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Hermle Movement 1051-020 Broken Mainspring

Ron6519

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Oct 9, 2021
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I bought a wall regulator with a Howard Miller (Hermle) movement. One of the mainsprings is broken. Can the mainspring barrel be removed without taking apart the movement? Any video source to do so?

Thanks
Ron

Howard Miller Movement 612-432.jpg
 
Last edited:

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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The answer to your question is YES, if the picture shows the movement in question.
Let down the spring (HA). Remove a snap ring on the rear of the main arbor, then slide the arbor forward. If you find the spring intact, the failure was probably caused by a faulty click assembly. The type shown in your photo is known to fail.
The bad news is that you may have teeth missing from the barrel, a bent second wheel arbor, maybe some teeth missing there and possibly some damage above that.
New barrels are available through the normal suppliers and replacement wheels are supplied by some.
Probably all of the click assemblies should be brought up to speed as they all have gone thorough the same winding processes.
What is the date code on the rear of the movement?
Best of luck with your new found clock.
Dick
 
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Ron6519

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Here's the info on the back of the movement. At this point, I have no idea what you just printed. I do not speak, "clock" I will need to find an exploded, labeled movement for interpretation. I've looked at the gears in the back of the movement and haven't seen any damaged. I'll take a closer look later today. Thanks for the information. Howard Miller Movement 612-432.jpg
 

Dick Feldman

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The movement shown in your first post is not the same as the third post.
The movement shown in your third post was manufactured in 1980, making it 41+/- years old.
Those movements normally have a 20-25 year life span.
I am sorry I talked "clock."
Sounds like you need a clock professional.
Best,
Dick
 

Ron6519

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The movement shown in your first post is not the same as the third post.
The movement shown in your third post was manufactured in 1980, making it 41+/- years old.
Those movements normally have a 20-25 year life span.
I am sorry I talked "clock."
Sounds like you need a clock professional.
Best,
Dick
Interesting that when you put in a search for a 1051-020 you get multiple results. The first post was a generic, "1051-020" search. The last post was the actual movement. I have access to Sundial Farm Clocks in Greenlawn, so if I need additional help, I can use them.
You deal with a variety of clock questions from a variety of people. "Clock" talk is what you do. It's up to us to get up to speed. It's always good to learn new things. Even if the new things are a little more complicated then we would like.
I thought the movement was older then 1980. But just because a movement was built in 1980, doesn't mean it's been used for 41+ years
I'd be surprised if I couldn't post photos of this puppy running without "professional" intervention.
Thanks for the feedbck.
 

Dick Feldman

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I thought the movement was older then 1980. But just because a movement was built in 1980, doesn't mean it's been used for 41+ years
Although all 1051-020/"XX" movements will interchange, there were certain production changes made. The "XX" is important as that is the pendulum length. Yours is 45 cm. I am in the clock repair business and have been for a long time. Subtle changes are apparent to me and are important. Clock repair is not just nuts and bolts and the knowledge is not obtained through osmosis. The two clocks shown in your pictures are different enough to give a different answer to your original question.
This board is populated with people of all levels of competence. You can get some bad advice here. Be forewarned.
Many years experience tells me that dependable working clocks are not offered for sale. That has more to do with human nature than clocks. People who own clocks do not sell/donate/abandon working clocks. The normal lifespan of a Hermle movement is 20-25 years which means that your clock has been around almost twice as long as a normal lifespan. That is a different perspective than it's not been used 41 years. It has been here 41+ years and probably ran the first 20-25. If it has been idle for 20 or so years, it is still worn out. Clock movements are not like a cut on your hand--they do not heal. You have a 99% chance the movement in your clock is worn to the point that it cannot give dependable service. (Do you still drive your 1980 automobile?) As an aside, The clock market is in sad shape today. Used or used, non working clocks are not bringing very much money. I hope you did not overspend.
Your best choice for getting your clock to run dependably will likely be to replace the movement with a new movement with a warranty. You are in luck that your style movement is still made. Replacement of a movement is within the scope of a novice like you (with some help).
We would be happy to help if that is your choice.
Best,
Dick
 
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Ron6519

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Oct 9, 2021
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Although all 1051-020/"XX" movements will interchange, there were certain production changes made. The "XX" is important as that is the pendulum length. Yours is 45 cm. I am in the clock repair business and have been for a long time. Subtle changes are apparent to me and are important. Clock repair is not just nuts and bolts and the knowledge is not obtained through osmosis. The two clocks shown in your pictures are different enough to give a different answer to your original question.
This board is populated with people of all levels of competence. You can get some bad advice here. Be forewarned.
Many years experience tells me that dependable working clocks are not offered for sale. That has more to do with human nature than clocks. People who own clocks do not sell/donate/abandon working clocks. The normal lifespan of a Hermle movement is 20-25 years which means that your clock has been around almost twice as long as a normal lifespan. That is a different perspective than it's not been used 41 years. It has been here 41+ years and probably ran the first 20-25. If it has been idle for 20 or so years, it is still worn out. Clock movements are not like a cut on your hand--they do not heal. You have a 99% chance the movement in your clock is worn to the point that it cannot give dependable service. (Do you still drive your 1980 automobile?) As an aside, The clock market is in sad shape today. Used or used, non working clocks are not bringing very much money. I hope you did not overspend.
Your best choice for getting your clock to run dependably will likely be to replace the movement with a new movement with a warranty. You are in luck that your style movement is still made. Replacement of a movement is within the scope of a novice like you (with some help).
We would be happy to help if that is your choice.
Best,
Dick
Dick, I actually drive 2 1960's cars and a 1971. I paid $65.00 for the clock, sans the pendulum. I know a clock restorer at Sundial Farm, in Greenlawn, NY. If I run into a problem, he can look at it. But since he's 84, I'm not going to bother him if I can work the problem. I have no doubt that this movement will work again. And if it doesn't, it doesn't. I wouldn't spend money($400.00) on a replacement movement.
What I'm looking for is a video to remove the left side mainspring drum. Or an exploded movement parts list with labeled parts. The labeled parts will help with the, "clock talk" translation
The first photo has been replaced with my movement to avoid any further confusion.
Appreciate the time for the response.
 
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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Remove the screw on the click wheel retainer, the arbor slides out the front and the barrel slides out the to the side. It's usually best to replace the complete barrel assemble.

And, you can expect exactly what DF has outlined in his posts.

Willie X
 
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Ron6519

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Oct 9, 2021
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Here is what you are looking for. Was not able to find a .020 diagram, but the only difference between the 020 and 030 is the position of the hammers.

Enjoy :D
Excellent piece of information!
Appreciate it very much.
 

Ron6519

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Oct 9, 2021
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Thanks for all the information. I'll get back to you when I get the clock up an running(or not)
 

Ron6519

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Oct 9, 2021
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Clock is up and running/chiming. Just need to refinish the case. Video was cut short before the chiming part. Chimes on all three songs. Took a day for the chimes to ,"sync".
Didn't need to replace the mainspring. I'm thinking the spring hadn't been wound for such a long time, what felt like slipping was just, unsticking. Am interested to see if it runs the whole 8 days on a full windup.
Will work on the Grandfather clock next.
Thanks for the help.
 

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