• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

hermle 340-020 running fast with little rotation from balance wheel.

Conner'sClocks

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Alright, so before anyone asks, I have cleaned and oiled this clock, and I have made sure there is no worn bushings. Same with my dad. we both found nothing wrong.

However the rotation in the floating balance wheel (since it is dated back to 1985) is still little to almost nothing, and it still runs fast. even on slowest regulation. I really do not want to have to adjust weights if I can help it.

for a small detail, it gained over 50 minutes in the span of 6 hours.
 
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tracerjack

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But, did you actually try the test when the floating balance was out of the movement? The test would certainly help you decide whether the lack of rotation is a damaged balance or lack of power.
 

Conner'sClocks

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But, did you actually try the test when the floating balance was out of the movement? The test would certainly help you decide whether the lack of rotation is a damaged balance or lack of power.
yeah, and it completed the test successfully, however as soon as I put it back in the movement, it lost rotation.
 

Conner'sClocks

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Attached is a link showing how much rotation is in the movement. I currently dont have time to capture video from when it was out of the movement.

(would be a direct file if .mov files were able to be sent)

 

tracerjack

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There has also been posts about the fork interfering with rotation on the floating balance. You could so a search of the archives, or wait for the experts to respond. There are several on the forum that have extensive knowledge on the floating balance.
 

Conner'sClocks

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There has also been posts about the fork interfering with rotation on the floating balance. You could so a search of the archives, or wait for the experts to respond. There are several on the forum that have extensive knowledge on the floating balance.
I can agree with that statement. I have also read that, but has not stopped since I started it up a month ago (winding it every week). to me it doesnt sound uneven either, I can tell it runs faster because every time I restart it, I see it go full rotation like it is supposed to, but after 15-20 ticks and tocks, it slows down.
 

tracerjack

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I see what you mean about the spring action. Wait for the experts. I’m sure they will soon see your post.
 

wow

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The fork must be adjusted properly. A tiny bend outward or inward makes a big difference sometimes.I use tweezers and carefully bend the fork in and out until it reaches maximum rotation. Even if it rotates on its own outside the movement, it may need adjustment once it has power.
 

Conner'sClocks

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The fork must be adjusted properly. A tiny bend outward or inward makes a big difference sometimes.I use tweezers and carefully bend the fork in and out until it reaches maximum rotation. Even if it rotates on its own outside the movement, it may need adjustment once it has power.
but even then, would it have a full rotation cycle for at least 20 ticks and then slow down, could that still be a possible cause?
 

Conner'sClocks

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I see what you mean about the spring action. Wait for the experts. I’m sure they will soon see your post.
yeah, the owner of this clock has requested I keep it original. so I cant replace the movement even if I wanted to. the owner got this from his grandfather from General Motors, and he does not want a replacement movement.
 

Willie X

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This problem is brought up about every month or so. So, the best thing to do is read all of the old threads, starting with the 3 that are automatically placed below this conversation. The rotation should be total 360°. Thats 180° in both directions from the "at rest" point.
Note, It would be very rare for a 36 year old Hermle not to have serious wear in at least a few places. Willie X
 

Conner'sClocks

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This problem is brought up about every month or so. So, the best thing to do is read all of the old threads, starting with the 3 that are automatically placed below this conversation. The rotation should be total 360°. Thats 180° in both directions from the "at rest" point.
Note, It would be very rare for a 36 year old Hermle not to have serious wear in at least a few places. Willie X
Perhaps I am not seeing wear. I’ll have to go over it again here soon. The total rotation is around 180° (90 degrees in both directions) which makes me believe I missed something in terms of wear. I’ll have to check it out soon to double check though.
 

tracerjack

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Per Willie X’s advice, look again for wear. I’ve had more than one movement in which I thought the pivot holes were fine only to find that was not the case on a second exam. I’ve used his suggestion of adding oil to the pivot holes, and it really does enhance being able to see the pivots sideways movement. Particularly those tiny pivots.
 

Conner'sClocks

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Per Willie X’s advice, look again for wear. I’ve had more than one movement in which I thought the pivot holes were fine only to find that was not the case on a second exam. I’ve used his suggestion of adding oil to the pivot holes, and it really does enhance being able to see the pivots sideways movement. Particularly those tiny pivots.
Perhaps, Maybe the Ultrasonic cleaner missed some of the dirt in the cleaning process, that I was unaware of. especially towards the bottom of the movement. since it most likely has spread since being put back together. I have read that dirt buildups can cause friction, therefore exchanging that with less power. if that is true, then I will have to take the movement apart again so I can clean it thoroughly, but im not at my shop with the clock or any of my tools, so that will have to be another time.
 

Willie X

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The clock has to be taken apart to "clean" it, although a good wear check can be done after a rinse, or intact US cleaning.
Wear in the top of the train is difficult to see, it takes good light and magnification. I'm pretty sure there will be obvious wear at the second arbor and barrels. The spring has to be let down for the wear check.
Note, with the balance assembly removed and the mainspring half wound up, move the little fork back and forth with a toothpick. It should snap from one side to the other with a lively action and a sharp tick, repeat many times. This is a pretty good test to separate power issues from escapement issues. Willie X
 

shutterbug

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Those helix spring balances have two jewels, top and bottom, and a thin wire that runs through them. It's common for one jewel to break or clog up with dirt and debris. Do the test outside of the movement as mentioned above, and if that fails, contact David LaBounty. He does a great job of rebuilding them.
 

R. Croswell

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Alright, so before anyone asks, I have cleaned and oiled this clock, and I have made sure there is no worn bushings. Same with my dad. we both found nothing wrong.

However the rotation in the floating balance wheel (since it is dated back to 1985) is still little to almost nothing, and it still runs fast. even on slowest regulation. I really do not want to have to adjust weights if I can help it.

for a small detail, it gained over 50 minutes in the span of 6 hours.
First, this clock cannot be expected to keep time with that wimpy balance rotation so do not add weights or attempt to regulate it until you have 360 degrees total rotation. You said it passed the "spin test" but you did not say how you did the test. See the attached - with the balance removed from the movement and clamped in a vice, turn the balance 270 degrees and let go (do not spin it). It must continue to move back and forth on its own for a minimum of 3 minutes to pass the test. If the balance does not pass see the attached for instructions. DO NOT OIL the balance, if it has already been oiled that may be the problem. Your balance must pass before going further.

If you have not done so, you need to completely disassemble the movement, including removing the mainsprings from their barrels and clean everything. As has been pointed out, it would be very unusual to fine one of these this age that does not need considerable pivot and bushing work. This movement is not tolerant of wear. It may have plated pivot failures as well.

RC
 

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