How important is provenance to you?

Discussion in 'Horological Misc' started by Rockin Ronnie, Dec 14, 2015.

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  1. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Nov 4, 2002
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    We do see too many who think a presentation Plaque is something to remove if it was not presented to you. This is the history of the clock and should always be left with it, even if you think it detracts from its appearance.
     
  2. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    I have a small time-only tower clock with an interesting provenance, with the account recorded in the Falkirk, Scotland historical ledger. A town hall was built in Falkirk in the early 1890s. They couldn’t afford a clock so the hole where the dial would go was simply boarded up. Hugh MacPherson, a business man, passed by the town hall daily and got sick of looking at the boarded up hole. So he bought the town a tower clock. The clock has a tag on it commemorating the gift in 1894.

    The building has since been torn down.

    Frank
     
  3. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    #23 Ralph, Apr 5, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2017
    Here's another American tallcase with an apparent history. I picked it up years ago at auction. The dial is signed Joseph Eberman, Lancaster. In side the door, their is a hand inscribed paper, that delineates the ownership over the clock over the years. For many years, I tried to understand the sequence of owners per the list and could never tie it up. Recently, with the help of the internet, and some license interpreting the list, ...........

    [​IMG]



    I think I finally cracked the provenance code on the Eberman. It was associated with one of the Landis families in Lancaster... this being based off the paper taped inside the door. of the clock.

    It looks like John was the original buyer, it went to his son Jacob H Landis, to his son John Herr Landis, to his daughter AnnaMary Landis Atlee, who was married to (Judge) Benjamin C Atlee... a fairly important guy. All this mostly in Millersville.

    It looks like Anna, apparently childless, must have given the clock to another heir, Nelson S Landis... but then later it looks like a non-family owner bought the clock??? sort of confusing at the end . The beginning of the list looks like the scribe made a typo error and the real lineage starts after the crossout.

    I still have some loose ends with Nelson. I'm trying to figure out where he fits.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Ralph
     

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  4. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Nov 18, 2012
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    Interesting. It would be interesting to see what you get when you connect all the dots, Ralph.

    Ron
     
  5. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User
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    Jul 26, 2015
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    How long did his generous gift last?
     
  6. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    Not sure. Somewhere I have the date when the building was torn down, but can't find it right now.

    Frank
     
  7. Dr. Jon

    Dr. Jon Registered User
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    Dec 14, 2001
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    I collect watches mostly although I have a few clocks. I love tracking teh provenance of my watches. I collect high grade watches and find that the people who personalized these left a record of their lives in various public media.

    I have a watch that after a lot of decoding I found to have belonged to teh man who arranged the financing to biong the Statue of Liberty to America. I have learned about some very interesting but otherwise little known aspects of history.



    Another belonged to very well regarded probate judge who died without a will.

    I have dug up some very moving stories from researching the provenance of my personalized watches.

    You can't wear all the watches and putting them in the vault is not much fun so I find the tracking down the history of their previous owners adds a lot of enjoyment.
     
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