Hoadley Miniature Wooden Works Alarm Mystery

David D'Apice

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Good evening. I'm hoping someone out there can help me identify the missing piece (assuming there is one) on this Hoadley miniature wooden works with Alarm. There appears to be an alarm setting pipe that has a cam, but the cam doesn't seem to engage anything to activate or silence the alarm when it comes around. Any information would be super helpful. I might be able to fabricate a solution. Thanks in advance. Here's a photo of what I've got. The weird wire coming off the alarm gong arbor doesn't seem to make sense, but I have see it on others, perhaps it's just a stop. Is there another wire linkage I'm missing?

IMG_1242.jpg
 

gleber

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It looks like the strike arbor is installed backwards. The wheel to the left of the escape wheel has what looks like marks from two pins that stick out the other side. If the strike arbor were reversed, it looks like that tail would engage with the pins to lift the strike and release it.

Tom
 

David D'Apice

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Tom -- thanks for the thoughts. I don't think it will work to flip the strike arbor around -- there is a yoke on one end of it that is what gets driven and clattered when it alarms. See these photos ----

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David D'Apice

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I also see in this photo from another one that there is the angular wire on the strike hammer pointing to the norteast, like mine --- you can see it through the hole in the front plate.

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David D'Apice

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possible there's some sort of pivoting lever mounted to the back of the front plate. I see a little staple/bent wire beneath the northeast most large hole in the front plate. MAybe there's something mounted on the underside of that plate.
 

gleber

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Okay, I think I'm understanding this better. Does the small wheel that looks like a pinion-only near the right edge of the plate in the last two photos of your movement have a cam under it? It looks like that would rock the yoke back and forth.

I also understand the question better, but not the movement. Are there only 3 wheels and the yoke / strike arbor on the strike train? Is there a lock to prevent the strike from running free? It would be nice to see what is going on under some of the wheels.

Tom
 

David D'Apice

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Hi ---- thanks ---- here are a few more photos -- there are only three wheels in the alarm train. I've tried to show the central alarm hub as well with its cam. It appears to engage with nothing at the moment, which is why I'm suspect of the two tiny holes in the front plate that I've shown as well. Unless the alarm hub on engages or lets something free when the cam comes around, there's no way to stop the alarm or let it start that I can see. I've also shown the pin that rattles the yoke. Thanks again. Dave

IMG_1245.jpg IMG_1246.jpg IMG_1247.jpg IMG_1248.jpg
 

Jim DuBois

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Not certain this will help but here are two versions of the Hoadley's, and no, I don't have any photos of the internals. Photos of the movements and alarm details from Rogers and Arvay, COG Journal 1995. There is also a good article in the Feb. 1975 Bulletin on alarm wood works, but sadly does not detail your movement, but several other makers are shown in detail.
ALARM TRAIN
1st 30
2nd 24-6
3rd 6
Plus hammer arbor carrying
oak fork

hoadley alarm 2.jpg hoadley alarm.jpg
 

gleber

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So, it looks like you are missing a rocker arm at least from the Bulletin pictures. This is getting above my pay grade since I am not familiar with these directly - just trying to use my experience to contribute. I'll continue to watch this thread.

Tom
 

Dick C

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Hi ---- thanks ---- here are a few more photos -- there are only three wheels in the alarm train. I've tried to show the central alarm hub as well with its cam. It appears to engage with nothing at the moment, which is why I'm suspect of the two tiny holes in the front plate that I've shown as well. Unless the alarm hub on engages or lets something free when the cam comes around, there's no way to stop the alarm or let it start that I can see. I've also shown the pin that rattles the yoke. Thanks again. Dave

View attachment 553601 View attachment 553602 View attachment 553603 View attachment 553604
I believe that the alarm stops when the weight hits the bottom of the clock.
 

dlb1052

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Dear Dave and other watchers,
I am not sure this will be much help but I will try. I took my Silas Hoadley upside-down alarm apart this afternoon to try and help with a couple photos. I would not venture to explain this without. My movement is, of course different but the same principle operation. Yes, I believe you are missing something but not much. The alarm is activated by the cam on the hour pipe and the cam on the hub when they connect and the alarm will go off. The only stop is when the weight hits the bottom of the case. I have sent two photos perhaps one better then the other. It is a very difficult photo to take (for me anyway). In the center, is a post, the right side has a flat finger that puts pressure against the hour wheel. The other side of the post has a rod that goes through the front plate and holds/stops the alarm hammer (just barely). The spring holds pressure against that rod. The finger holds pressure against the hour wheel until the cam is able to push up into the cams on the setting disc/hub. Simultaneously the spring putting pressure on the rod going up through the plate holding the alarm hammer comes downward (toward the inside out the movement) and unlocks the alarm hammer to start striking the bell. Hope this is clearer then mud and hope it helps you and others. Diane

IMG_20191027_163021223.jpg IMG_20191027_163325623.jpg
 

dlb1052

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Dear Dave,
Back again. You are missing the rocker arm assembly in figure 20 that Jim Dubois was nice enough to provide to us viewers. Thanks Jim.
 

David D'Apice

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Wow ----- to all of you -- I can't thank you enough! I had a suspect that the rocker might look something like that --- but the photos in the old 1969 bulletin were a little fuzzy ---- Jim -- Diane --- Dick, Tom and Steve --- and others --- you guys are the absolute best ---- I'm going to fabricate the rocket arm! So happily!!

Sorry for my tardy thanks ---- I have my settings set to alert me to responses, but for some reason, they don't.
 
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dlb1052

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maybe a little help.
post height from plate 5/8"
post diameter 3/16"
flat finger 3/4"
post to 90 degree bend 3/4"
90 degree bend to alarm hammer 7/8"
Yours maybe different but it's a starting point.
Don't forget you need a tension spring also. Sorry you are on your own with trial and error.
Glad you are willing to attempt this project. Good luck. Diane
 

David D'Apice

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What fun --- here's the photo of the pieces after having made the post and the rocker arm --- by trial and error, I was pretty close --- I also made two retaining springs for the main alarm cannon -- both of these were replaced with a piece of bus wire. At the moment, the movement is running --- and when I turn the alarm cannon, the inner gear pops forward, and guess what -- the alarm starts to clatter. What a great sign. I tried to make the parts of things that might have been around in the period. Not a pro, but a historian primarily. I've wound the small weight again -- let's hope tonite, I'm awoken by a loud bell --- I'll likely smile and go back to sleep! Thanks to all of you, this piece is doing its thing! Likely 100 years since the parts were removed and never returned. The only let-down is the toothpicks!

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David D'Apice

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No word of a lie -- this morning at 7:30AM we were awakened by a loud ringing alarm. It was complete coincidence that my wife didn't set our modern alarm. Without Silas Hoadley, we would have completely overslept! Hilarious. What are the chances! Thanks to everyone this is one clock that is complete once again and set back into the working world. That's so rewarding. Thanks. Dave
 

Jim DuBois

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Nice work and congratulations! A working alarm that got used too! I have a friend that had a very high powered job that used a woodworks tall clock with alarm to get him up and on the road for many years. He didn't wind the strike side as the clock was in their bedroom..........
 
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