Hot Hyde Glue Pot

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by Joseph Bautsch, Oct 16, 2018.

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  1. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    I'm always looking for ways to make using hot hyde glue easier. Up to recently I've been using an electric kettle with a temp control to heat the glue, not a convenient set up. I found this in a thrift store that makes things a little easier. The photo shows a Crock Pot Little Dipper, a 16oz. Ball canning jar and a HVAC thermometer. The Thermometer is not really needed. Its normal life is for serving chips etc. with a hot dip at parties. There is no temp control on it but none is needed. The temp range on this little pot is 140 to 150 degrees which is the range needed to melt hyde glue. I use it with a 16oz. Ball canning jar and lid. Put the jar in the Little Dipper, add water from 1/2 to 3/4 from the top rim (the more witer the higher the temp). and I get a temp range of 140 to 150 depending on the amount of glue in the jar. When you are finished using it just unplug, put the lid on the jar and return it to the refrigrator. (Do not freeze hyde glue. It is organic and freezing will destroy the glue.) The only drawback I found is that it can take 20 to 30 minutes for it to heat and melt the glue, but that is not much different from the electric kettle. There are several makes of this little pot on the market and I've seen most of them in thrift stores.

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  2. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Great idea. Have you thought of starting off with hot water in the pot? I leave the lid off the jar for a half hour or so. Gets rid of the humidity around the top of the jar. Then I seal it and put it in the fridge.

    Ron
     
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  3. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    #3 Joseph Bautsch, Oct 21, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
    Ron, I didn't think of that. Puting hot water in the pot to start with will save a lot of heat up time. I have also discovered the max temp of these little pots is 160 degrees if you fill the pot with water all the way up to the top rim. I have also discovered it you only fill the pot about 3/4 the way to temp will stay around 150 degrees, which is the max you want to heat hide glue. The less water in the pot the lower the temp it heats to. I picked up two of them at a thrift store really cheap. I keep one in the clock shop and the other one in the wood working shop.
     
  4. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User

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    I guess I am going to look for one of those mini crock pots. I saw one at a garage sale a couple months ago, but didn't give it a second thought.

    I tried one of those 110v plug in mug heaters. that wasn't worth a darn. I also bought an electric tea kettle, but the shape is poorly suited to this line of work, so I didn't bother taking it for a test drive. it was a 3.00 find at a garage sale anyway so not much financial investment.

    what works best for me is a metal dish and an electric griddle. it goes up to 400 degrees f or so. I don't use it anywhere near that temp, but the steel dish gives me good heat transfer. I usually set the griddle to about 250 or 275 initially to get the dish warm and then turn the temp down to about 180-190 degrees. my method gets me gluing really quickly. I do sometimes overheat the glue however and wind up with a dry skim over the top after a few minutes. it definitely isn't a perfect solution. I have been looking for something better.
     
  5. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Brian, I went through using all the same methods to melt hide glue as you have. My best solution up till I found the little dipper pot was a fondue pot with a temp control. It was large and clumsy. I had to set the temp and as often as not it would over heat the glue. I found the little dipper pot in a thrift store for $3.00 with a 50% discount for seniors day. What the heck for $1.50 I'll try it and it worked out great.
     
  6. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    I bought a small candy thermometer to keep the temperature steady.
    Ron
     
  7. Natedog

    Natedog Registered User

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    Is Hyde glue the same as scotch glue? Proper stinks when warm. Got taught veneering using scotch glue at school, not that I was much good at it
     
  8. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User

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    hyde glue smells like a dog's wet rawhide chew. personally, I really don't find the smell offensive. I prefer it over the scent of my various bottles of titebond.
     
  9. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    I recommend keeping the lid sealing disc on the jar as a means to keep as much of the water that evaporates in the hide glue. That keeps the glue from drying out quite as fast. It makes a big difference in heating it up and in use.

    Jar Lid.jpeg
     
  10. Clocks In The Grove

    Clocks In The Grove Registered User
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    Joseph (more coffee) spells the glue as "hide" in post 9. I wonder if 'Hyde' is a brand name? My Titebond brand says 'Liquid Hide Wood Glue' on the plastic bottle
    It is easy to use but If I glue things up very often I would go with the hot hide glue. Joseph I see you started this thread and spelled it 'Hyde' was that a typo?
    ..Bob..
     
  11. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    The name hide refers to the source of the material the glue is made out of. It can include the word animal or a specific kind. I was involved in the printing and bookbinding field for many years and that is the way we asked for it when purchasing. Most of our usage was for flexible hide glue which includes glycerine.
    I use a small coffee pot with a rehostat attached to it to keep the water warm but not boiling. In it I have either a glass bottle or a tin can. Works great also for dipping chocolates.
     
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  12. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    #12 Charles E. Davis, Nov 7, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
    I fixed my typo and some how I am stuck with this message,. Sorry I can't get rid of it
     
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  13. Phil Burman

    Phil Burman Registered User

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    I recently bought one of these, it works perfectly. The temperature controller goes over-temperature for rapid melt then settles down to a very steady temperature control, see plot below. Of course they are also available in the USA. I was initially concerned about the over-temp start-up so I warmed up to a stable temperature before inserting the pot however this seems to be an unnecessary precaution.

    Phil


    upload_2018-12-23_12-39-11.png

    upload_2018-12-23_12-42-29.png
     
  14. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Here is an update on another Hide Glue Pot. This one is the same as the Little Dipper, just larger, by about 50%. Found it at a thrift store for $3.00. No need to buy the much more expensive heat control type. Both of these hot pots heat to the same temp, about 150 F. The larger green pot, one qt. Crock-Ette, works just the same as the smaller black pot, but it takes a one quart jar to heat a larger volume of hide glue for the bigger jobs. You can use a 2.5" brush with this one. As with the smaller pot if you leave the metal lid on while hot, it will keep the moisture in and keep the glue from drying out.
    Large Hide Glue Pot.jpeg
     

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