howard post clock data

chandler

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Sep 4, 2010
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Hello,
I have a Howard post clock movement sans pendulum and driving weight.
I know that it would be a seconds beat pendulum but do not know what
weight the bob should be nor do I know a correct weight for providing
power. The movement is 15" high with a 9" wide base. The no.3068 is
stenciled on the top plate which carries the rating screw. Hope someone
can help.
Thank you,
 

doug sinclair

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Aug 27, 2000
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This image is from a 1920s vintage Howard catalog, and may help get you started moving in the right direction. This clock is listed for use in a street clock, post clock, or a tower with up to 4 dials. No specs are given. It may or may not be your movement. But the look of the pendulum might help. No specs re: weights are listed, but experimentation should help you there.
 

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SamS

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Feb 16, 2008
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Hello,

I have a Howard this size (Howard size "0" see picture). In the attached picture you can see the weight that I was experimenting with in order to determine what it actually needed to run (gold colored weight pulled up tight under time side). Without driving any hands, the movement ran well on about 10 pounds on the time side and about 30 lbs on the strike side (Doesn't sound like your clock is a striker). The 10 lbs was pretty much the minimum and wasn't enough to "set" the maintaining spring. I have now double compounded the weights and am using about 65 lbs which allows the movement to run consistantly and while driving a very small motion works and dial (see on top of clock in picture). This is still pretty marginal and barely winds the maintaining spring, but is OK with this small motion works and running in a heated house. It gives me about 8 days of running with a 7 ft drop, and it also helps to reduce ware over time.
 

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chandler

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Sep 4, 2010
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SamS

Thanks for the reply and the photo. I now have a place to start. You are

correct when you said it was not a striker. I think that at one time it

lived in a sidewalk clock.

chandler
 

Jim DuBois

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Jun 14, 2008
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The E Howard Street Clocks on ocassion used stackable weights to insure reliability in both hot and cold weather, while not overdriving the escapement. With more modern lubrication, or indoor use only, stackable weights are not so important. I have been running my current street clock movement on a 55 pound weight, compounded 1 time. I made the weight from 4.5" steel tube and filled it with poured lead and welded a pulley bracket on the top of the weight. the pendulum is original, 6.5" dia, 2.5" thick, cast iron. The entire pendulum asembly weighs 20 pounds. The pendulum is of course a 1 second pendulum, I don't think I have ever seen one of these small movements with any other length...I attached a couple of drawings made for this movement, if that is of any help to you in making a pendulum....
 

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chandler

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Sep 4, 2010
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Jim, your reply answered all questions and then some. Thanks.

Dana C (for chandler) Armour
 

Timothy Rieman

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Feb 13, 2012
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Have you made or found a pendulum for your clock yet? I have a similar clock that is complete so I could supply information. Tim Rieman
 
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