$ HELP!

we7hills

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I just inherited a small, 14K pocket watch (Half-hunter - open glass over face?) with no identification on the movement, but a serial number on the outer case that matches the number on the inner case (METAL 156768) and very light hand engraving BR1910B (or R?) and another engraving that looks like Mc 4708 or 4718, or 17/18? also on the outer case, and a little push-button to change the time with the crown. No manufacturer name on case or movement.
I am a newbie here. Any help identifying and valuing this piece would be appreciated. I was able to wind it up and it seems to be keeping good time! :)
Thanks in advance!

01 Face.jpg 02 face.jpg 03 back.jpg 04 button.jpg 05 open.jpg 06 inner.jpg 07 movement.jpg 08 14k & SN.jpg 09 back inside.jpg 10 SN.jpg 11 BR1910B.jpg 12 Mc17 18.jpg
 
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musicguy

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moving Swiss watch to European section

Welcome to the NAWCC forum


Rob
 
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richiec

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we7hills, what I can tell you is that the inner cover is base metal, not gold, it is a Swiss watch of moderate quality with a nice dial. Probably made in the mid to last quarter of the 19th century. There may be some marks under the dial that may help in identifying the maker but I wouldn't hold out much hope of that. The small etching below metal is a watchmakers mark and may be from 1910 or maybe not, most watchmakers had their own systems to denote what the repairs were and without their ledgers we are clueless. Other more accomplished European watch enthusiasts may come a long later and give you more information.
 

we7hills

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we7hills, what I can tell you is that the inner cover is base metal, not gold, it is a Swiss watch of moderate quality with a nice dial. Probably made in the mid to last quarter of the 19th century. There may be some marks under the dial that may help in identifying the maker but I wouldn't hold out much hope of that. The small etching below metal is a watchmakers mark and may be from 1910 or maybe not, most watchmakers had their own systems to denote what the repairs were and without their ledgers we are clueless. Other more accomplished European watch enthusiasts may come a long later and give you more information.
WOW! Thank you so much! :)
 

richiec

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I am not really familiar with Swiss markings for precious metals like gold. A lot of times the cuvette as the inner cover is called is a base metal so it is strong enough to seal the movement from dust and debris.
 
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179

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Your photo of the inner side of the back cover indicates to be gold filled to me.
 

topspin

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I see a lot of watches just like this one - small, anonymous, with fancy dial, and a similar or identical movement. The pin/nail set is also quite typical.

Enjoy it for what it is, and don't worry about whatever it isn't.

If you have another (broken) watch of similar size & colour laying around in a drawer somewhere, you could consider moving the bow across.
 

Kent

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Hi we7h:

Please add my welcome to those of the others.

Your watch case is referred to as a Hinged Back & Bezel (HB&B) case. A Half-Hunter (aka Demi-Hunter) is a different style of case; one having a small crystal and hour figures in its metal cover.

1908_May-13_AWCCo_Pedigree_Demi_Hunter.jpg
 

eri231

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The cylinder movement was built by the FHF of Fontainmelon

The case is certainly in 14K gold, the Squirrel mark is visible in the case which identifies the title in 14K gold and also the metal writing is mandatory only in the gold cases. See David Boettcher's article

""Fourteen Carat Gold
The second standard of gold recognised by the 1880 Swiss Act was 14 carat. This was a standard of gold that had been used on the continent for many years and was very popular. The Swiss legal decimal fineness standard for 14K was 583‰ as shown in the illustration of the marks, which was confirmed by the hallmark of a single squirrel.""


regards enrico
 

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