Hermle quartz movement hands not turning

Jaap

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Hi all, last week we've got a Hermle clock in for repair at the charity shop. The customer bought this clock 5 months a go. He was complaning that the hands did not move. He wasn't able to show the buying ticket. But they took it in for repair. Giving the customer the benefit of the doubt. So I've looked at it and found a cracked minute pipe. The bushing had come out of the minute pipe, because of the crack. I've been able to push in the bushing throug the wheel and the friction plate in the minute pipe andglue it with a good type of glue. The only problem was the wheel under the friction plate had to slip. After the glue was set I managed to let the wheel slipping again. Now the clock is happly showing the time again.
300833.jpg 300834.jpg 300835.jpg 300836.jpg 300837.jpg 300838.jpg 300839.jpg Picture 6 is showing the split in the minute pipe.

Thanks for reading,
Jaap
 

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shutterbug

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Nice fix, but a lot of work for something that could have been replaced for $6.00 :) Timesavers.com
 

Jaap

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Nice fix, but a lot of work for something that could have been replaced for $6.00 :) Timesavers.com
Hi Shut, I know but I was curious if I could repair this one. :whistle:I've had already found another movement on the internet at Cousins in the Uk. But as I'm still recovering from my illness, I would try to repair this one and so still setting my goals further.
At this moment I have a Friesian clock with 2 angels and an atlas figure on top. It was a gift to the charity shop. The clock is serviced and in good working order. One of the Chimneys was missing so I have made a new one
The angels are missing their wings. And yes I can buy them in Holland I know.
But I will try to cut them from balsa wood. So I will explore my woodcutting craft. I will show some pictures of the carving later.
Jaap

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harold bain

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Doing it "because you can" is a perfectly good reason. If you are not doing this because you need the money, why not see what can be fixed or made rather than replaced? I find that every day is an improvement, if only a small one, after a stroke.
 

Jaap

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Doing it "because you can" is a perfectly good reason. If you are not doing this because you need the money, why not see what can be fixed or made rather than replaced? I find that every day is an improvement, if only a small one, after a stroke.
Hi Harold, thanks for your kind words. My motto is "What they put together in a factory, I can disassemble to see how it works and how I can repair it. Today I bought some Balsa wood and made the wings for the angels. So now I will carve some depths in the wings and paint them. It all went well today. 300947.jpg 300948.jpg 300949.jpg

Jaap
 

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shutterbug

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Good work! How did you attach the wings?
 

THTanner

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An interesting alternative is to take the balsa wings you have made and have a 3D printer recreate them with the corn starch printing media. Then you encase the 3D printed objects in plaster of Paris to create a "lost wax" mold. The corn starch melts at a fairly low temperature, so you then pour molten brass, copper or aluminum into the mold and end up with a metal copy of what you have carved.

Hi Harold, thanks for your kind words. My motto is "What they put together in a factory, I can disassemble to see how it works and how I can repair it. Today I bought some Balsa wood and made the wings for the angels. So now I will carve some depths in the wings and paint them. It all went well today.

Jaap
 

Tinker Dwight

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Oct 11, 2010
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One thing that we should begin to see as a general trend
is that plastic under tension is likely to fail.
I'm beginning to think as a person that repairs clocks is that
any press fit plastic wheel or pinion should be removed, reamed
and then put back on with some appropriate adhesive.
The list of places I've seen split gears range from cameras, to music
boxes, to clocks.
All the failures except one have been from the press fit arbor out.
The exception was stripped teeth on a pencil sharpeners.
Stressed plastic is just a bad idea.
Love the wings.
Tinker Dwight
 

Jaap

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Hi Shut, in post #3 the last picture, you see the angel from the back. At the back there are 2 holes where the wings fit in.
 

Jaap

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Hi Thanner, I like to work with simple tools for creating parts. I don't like to invest $$$ in a 3d printer, with lots parts who can go faulty. I like to keep it simple. A cutting knife and some sanding paper and a juweler saw is good for me. The angels will fly better with wings of Balsa wood. Not as heavy as Brass.:D
 

THTanner

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I understand the concern and the advantage of balsa. Where I live, I have access to a practically free 3D printer at both the local college and library. I just have to supply the printing media and pay a small fee for usage time. I could not tell if the rest of the angel is metal or not, but balsa seems like a fine way to do it.

Hi Thanner, I like to work with simple tools for creating parts. I don't like to invest in a 3d printer, with lots parts who can go faulty. I like to keep it simple. A cutting knife and some sanding paper and a juweler saw is good for me. The angels will fly better with wings of Balsa wood. Not as heavy as Brass.:D
 

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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I understand the concern and the advantage of balsa. Where I live, I have access to a practically free 3D printer at both the local college and library. I just have to supply the printing media and pay a small fee for usage time. I could not tell if the rest of the angel is metal or not, but balsa seems like a fine way to do it.
Hi THTanner, it is great to have the change to use this new technics.
At my last job we had a label printer with cutter and I made the mask for a dial for a anniversary clock. It cuts out the numbers so I could use it for spraying the numbers on the dial. The body of the angels is brass.
 

Jaap

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Mar 6, 2013
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Hi THTanner, it is great to have the change to use this new technics.
At my last job we had a label printer with cutter and I made the mask for a dial for a anniversary clock. It cuts out the numbers so I could use it for spraying the numbers on the dial. The body of the angels is brass.
After making 4 new wings the angels are now ready for take off.
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