• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

How to reshine

davtherav

Registered User
Feb 9, 2021
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Schatz 53 anniversary clock bakelite base. The outer surface has lost all of the shine, how can it be restored to the same as the inner original? 20210219_140652.jpg 20210219_140657.jpg 20210219_140907.jpg 20210219_140938.jpg
 

Thomas Sanguigni

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Aug 22, 2018
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I just finished a 400 day with a base like this. The brass is very thin and formed over the Bakelite. It can easily split. Even when done, the finished product may still have warts. I sent mine to Dan McCann


  • timeguardian427@yahoo.com
Let him give you a quote. He took the little adjuster wheels off and cleaned it all real nice. Then he lacquered the whole thing.


003.JPG 006.JPG
 
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davtherav

Registered User
Feb 9, 2021
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I just finished a 400 day with a base like this. The brass is very thin and formed over the Bakelite. It can easily split. Even when done, the finished product may still have warts. I sent mine to Dan McCann


  • timeguardian427@yahoo.com
Let him give you a quote. He took the little adjuster wheels off and cleaned it all real nice. Then he lacquered the whole thing.


View attachment 639136 View attachment 639137
I'll have to try and find a restorer in the UK. If I can get mine to your standard I'd be very pleased.
 

Thomas Sanguigni

NAWCC Member
Aug 22, 2018
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Sorry, I did not realize your were in the UK. The new forum page hides everyone's location. I get Clock Magazine. It is a UK publication. There are some dial restoration people in the classified section. I get parts back and forth on occasion from the UK. It adds about a week, but the wait would be worth it.
 
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MuseChaser

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Feb 5, 2019
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I can walk you through this. It's not hard. First, you have to strip the existing lacquer off. Pour very hot water over it and let it soak for a few minutes... hot, as in not boiling but close. You'll see spots where the lacquer starts to lift off if you rub it.. sort of like sheets of thin plastic. Then, use cotton balls and acetone or lacquer thinner. Takes a little time, but again it's not difficult and you don't need to scrub hard.. just keep applying it and use fresh cotton balls. Paper towels work fine if you're not REALLY anal about microscopic scratches that, real world, won't bother anyone. It'll look awful. Don't panic.

Next step... dissolve a few tablespoons of citric acid in a quart of hot water. Soak the base in that solution for fifteen minutes. It'll come out bright and shiny... anything that turns black is a GOOD thing.. it'll rub right off. After rubbing it and rinsing it thoroughly with clean fresh water, dry it, then polish it with Weimann's Brass polish following the directions; apply and rub it in then off until bright and shiny, then RINSE THOROUGHLY with fresh water and rub and polish again with a clean rag. At this point, you have a choice. Either wax it (automotive pure Carnuba wax works great) which results in a beautiful highly polished finish that is lighter in color than original (my preference), spray it with clear lacquer which returns it to it's original as-new state, or do nothing and let it develop an authentic patina over time. The adjuster wheels and feet benefit greatly from this, too... you can do everything other than the movement parts like this... anything originally brass and lacquered.

It's a LOT of fun to do, works great, and I've used it on a LOT of basket case 400-day clocks that come out looking beautiful. This is for the base, columns, and other non-movement parts, just to be clear. I learned the technique from another pursuit of mine; renovating and restoring vintage center draft kerosene lamps.

Edit:

Just snapped a pic for you... this is one I did about two months ago, and left alone after the hand polishing stage; no wax, no lacquer, just bare brass polished. It was in MUCH worse shape than yours when I got it. You can see, in the bottom right of the pic, another base in good but original aged condition for comparison that I have left untouched. shine.jpg
 
Last edited:
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davtherav

Registered User
Feb 9, 2021
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I can walk you through this. It's not hard. First, you have to strip the existing lacquer off. Pour very hot water over it and let it soak for a few minutes... hot, as in not boiling but close. You'll see spots where the lacquer starts to lift off if you rub it.. sort of like sheets of thin plastic. Then, use cotton balls and acetone or lacquer thinner. Takes a little time, but again it's not difficult and you don't need to scrub hard.. just keep applying it and use fresh cotton balls. Paper towels work fine if you're not REALLY anal about microscopic scratches that, real world, won't bother anyone. It'll look awful. Don't panic.

