Herschede clock identification

dasmith

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Feb 1, 2021
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Hello!

I recently purchased a grandfather clock, and am looking to identify exactly what I have. The works are definitely herschede, but I'm not as sure about the case. The serial number on the back of the works is 03205. I've attached a picture for reference. Let me know if I can provide any further details!

- David Smith

IMG_9084.jpg IMG_9087 2.jpg
 

new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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Welcome to the forum.

Why are you not sure about the case? It looks to be in the style of cases that Herschede offered.

Regards.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Looks like one of the "last gasp" clocks. Your movement is likely a Jauch. Still a nice clock but more along the lines of other modern clocks. Others will know more, Willie
 

claussclocks

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I agree with WillieX. It is looks like one of the later Herschede. However, I was surprised recently when I went on a service call to find one of these with a Kieninger movement. It's too bad they didn't use them universally. I don't care for Jauch movements. In my opinion they were not as well made as the Kieningers.
 

dasmith

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Feb 1, 2021
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Looks like No. 505 Marietta. 76"h, 20.25w, 13.25d
Thank you so much! It would have taken me years to figure out what model I had. As a follow up, do you have a guess for as the the value, and ideas of where to sell a clock like this?

Best,
David
 

J. A. Olson

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Dec 21, 2006
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Herschede went in and out of almost every then-present German manufacturer of clock movements during the Starkville years and they are not well documented because all tend to be similar to one another in design and construction quality. Starting off with customary Urgos movements during the 1960's which were a special design commissioned just for Herschede, but prone to problems with the flywheels chattering which led to their abandonment. These clocks were signed with the Herschede crown like your movement. Gong units were either made at Herschede (red block, silvery rods) or imported from Germany (blued steel rods, black block).

Following that it was a minefield of standardized Gebr. Jauch KG, Erhard Jauch, Kieninger and even Hermle movements which varied upon which types of clocks they were used in and for how long. Though not comparable to the older Cincinnati-era rod chime and tubular bell clocks, the chimes tend to sound nice on all these clocks and the cases are a cut above the competition.

The value for most chime clocks in America right now just isn't what it was prior to 2008. Getting $300-400 for this clock in good working order would be doing well but no estimate is guaranteed. I wish I could say it'd pull a high-five-figure price based on name alone, but it's just not going to happen. At the very least there are still people interested in these clocks so it's beneficial to sell off to dedicated hobbyists regardless of the end price. eBay would be the most commonly suggested selling place.
 

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