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Help How to let down springs

Ron Roberts

NAWCC Member
May 14, 2019
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see the attached photos of a picture clock I am just starting to restore. this is a grand sonnerie movement and I have not worked on this type movement before. my question is, how do I let down the springs since the click stop seems to be internal to the movement.
help will be appreciated.
also I do not recognize the makings on the dial. any help there will also be appreciated.

grand sonnerie.jpg picture clock dial.jpg Picture clock.jpg
 

shutterbug

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You should be able to get a small screwdriver or something similar into the click to raise it up. You might need another hand to hold the movement and put pressure against the wheel while holding the click open though ;)
 

Ron Roberts

NAWCC Member
May 14, 2019
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Sorry but that can not work. Especially for the time spring as it is completely between the plates. Also I looked closely and as you may be able to see in the below pictures there does not seem to be a way to get at the click stop.

left side.jpg right side.jpg
 

Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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Can't help with the springs. The dial was made for the market in Turkey.

Uhralt
 

JimmyOz

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Feb 21, 2008
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If you take off the gathering cam off the strike(s) side and take off the spring that holds the hammer in place (as to disengage the hammer) it should run down by itself. The time train, I can't see the verge, however if it has one that comes off take that off and let the spring run down, you can slow it down a bit with just putting your finger on the escapement wheel.
 
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shutterbug

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Jimmy beat me to it, but I was thinking the same thing. I know of one other clock that has no way of letting down the springs (the German time bomb - torsion clock) and you have to do it like that. Strange though .... I have never encountered that issue with a regular movement.
 

Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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Jimmy beat me to it, but I was thinking the same thing. I know of one other clock that has no way of letting down the springs (the German time bomb - torsion clock) and you have to do it like that. Strange though .... I have never encountered that issue with a regular movement.
You have the same issue with the fusee English dial clocks. You let them run down completely, then release the remaining pre-tension.

Uhralt
 

JimmyOz

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Feb 21, 2008
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I have had 2 movement like this, after you take it apart and fix what you think needs fixed, then only put one train in at a time to check it, once all 3 have been checked then put the whole thing back together, it will save having to take the whole thing apart a few times if you don't get it right the 1st time.
These are well made movements, however the desighner forgot to think about the repair man haveing to take it apart, the both I did were German.
 
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Ron Roberts

NAWCC Member
May 14, 2019
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To let down the springs I finally had to insert a small metal part to hold open the quarter hour and hour trains and allow the springs to dissipate their energy.
Thanks for the tip about reassembling one train at a time.
 

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