Next step... dissolve a few tablespoons of citric acid in a quart of hot water. Soak the base in that solution for fifteen minutes. It'll come out bright and shiny... anything that turns black is a GOOD thing.. it'll rub right off. After rubbing it and rinsing it thoroughly with clean fresh water, dry it, then polish it with Weimann's Brass polish following the directions; apply and rub it in then off until bright and shiny, then RINSE THOROUGHLY with fresh water and rub and polish again with a clean rag. At this point, you have a choice. Either wax it (automotive pure Carnuba wax works great) which results in a beautiful highly polished finish that is lighter in color than original (my preference), spray it with clear lacquer which returns it to it's original as-new state, or do nothing and let it develop an authentic patina over time. The adjuster wheels and feet benefit greatly from this, too... you can do everything other than the movement parts like this... anything originally brass and lacquered.

It's a LOT of fun to do, works great, and I've used it on a LOT of basket case 400-day clocks that come out looking beautiful. This is for the base, columns, and other non-movement parts, just to be clear. I learned the technique from another pursuit of mine; renovating and restoring vintage center draft kerosene lamps.

Edit:

Just snapped a pic for you... this is one I did about two months ago, and left alone after the hand polishing stage; no wax, no lacquer, just bare brass polished. It was in MUCH worse shape than yours when I got it. You can see, in the bottom right of the pic, another base in good but original aged condition for comparison that I have left untouched. View attachment 639222
Wow, that looks beautiful, thanks for sharing the renovation procedure with me, I'll look forward to following your advice.
David
 

davtherav

Registered User
Feb 9, 2021
9
1
3
72
Country
Sorry, I did not realize your were in the UK. The new forum page hides everyone's location. I get Clock Magazine. It is a UK publication. There are some dial restoration people in the classified section. I get parts back and forth on occasion from the UK. It adds about a week, but the wait would be worth it.
Thank you, I'll have to get a copy of Clock Magazine, should make interesting reading for me too!
 

JTD

Registered User
Sep 27, 2005
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The new forum page hides everyone's location
No, it doesn't. If you click on the persons name (on the left, beside their message), you will see the flag of their country. (Unless the person concerned has chosen not to state where they are).

JTD
 

davtherav

Registered User
Feb 9, 2021
9
1
3
72
Country
I can walk you through this. It's not hard. First, you have to strip the existing lacquer off. Pour very hot water over it and let it soak for a few minutes... hot, as in not boiling but close. You'll see spots where the lacquer starts to lift off if you rub it.. sort of like sheets of thin plastic. Then, use cotton balls and acetone or lacquer thinner. Takes a little time, but again it's not difficult and you don't need to scrub hard.. just keep applying it and use fresh cotton balls. Paper towels work fine if you're not REALLY anal about microscopic scratches that, real world, won't bother anyone. It'll look awful. Don't panic.

Next step... dissolve a few tablespoons of citric acid in a quart of hot water. Soak the base in that solution for fifteen minutes. It'll come out bright and shiny... anything that turns black is a GOOD thing.. it'll rub right off. After rubbing it and rinsing it thoroughly with clean fresh water, dry it, then polish it with Weimann's Brass polish following the directions; apply and rub it in then off until bright and shiny, then RINSE THOROUGHLY with fresh water and rub and polish again with a clean rag. At this point, you have a choice. Either wax it (automotive pure Carnuba wax works great) which results in a beautiful highly polished finish that is lighter in color than original (my preference), spray it with clear lacquer which returns it to it's original as-new state, or do nothing and let it develop an authentic patina over time. The adjuster wheels and feet benefit greatly from this, too... you can do everything other than the movement parts like this... anything originally brass and lacquered.

It's a LOT of fun to do, works great, and I've used it on a LOT of basket case 400-day clocks that come out looking beautiful. This is for the base, columns, and other non-movement parts, just to be clear. I learned the technique from another pursuit of mine; renovating and restoring vintage center draft kerosene lamps.

Edit:

Just snapped a pic for you... this is one I did about two months ago, and left alone after the hand polishing stage; no wax, no lacquer, just bare brass polished. It was in MUCH worse shape than yours when I got it. You can see, in the bottom right of the pic, another base in good but original aged condition for comparison that I have left untouched. View attachment 639222
Thanks to your help and instructions this is the result of my base. I'm thrilled with the result, I didn't think that it would ever be shiny again. Thank you very much.
David 20210223_163144.jpg
 
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MuseChaser

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2019
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Thanks to your help and instructions this is the result of my base. I'm thrilled with the result, I didn't think that it would ever be shiny again. Thank you very much.
David View attachment 639937
Looks great! Glad to know I was finally able to help someone in return for all the help I've received here. Good work!
 

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