which was gutted by fire, and the clock was virtually destroyed. It reposed in a dumpster for many years. The decision was taken to scrap the pieces, and a lorry was called. The driver of the lorry recognized the scrap for what it was. His father was a clock restorer. John Wilding spent three years making all new gears, pinions, arbors, and other parts. The cast iron frame was all that survived the fire. The clock was in running condition 15 years ago when I saw it. But a lousy timekeeper according to the owner! If you look closely, you can see the novel way the pendulum was counter-balanced.

image.jpg
 

doug sinclair

Registered User
Aug 27, 2000
14,364
62
48
Calgary, Alberta
Country
Region
This clock was in the showroom lobby of a Jaquar auto dealer in London (Creamer). I thought the use of the word lorry was apropos. As I look at the picture, I see no evidence of cables on the wooden drums, weights, or evidence of electric motors to run the clock.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
164,890
Messages
1,434,812
Members
85,856
Latest member
nottmrd
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,872
Last edit
Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff