High Grade un-named Elgin watches

Dr. Jon

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I have been going over my collection and re-encountered a nice Elgin 162. It is typical, enough like many others in photos posted here that I am not posting another photo. Mine has a Peacock dial, inscribed for Christmas 1908 and is in a gold case, which is typical for those I have seen on line.

My research in Ehrhardt's Elgin book came up with a catalog in which the 162 was marked Lord Elgin and cost about twice what a comparable Veritas cost, $99 in 1913. It is a lovely watch with a lot of gold in its settings and I suspect the regulator screw is gold.

My other surprise is that this watch has a single roller. This makes some sense because the benefit of the double roller is superior resistance to shock. Perhaps this is because it was for people not doing the manual labor of railroad types.

Were these watches sold to compete with the Watham Maximus and American movements? and how ere they marketed?
 
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grtnev

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I have been going over my collection and re-encountered a nice Elgin 162. It is typical, enough like many others in photos posted here that I am not posting another photo. Mine has a Peacock dial, inscribed for Christmas 1908 and is in a gold case, which is typical for those I have seen on line.

My research in Ehrhardt's Elgin book came up with a catalog in which the 162 was marked Lord Elgin and cost about twice what a comparable Veritas cost, $99 in 1913. It is a lovely watch with a lot of gold in its settings and I suspect the regulator screw is gold.

My other surprise is that this watch has a single roller. This makes some sense because the benefit of the double roller is superior resistance to shock. Perhaps this is because it was for people not doing the manual labor of railroad types.

Were these watches sold to compete with the Watham Maximus and American movements? and how ere they marketed?
Dr Jon,

Following link May provide some insight.


Richard
 

musicguy

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These grade 162's have very nice looking movements.


Rob
 
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Dr. Jon

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I had seen that thread before I posted. I would like to get some information the strategy behind these models and how Elgin promoted them, as distinguished from railroad items.
 

Dr. Jon

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I tried to answer my own question by checking the Elgin site to look at the various Elgin ads and catalogs of the period 1908-1918 and found only a few items om the Lord Elgin named variants. They describe Lord Elgin's as thinner Elgin watches. These are the named variants of teh high end unnamed grades but nothing about the high end un-named grades.

They clearly spent a lot ot money and effortt on the design and build of not very many watches and Elgin was very profit oriented. My best guess is that they were using word of mouth from distributors to retailers to promote these watches..
 
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Dr. Jon

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Here is another one I find interesting. It is a grade 174 a 0 size watch.
DSC00079.png

I have not been able to find any period catalog information on this grade.

This thing in this is that it seems to have a non magnetic balance spring.

DSC00075_c.png

What were they thinking?
 

Rick Hufnagel

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That's interesting! I checked an up and coming project. A grade 263, (0s model 2, 17J, adj, raised settings). It's a standard hairspring.. my grade 264 (same thing but open-faced) also has a standard hairspring.

I've not noticed too many antimagnetic hairsprings on Elgins... Maybe a special order?

A beautiful movement, thanks!
 
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Dr. Jon

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The rest of the movement is not antimagnetic. The balance wheel looks to be steel as is the lever but the escape wheel is gold or gilt brass.

The Swiss were interested in palladium springs because they had better middle temperature performance, at the cost of variation in positions and day to day.
It is also less subject to rust.

It may have been an experiment to see whether anyone would notice. Perhaps, about 115 years later, someone did!
 
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