How would you bush this removable bridge?

DannyBoy2k

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Jan 6, 2008
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Finally finished cleaning, replacing the springs, and reassembling an old German time and strike for my parents. I was playing around the with trains and, unfortunately, saw this on a removable bridge (cock?) that the star wheel pivot rides in:


IMG_2478.JPG

Both of my parents' German wall clocks have this removable bridge feature that allows you to drop the star wheel out of the train without having to split the plates so you can adjust timing. At least, I think that's what it's for. Unfortunately, it's clearly in need of some help.

Would you bush this bridge while still in the movement or take it out to bush? This would be my first bushing job and I'm approaching it with some trepidation, so just seeking out opinions.

~Dan
 

bruce linde

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absolutely remove the bridge/cock first... after moving the train backwards to help determine and mark/retain center.
 

wow

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It looks like several other bushings are sloppy and need re-bushing. I would mark all the sloppy bushings’ wear direction including that one and do a complete bushing job. That cock is so small, it would be easier to stabilize and get in a straight bushing if left in the plate,. In my opinion.
 

DannyBoy2k

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Thanks, Bruce. And, just to be clear, because it suddenly occurred to me I might not have been, I meant to take the movement apart and leave the bridge attached to the plate to bush or just bush the small bridge on its own. Thought it might be easier as far as work holding to leave it attached. The plate itself has a hole under the bridge where the star wheel arbor passes through.

~Dan
 

DannyBoy2k

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It looks like several other bushings are sloppy and need re-bushing. I would mark all the sloppy bushings’ wear direction including that one and do a complete bushing job. That cock is so small, it would be easier to stabilize and get in a straight bushing if left in the plate,. In my opinion.
Yeah, I saw that the second wheel (just down and to the left of the bridge) was a bit sloppy too. I wasn't sure if it was enough yet to warrant rebushing.

~Dan
 

bruce linde

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i'm learning that you might as well make sure everything is right when you've got 'em apart... otherwise you're just postponing the inevitable.

of course a side benefit is when you're done you know everything is good... and so does the movement! :)
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Sorry if this cuts across advice but please check depthing first before bushing. Yes a pivot moving around in a hole may or is likely to indicate bushing is required, in my experience, far too much bushing is done without checking depthing. This inevitably leads to causing problems where they didn't exist before. You don't necessarily need a depthing tool to check depthing. just place the two meshing mobiles in the Frame that are in question. Using fingers, test smoothness of transmission of power/engagement with them gently pushed apart and gently pushed together. Only bush if you can determine that bushing will improve meshing (depthing). I would say the 'pont' or bridge will t least need final broaching when out is on the plate otherwise it is really difficult to get uprighting correct. Apols again if this cuts across other advice.
 

bruce linde

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Sorry if this cuts across advice but please check depthing first before bushing. Yes a pivot moving around in a hole may or is likely to indicate bushing is required, in my experience, far too much bushing is done without checking depthing. This inevitably leads to causing problems where they didn't exist before. You don't necessarily need a depthing tool to check depthing. just place the two meshing mobiles in the Frame that are in question. Using fingers, test smoothness of transmission of power/engagement with them gently pushed apart and gently pushed together. Only bush if you can determine that bushing will improve meshing (depthing). I would say the 'pont' or bridge will t least need final broaching when out is on the plate otherwise it is really difficult to get uprighting correct. Apols again if this cuts across other advice.

yes... that would fall under 'making sure everything is right' for me.

part of checking centers is double-checking depthing.
 

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