How to re-fix wheel to arbour

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Snapper, Aug 14, 2019 at 11:42 AM.

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  1. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

    Nov 30, 2014
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    My Chinese? sea clock (the acquisition of which I posted about on here) has met with a small disaster. Whilst winding it this morning, the nipple which secures the fusee cable inside the fusee decided to part from said cable and it let me know about it in no uncertain terms! It is a relatively simple job to replace the nipple and I have done so.

    Fortunately the only damage caused appears to have been that it has freed the hour wheel such that the wheel now spins freely on the arbour. It was held by splines which were, I assume a press fit into the wheel. I have seen this method on many different clocks, however I have never had to carry out his sort of repair before. Could I ask for the best practice here please?

    Sea Clock-4.jpg Sea Clock-5.jpg
     
  2. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    Do you have a staking set or small punches? The goal is to extend the brass near the pinion to push some material between the leaves. It may be doubtful if this can be achieved by staking onlyso that the connection will be sufficiently strong. The opinions here will be split what to do best. Solder comes to mind, and when done properly, the repair will be almost invisible. But I'm afraid to open a can of worms by mentioning solder....

    Uhralt
     
  3. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

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    Thanks for the quick response. My staking set is for watches so does not have the capacity for this job. I could try using a small flat punch but the finished result would look a little rough. Soldering is a possibility but I would ask for any other possible solutions. e.g. adhesives?
     
  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    If the wheel is loose enough to lift off of the pinion, you might consider removing the wheel and peening around the hole to return the disrupted metal to its original location first. I think you will still need to move some metal into the spaces in order to get the grip required to stand the torque. If there is any looseness at all it will eventually work lose again. Some JB-Weld might help stabilize it afterit is staked soundly in place. Same thing for solder but I would not rely on soft solder without first staking the wheel on.

    RC
     
  5. R&A

    R&A Registered User

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    #5 R&A, Aug 14, 2019 at 8:14 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 15, 2019 at 8:15 AM
    No JB weld or Solder. Close the hole down from both sides, with a ball bearing and then re-stake the wheel in place.
     
  6. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    #6 RJSoftware, Aug 15, 2019 at 1:16 AM
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019 at 1:24 AM
    Peen directly center with near flat faced punch that has slightly larger diameter. Even slightly round nose punch would work well. Even though the contact point would appear to spread hole open, the brass mushrooms inward to create a tighter fit. The amount of peening and the strength of the hammer strike should be minimal. Peen test, peen test etc.. Once hole fit tightness desired then peen gear onto shaft pinion. Nothing fancy, hold shaft in vise upright, then use pliars to allow offset strike to install wheel flat. Hammer hits side of pliers held horizontle with arbor in pliers crack. Hard to explain.
     
  7. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

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    Thanks for all the suggestions. I will remove the wheel completely and try peening around the hole. I'll report back.
     
  8. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    I would take a piece of 3/16" cold rolled steel rod and grind one end down to a flat screw driver shape. Make the tip small enough to fit between the spline edges. I would use a small amount of super glue to hold the gear in place over the splines. Use the screw driver tip to peen the brass down into each of the splines. I would peen one spline then the oposing one on the other side then move on to the next two. Lite taps with the hammer should be enough to distort the brass down between each spline.
     
  9. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    I am late to the party but here is another two cents. Moving the metal (brass) or staking is a option and I have often seen it used.

    Another if you have a lathe, would be to drill out the damaged brass, make a bushing with a press fit (reducing the ID) then press onto the arbor. Not that anyone else would see it but I think it would look better? Good luck
     
  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    It appears to me that originally, the hole in the wheel was smaller than the arbor and was forced on with enough power that it would stay in place. If that assumption is correct, then the best repair would be to decrease the size of the hole in the wheel and then force it onto the arbor again. I don't see any evidence of staking after the fact.
     
  11. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    This type of repair was discussed in detail previously and I believe other alternatives were described. I've searched but can't find the thread. I believe Jerry Keefer weighed in as well. Perhaps someone can find that thread?

    RC
     
  12. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

    Nov 30, 2014
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    I am pleased to report that I have successfully re-affixed the wheel to the arbour following RJSoftware's suggestion above. I removed the wheel entirely and peened around the hole on both sides. The resulting fit was good, but a firmer and invisible fit was achieved by further "rivetting over" the splines protruding. The test was the arbour clamped in soft jaws in the vice and attempting to turn the wheel. Despite considerable applied force, the wheel remained tight.

    Thanks again for all who responded.
     

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